PDA

View Full Version : camping stove


h0use
09-30-2011, 9:47 AM
i am looking to buy a portable camping stove but was wondering if i should go propain or one that is dulefule kerosin/unleaded. any recomendations would be great!

MasterrEugene
09-30-2011, 9:58 AM
if you're looking for a little one person portable stove system I might recommend the Swiss Ranger Stove.

http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/wx130-1.html

it comes in 3 pieces. "The set contains an insulated bottle with a cork lid, winged handle canteen cup, and a wing handled vented stove."

I saw it on Survivalistboards.com and I might buy one for myself or whatever

damon1272
09-30-2011, 10:12 AM
If you are doing car camping then I would recommend a coleman dual fuel. They burn gas or coleman fuel. They work great. Century sells as propane conversion to use bottles is $20. Very happy with my stove.

cannon
09-30-2011, 10:28 AM
Dual fuel all the way!

problemchild
09-30-2011, 10:56 AM
Dragon fly

Some dont like the plastic pump. There are other with metal pumps but they cost more.

http://youtu.be/7zqhGZKxz38

bohoki
09-30-2011, 6:09 PM
propane is great unless you are camping in less than 45 degree temp

i got one of those single burner bottle top ones and its nice

i got a pile of 425e in the garage but they take routine mantinence like cleaning the generator coil oiling the pump and so on

i use one to melt lead it has a nice sturdy grill

i also have a primus butane one its nice and tiny

Rouge Recon
09-30-2011, 9:00 PM
The Jet Boil line hands down:

http://www.jetboil.com/products/cookingsystemsNEW

acegunnr
09-30-2011, 9:26 PM
+1 the Jet Boils recommendation.

RobGR
09-30-2011, 9:46 PM
Another +1 on the jet boil. If you are hiking, it's perfect and compact. Boils in minutes, but not a large amount of water. $100 but $100 well spent.

Filipino
09-30-2011, 10:41 PM
MSR Whisperlite Internationale.

Had mine since the dawn of time. Runs forever.





.

MaxxZer0
09-30-2011, 10:47 PM
I like this one. Super light and compact.

http://www.traildesigns.com/stoves/caldera-ti-tri

bsg
10-01-2011, 12:29 AM
i've been looking at camping stoves in thrift stores recently. this thread may be of benefit to me; hopefully.

TheChief
10-01-2011, 4:28 AM
I like this one. Super light and compact.

http://www.traildesigns.com/stoves/caldera-ti-tri


This one looks real promising! I love the use of titanium and collapsing into your pot/cup as well as the leave no trace titanium ground sheet.

While I am not a fan of esbit or sterno cooking, I like the wood fire option.

Rule .308
10-01-2011, 7:06 AM
If size is not too much of an issue I would just go with the old school coleman. You can pick them up for 10-25 bucks at the swap meet and they work great. Buy the propane adapter for it and carry both the propane and coleman fuel setups all in one deal. One of my kids just spent a weekend in Yosemite with a setup like this and it worked perfectly. The dual fuel stoves are nice but even Coleman recommends not using gasoline in them anymore. The gas will work just fine but the amount of additives that are in gasoline these days is just staggering and burning it in an open flame while preparing your meal is probably not a good idea.

Rhythm of Life
10-01-2011, 7:18 AM
The Jet Boil line hands down:

http://www.jetboil.com/products/cookingsystemsNEW

+1 the Jet Boils recommendation.

How many times have you cooked something besides Moutain House?

Never because you cannot cook with a JetBoil only boil water.

MSR Whisperlite Internationale.

Had mine since the dawn of time. Runs forever.





.

This x1000


Multi fuel capabilities, great reliability.

Cali-Shooter
10-01-2011, 7:53 AM
Volcano stove, the propane capable version. Collapsible and portable.

/thread

scarville
10-01-2011, 9:16 AM
For car camping or a backup stove for the house, I much prefer propane. I have an old two burner Coleman that I've used for decades. It is easy to set up, light and cook on. The womenfolk really appreciate that. For backpacking, I used to have a white gas stove -- some Swedish brand I can't remember the name of -- but I switched to alcohol 20 years or so back. Now I use a Triad or Brasslite alcohol stove.

problemchild
10-01-2011, 2:53 PM
How many times have you cooked something besides Moutain House?

Never because you cannot cook with a JetBoil only boil water.

If I were to buy today I would buy the Optimus Nova Plus. Metal valves multi-fuel two valves.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ryJxhQRTUvg&feature=related



This x1000


Multi fuel capabilities, great reliability.

I have or have owned every stove on the planet. I own the jetboil but like others said you can ONLY boil water or make coffee.

The msr international only has ONE valve allowing an on/off type heat. There is no second valve to simmer eggs or keep food warm after cooking it.

Dragonfly is the international with a second valve. It uses any fuel that burns. Some complain about the plastic valve but it has never failed me in over a decade.

asheron2
10-02-2011, 7:59 AM
Optimus nova+

jbob
10-02-2011, 10:03 PM
You can cook on the Jetboil. They even sell a frypan and pot specifically designed for it. I opted for the adaptor that works with any pan for mine and use the Ti series pots from REI. Works great.

m98
10-03-2011, 12:43 AM
I would say for 99% of car campers, the colemans from wally world are plenty enough up for the task of grillin and heating. Mines is 5yrs old and the grill still works every time and i also have the adapter to run off the big propane cylinders if i was doing a major cook off.

WOLFPACK117
10-03-2011, 9:08 PM
I have Jetboil and Primus Multi-Fuel stoves. I pretty much do primitive camping.

shooter777
10-03-2011, 9:56 PM
MSR Dragonfly.

Hands Down
Shaker Jet
Re-buildable
leather cups need lube once in awhile
Strong base
Multi fuel
Pre Filter

I use the small fuel canister for cooking. It pressurizes better... Lots of things change over 8,000 ft elevation


I'm on my second pump in 10 years. Hundreds of days in the Sierra and Cascades. They are bomber. The new pumps are a little weird to me but I'll give everyone an update.. I'm taking mine to Saddlebag Lake on Thursday. High Sierra, Baby....It's Gorgeous.

shooter777
10-03-2011, 10:10 PM
Simple answer. It's always good to have a backup. Ya know, the One is None, Yadda Badda. In the backcountry, it's foolhardy to rely on one fuel source.
The Jetboil is a good backup to the primary. It won't process the volume that the HD burner will. That being said, the solo hiker would be served well with the Jetboil unless you have to melt snow for drinking water. I hope some of this helps

Stormfeather
10-03-2011, 10:31 PM
Jetboil has always worked for me.

ocmsrzr
10-04-2011, 8:54 AM
Jetboil is the ultimate in simple ease of use and speed but the Dragonfly is tops for flexibility.

So my Jetboil is in my truck with the rest of my work snivel gear and the dragonfly lives in my BOB.

cannon
10-04-2011, 10:34 AM
Unless you are backpacking get a coleman stove.

On a Coleman you can make a big pot of coffee while the bacon is frying and then do up a batch of eggs while you drink the coffee while the bacon finishes.

OnTheTrail
10-04-2011, 10:42 AM
I would say for 99% of car campers, the colemans from wally world are plenty enough up for the task of grillin and heating. Mines is 5yrs old and the grill still works every time and i also have the adapter to run off the big propane cylinders if i was doing a major cook off.

X2

OP are you car camping, need it for SHTF at the house, or are you gonna hike the John Muir Trail?

h0use
10-04-2011, 10:47 AM
Thanks guys I ended up getting a coleman dulefule and just used regular gas.
Works great. I have made coffee and made steak and eggs no problem with it.
I just wanted to get a back up stove just in case we had another major power outage and for general camping. I am also thinking about getting the Coleman dule fuel lantern. Maybe a battery one as well.

paul0660
10-04-2011, 11:00 AM
Thanks guys I ended up getting a coleman dulefule and just used regular gas.
Works great. I have made coffee and made steak and eggs no problem with it.
I just wanted to get a back up stove just in case we had another major power outage and for general camping. I am also thinking about getting the Coleman dule fuel lantern. Maybe a battery one as well.

Good choice. If you don't leave it out in the rain, your GRANDKIDS will be using it..........it there is gas or kerosene that is.

xrMike
10-04-2011, 11:10 AM
A white gas stove is slightly less convenient than propane, but gives better heat output on average. This is especially noticeable in cold weather and/or high altitude.

I've got an older Coleman Peak1 stove, bought back in the mid -80s. Pulled it out of storage last weekend and tried it out. Wouldn't pressurize. Took it apart and the only thing wrong was the pump assembly needed lubrication. The plunger is actually made of leather on this thing! Put it back together and fired it up, now it works perfect again, just like before. It looks just like this one:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v84/xrMike/misc/Peak1-stove.jpg

This thing will bring a quart of water to a rolling boil in just over 3 minutes.

k1dude
10-04-2011, 11:44 AM
Make your own!

http://zenstoves.net/

http://www.backpacking.net/makegear/falk-woodstove/index.html

http://www.backpacking.net/makegear/falk-catstove/index.html

paul0660
10-04-2011, 11:51 AM
When World War II began, Coleman was called upon to manufacture products for the various branches of the U.S. armed services, including 20-millimeter shells for the Army, projectiles for the Navy, and parts for the B-29 and B-17 bombers for the Air Force. In June 1942 the company was notified by the Army Quartermaster Corps with an urgent request--field troops needed a compact stove that could operate at 125 degrees above and 60 degrees below zero, was no larger than a quart bottle of milk, and could burn any kind of fuel. Moreover, the Army wanted 5,000 of the stoves delivered in two months.

Coleman worked nonstop to design and manufacture a stove to the Army's specifications. The end product was better than the Army had requested: the stove could work at 60 degrees below and 150 degrees above Fahrenheit; it could burn all kinds of fuel; it weighed a mere three and one-half pounds; and it was smaller than a quart bottle of milk. The first order for 5,000 units was flown to U.S. forces involved in the November 1942 invasion of North Africa. Ernie Pyle, the famous World War II journalist who wrote about the common man's experience in the war, devoted 15 articles to the Coleman pocket stove and considered it one of the two most important pieces of noncombat equipment in the war effort, the other being the Jeep.

Ernie REALLY needed a cup of java in the morning.

DRW1876
10-04-2011, 4:58 PM
I have used the Coleman stove since the 1970's. They work great. What I am tired of is the fuels, both white gas and propane. It's a pain to store, find if your in country and gets expensive if you have to buy from other than a big retail store.
I did some research and settled on the Deadwood Stove. I bought one about 6 weeks ago. It's definitely not for back packing, weighs in around 20 lbs, built like nothing I've seen in any store. It is the M1 Abrams of camp stoves. But the great part is it uses sticks and small wood! I've used it many times over the past weeks. I cooked meat on it's grill, fried stir fry in a 10 inch cast iron pan, boiled (real) rice in an aluminum pan, cooked eggs, bacon, you get the picture.

It appears to be a version of a rocket stove. I almost quit the search because all I was finding was customized "cans". This thing is much more subsantial.

However, it is heavy, somewhat costly, it gets extremely hot, I torched several hambugers before I figured out not to feed so many stick. On hot days it was a bit uncomfortable sitting next to because of the heat, this has turned into a postive on these cooler days. I think the initial cost will be offset by the fuel cost savings. :D

All in all the Deadwood Stove works. I'm very pleased I found it.