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View Full Version : Shipping parts to CA - noob question


arnub
09-29-2011, 12:38 AM
Hello everyone,

This is post #1 here and I'm hoping to get a collective knowledge, "yeah, this is how it is" answer. Basically a friend of mine lives in CA and needs parts for his Steyr M9. He asked if I'd be willing to buy a Steyr M9 and then detail strip it, sending everything EXCEPT the frame. The frame he has no interest in, melt it down, turn it over to the Sheriff, whatever--he doesn't want it. This would be everything else.

I have no problem with helping a brother behind enemy lines--and who won't take my advice to move to a free state--but I have no interest in breaking any laws or being a straw buyer. But it it's a matter of creating surplus parts from a soon to be orphaned frame, I'd have any particular issue with that. Assuming, of course, it's all legal.

So, there ya have... If you could help this noob out, I'd really appreciate it.

Thanks!

dantodd
09-29-2011, 1:03 AM
parts is parts. As long as you are not sending a serialized part you can send anything in. He is responsible for assembling the weapon into a legal configuration once it is here in CA.

The most obvious issue is if the Styer has a threaded barrel. If so he will need to have the threads turned off or welded over etc. before he assembles the weapon. However; CA's "assault weapon ban" doesn't have a constructive possession aspect to it so even if it is threaded he can possess it while not assembled and then deal with the threads before assembly.

Oh, and don't throw away a good gun/frame. Sell it or just put it in the safe, you never know when it will come in handy.

arnub
09-29-2011, 1:24 AM
http://img39.imageshack.us/img39/20/steyrm95.jpg
^^^
CalGuns search result.

Basically, this. As far as I know, the standard issue M9s did not have a threaded barrel. But the way I'm reading that, it's up to the receiver to make sure that the part is good to go before he assembles it. It is not on the sender to do so.

As for the frame, I'm inclined to hold on to it. Like you said, you never know if it might be handy. Or, I suppose this explains the Glock frames that I see on GunBroker.com... Someone probably parted it out and was left with an orphan frame.

oni.dori
09-29-2011, 1:27 AM
INAL, but from what I understand from my time on this site, as long as it is not an NFA regulated part, you are G2G.

arnub
09-29-2011, 10:22 AM
Sweet! I'm happy to help a friend out, but I just couldn't risk getting legally crossed up. But if they're not NFA or assembled, parts is parts, that's pretty straightforward. This is just a pistol's parts, nothing too fancy.

Thanks for your help guys!

bwiese
09-29-2011, 10:31 AM
1. I am unclear if the Steyr M9 is still on the Roster. If not, it
has to be acquired via CA PPT or consignment sale or lineal
intrafamily xfers. These guns are not that common.


2. To stay 'clean' you should buy the gun yourself and not receive
money beforehand. Your friend can buy the parts later.

3. Keep the frame or sell it later on Gunbroker.

Jason P
09-29-2011, 10:42 AM
That's a pretty badass firearm, just buy a complete one and keep it:)

Arisaka
09-29-2011, 10:56 AM
^^^ Yup, Steyr M9 is the ****. I want one bad. If only they would make a 10MM........

CHS
09-29-2011, 11:07 AM
Sounds like you get a free Steyr M9 frame out of the deal :)

But yeah, parts is parts. Perfectly legal. No worries.

arnub
09-29-2011, 12:06 PM
He and I have worked deals on car parts too, so money goes back and forth, so money before or after shouldn't be an issue. As long as it wasn't illegal, I didn't have a particular issue with helping a friend out. He was saying that he even has issues with dealers sending guns and parts that are on list because many places just don't want to deal with CA purchases. Honestly, I can say I blame them, even for a bro deal, this is a hassle. :^P

As for the frame, I'll probably just keep it... Or sell it on GB... Who knows. But I don't think I'll destroy it or turn it over to the Sheriff, that just seems like a waste.

arnub
09-29-2011, 12:11 PM
Quick question regarding serialized parts, the Steyr, like a Glock, comes with serial numbers for the frame, barrel, and slide. I think that some countries (like South Africa) have significant restrictions on the barrels themselves and Glock makes them this way so that it's all the same, no matter where it goes. However, the frame on the Glock is the "pistol," the barrel and slide just have serial numbers on them. If I'm reading this correctly, the Glock (or Steyr) frame is the "pistol" and that having a matching serial number on the slide and barrel is non-issue--they're just parts.

Librarian
09-29-2011, 12:23 PM
Quick question regarding serialized parts, the Steyr, like a Glock, comes with serial numbers for the frame, barrel, and slide. I think that some countries (like South Africa) have significant restrictions on the barrels themselves and Glock makes them this way so that it's all the same, no matter where it goes. However, the frame on the Glock is the "pistol," the barrel and slide just have serial numbers on them. If I'm reading this correctly, the Glock (or Steyr) frame is the "pistol" and that having a matching serial number on the slide and barrel is non-issue--they're just parts.

Yes, that's correct. See also the wiki -- http://wiki.calgunsfoundation.org/index.php/Definition_of_a_firearm/gun

bwiese
09-29-2011, 12:26 PM
Quick question regarding serialized parts, the Steyr, like a Glock, comes with serial numbers for the frame, barrel, and slide. I think that some countries (like South Africa) have significant restrictions on the barrels themselves and Glock makes them this way so that it's all the same, no matter where it goes. However, the frame on the Glock is the "pistol," the barrel and slide just have serial numbers on them. If I'm reading this correctly, the Glock (or Steyr) frame is the "pistol" and that having a matching serial number on the slide and barrel is non-issue--they're just parts.

Yes.

The one exception to this is the new Sig P250, where a small internal 'subframe' is the serialized "gun". On this particular gun, the plastic grip frame is NOT a regulated serialized gun: it was created so that a person buying a Sig P250 could swap in small, medium or large gripframes (and slides/barrels of various lengths) as optional unregulated parts while having purchased only one actual handgun.

Decoligny
09-29-2011, 1:31 PM
1. I am unclear if the Steyr M9 is still on the Roster. If not, it
has to be acquired via CA PPT or consignment sale or lineal
intrafamily xfers. These guns are not that common.


2. To stay 'clean' you should buy the gun yourself and not receive
money beforehand. Your friend can buy the parts later.

3. Keep the frame or sell it later on Gunbroker.


He will be buying the firearm, and keeping the serialized frame. He will only be sending some parts to a friend. Since he is purchasing the gun (frame) for himself, I don't see a problem with this being considered a "straw purchase" or having his friend sending him money ahead of the purchase of the parts that he will be taking off of the gun he is keeping.