PDA

View Full Version : LARGE Amounts of Dry Firing Harmful?


helpme
09-28-2011, 9:33 PM
So I just bought a LaserLyte target system and despite the fact that one of the cartridges I ordered(LT-9) wont function and the LT-45 requires an additional battery for some reason, I do enjoy it when it's working properly.

My question is, will using the training system and consequently dry firing thousands and thousands of times in the next few months harm my guns? I have a 9mm Springfield 1911 and a Kimber Custom II I will be using with the product.

The cartridges are essentially snap caps so I'm guessing that makes it less harmful but I'm apprehensive of ruining over $2k of guns by playing with them in my living room:confused:...

Anyone have some cold hard facts to share regarding this question?

Please no ridiculous opinions, you know what I'm talking about. :facepalm:

EDIT: Thanks for the responses so far everyone. I was just concerned because I've never contemplated dry-firing any of my guns THOUSANDS of times a year before. LaserLyte is definitely a fun product but like I said, I'm already returning 1 cartridge for repairs(LT-9) straight out of the box and potentially the second(LT-45) as well since it needs 4 batteries to function properly even though the manufacturer says 3??? "Gun toys" tend to be janky from my personal experience so far...
__________________

GoingQuiet
09-28-2011, 9:34 PM
Depends on the gun. Most firearms will handle an infinite amount of dryfiring.

Dannicus
09-28-2011, 9:43 PM
The laserlyte cartridge version acts as a snap cap. Dry fire away!

InGrAM
09-28-2011, 10:00 PM
You are good to go.

PRCABR4Christ
09-28-2011, 10:06 PM
a 1911 can be dry fired as most modern guns can, no worries, dry fire away :)

orangeusa
09-28-2011, 10:24 PM
My take on this - if you have to worry about dry-firing a gun, then you shouldn't own it. (And yes, I have been suckered into buying snap-caps over the years).

.

JanG
09-29-2011, 12:08 AM
i was told only rimfires need snap caps

chrisf
09-29-2011, 2:02 AM
As my mom use to tell me and still does "go on wit cha bad self"

tacticalcity
09-29-2011, 2:05 AM
Even if it were harmful and required you replace parts or even buy another gun, it would be more than worth it. The only way to truly master your firearm and stay proficient and at the top of your game is with lots of dry fire practice. You being your best possible self behind the trigger matters most.

briguy73
09-29-2011, 5:07 AM
I grew up being told that dry firing was harmful and would ruin your firing pin... It seems as times are changing or I was misinformed! In fact, I saw on Ruger's website the other day this very topic. They said that all of their centerfire firearms were safe to dry fire - rimfire firearms were not ok, though.

Bug Splat
09-29-2011, 3:36 PM
Only gun I have ever had problem dry firing without snap caps is my CZ97B. Broke my firing pin a few months after owning it while dry firing at home. Didn't know it broke till I took it to the range and it would not fire. I had been carrying that gun for 2 months with a broken pin! CZ had me a new pin in a week. Ever since, I have not trusted that CZ for defense. I have put 2K rounds through without a problem from the new pin. Could have been a bad part but my trust is gone. Its a range only gun now.

Today I always use homemade "snap-caps" in any gun I dry fire and I always check the firing pin when I'm done. Not needed in most of my guns but it does help me sleep better at night.

InGrAM
09-29-2011, 3:54 PM
Even if it were harmful and required you replace parts or even buy another gun, it would be more than worth it. The only way to truly master your firearm and stay proficient and at the top of your game is with lots of dry fire practice. You being your best possible self behind the trigger matters most.

+1 I Couldn't agree more with this.

NoHeavyHitter
09-29-2011, 4:03 PM
As has been said, most modern guns can be dry-fired with no ill effects.

That said, older guns especially ones made with cast firing pins should NEVER be dry-fired. I know that many people have broken firing pins on CZ-52’s and they now make machined replacement firing pins for that particular gun.

Personally, I have broken the firing pin on a VZ-50 by dry-firing it (only a few times). I had just finished cleaning the pistol and prior to reloading it, I dry fired it at a beer bottle about 6 feet away. Well, I heard a “tink” on the beer bottle and right away I knew I screwed up… Sure enough, the tip of the firing pin had fractured. Needless to say, I bought a pair of replacements and I NEVER dry fire my VZ-50 anymore.

rogervzv
09-29-2011, 7:32 PM
Depends on the gun. Most firearms will handle an infinite amount of dryfiring.

Precisely. My GP100, for example, benefits from dry firing. Smooths out the trigger. Other guns maybe not.