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gmacd1177
09-24-2011, 3:37 PM
Hi,

I just purchased my first Glock 17 and took it to the range last night. One problem I had was constant jamming. This should not be a problem with a brand new handgun so I wanted to ask about it. I noticed that it happened more in the beginning and when I loaded the magazine to capacity (10 rounds). I wonder if this is merely because the magazine spring is still tight but I do not recall this ever being a problem with my Sig P226 (.40cal) which shot just fine out of the box.

Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Freq18Hz
09-24-2011, 3:39 PM
Everyone is going to ask you if you are shooting reloads, or boxed ammunition, if so what type etc.

I had my first jam with a Glock. That being said, I haven't had a Glock jam since, but I don't shoot them often.

-Freq

RollingCode3
09-24-2011, 3:41 PM
i willing to bet you were ''limp wristing"

aermotor
09-24-2011, 3:47 PM
I shoot my Glocks very often and never have issues with reloads or factory ammo. We need more details to help you out.



What type of ammo are you using: Reloads or Factory? FMJ, Lead, Hollow Point, Round Nose, Flat Nose, Wad Cutters etc?


Are you using genuine Glock factory magazines? Does it happen with different magazines or just one?


When are the james occurring: First round, last round, middle of the mag?


I'm not sure you can limp wrist a Glock 17 (of course someone can argue it) but that seems very unlikely, though plausible I suppose if ammo/mags checks out.

nimbus
09-24-2011, 3:48 PM
I'm gonna go with limp wristing, too. Hold it high and grip it firmly like a good handshake.

Last week, I let a brand new shooter shoot my Glock 34 and it jammed (FTFeed) for the first time after 2000 rounds due to him not holding tight and high enough.

Tango_Whiskey
09-24-2011, 3:48 PM
You need to have a good solid hold on the grip as high up on the grip as you can.

mikeyr
09-24-2011, 3:53 PM
did you clean it before going shooting ? I did not clean my Beretta before its first shot and jammed like crazy, after cleaning no more jams.

Too many people first think of limp wristing when I am not convinced there is such a thing, clean the gun, lube it up properly and it should shoot fine.

510GUY
09-24-2011, 3:57 PM
Limp wrist shooting I bett also.

gmacd1177
09-24-2011, 3:59 PM
I was using boxed factory ammunition in the factory magazines. It seemed completely random when it would jam sometimes in the beginning and sometimes in the middle. It seemed to occur more when I fully loaded the magazine to 10 rounds. but I had about 10-12 jams over 200 rounds fired. This was my first time ever shooting a 9mm glock but I have 3 other 9mm handguns that I have fired before. It was quite strange since I have only ever once had a gun jam on me once before.

Slim///
09-24-2011, 4:04 PM
Have somebody else shoot it and see if the problem still occurs.

Bill Carson
09-24-2011, 4:05 PM
Could be the ammo. My buddy and I were at the range two weeks ago and he had bought some 9mm ammo from wal-mart ( I forget what brand). That ammo jammed on every mag and the older ammo he had from 15 years ago did not jam at all.

chiselchst
09-24-2011, 4:07 PM
What type of "jam'? Fail to go in to battery, FTE, etc?

Folks might better be able to help with more info. Pics?

bsg
09-24-2011, 4:28 PM
Have somebody else shoot it and see if the problem still occurs.


good suggestion; have somebody else shoot it who has experience with the Glock. that can rule out the simplest potential cause of the problem.

locosway
09-24-2011, 9:46 PM
did you clean it before going shooting ? I did not clean my Beretta before its first shot and jammed like crazy, after cleaning no more jams.

Too many people first think of limp wristing when I am not convinced there is such a thing, clean the gun, lube it up properly and it should shoot fine.

You don't want to clean the Glock for about 500 rounds or so. You want the lube that they ship it with to penetrate into the metal. You can add a little more lube to the barrel hood, but other than that just shoot it.

Have somebody else shoot it and see if the problem still occurs.

This is what I would do. Out of the 5 Glocks I currently own, and the other two I've sold, I've never once had a jam on any of them. I've never had a FTF or FTE on thousands of rounds. Most issues are either caused by limp writing the gun, or by a bad spring. If the brass is hitting you in the face, find someone to teach you how to shoot. If the brass is being ejected in a normal fashion, have an armorer inspect and shoot the gun or call up Glock and they'll have you send it to them.

tacticalcity
09-24-2011, 10:11 PM
"Jam" doesn't tell us anything. We need specifics. Since you don't know how to tell us what type of malfunction it was, I am going to assume you do not have professional training. Which strongly suggests you are doing something wrong. Wrong stance, wrong grip, wrong something. 99.99% of the time when something goes wrong it is not the gun it is the shooter.

Possible problem 1: The magazine is not fully seating. You are not supposed to top off your magazines download a 10-Rd magazine by 1-2 rounds and a hicap by at least 3. Doesn't matter if they are new or old magazines. That goes for all semi autos. The magazine can be inserted and even lock into place, and still not be seated properly which causes Failure To Feed issues. Meaning the gun jams with the round not fully chambered or the round just doesn't chamber at all and the slide closes on an empty chamber. The first is more common than the later but I've seen both.

Possible problem #2: You are bending your elbow too much, and relaxing your wrist too much. So when you fire, there is not enough pressure from you to hold the frame firmly enough in place. So when the slide comes back to chamber the round, the gun and the round are coming back with it. It can't finish the job. This can lead to both the above failure to feed issues as well as double feeds.

Possible problem #3: Cheap ammo can cause all kinds of issues. Make sure to use factory new from a reliable brand. Most likely however, both problems 1 and 2 are the issue.

SOLUTION: Take a handgun course. You can find one in your backyard by searching the COMPETITION, ACTION SHOOTING, and TRAINING SECTION here on Calguns.net. A one day course will fix you right up.

Mr.1904
09-25-2011, 9:32 AM
i willing to bet you were ''limp wristing"

yup

junkit_boy
09-25-2011, 6:05 PM
yup

the ol Lamar Syndrome

hybridatsun350
09-25-2011, 6:19 PM
I'm going to assume you're getting failures to feed as you've mentioned magazine springs. The ONLY time my Glocks jam is when I let someone else shoot them, and they limp wrist it. Glocks are more sensitive to limp wristing than some other guns. Get a nice high hold on it, and you'll be golden.

itsmeeddie
09-25-2011, 6:39 PM
I purchased a Glock35 put 100 rounds thru with 2 jams, I added alittle lube and went thru another 200 rounds no jams.......

Colt-45
09-25-2011, 7:11 PM
Was this a Gen4 G17?

ChrisTKHarris
09-25-2011, 7:17 PM
I'm surprised no one has mentioned that you might be limp wristing.

:hide:

dvsdev
09-25-2011, 7:26 PM
Possible problem 1: The magazine is not fully seating. You are not supposed to top off your magazines download a 10-Rd magazine by 1-2 rounds and a hicap by at least 3. Doesn't matter if they are new or old magazines. That goes for all semi autos. The magazine can be inserted and even lock into place, and still not be seated properly which causes Failure To Feed issues. Meaning the gun jams with the round not fully chambered or the round just doesn't chamber at all and the slide closes on an empty chamber. The first is more common than the later but I've seen both.

I would bet that this is most likely the problem.

Caladain
09-25-2011, 7:28 PM
Possible problem 1: The magazine is not fully seating. You are not supposed to top off your magazines download a 10-Rd magazine by 1-2 rounds and a hicap by at least 3. Doesn't matter if they are new or old magazines. That goes for all semi autos. .

FUD FUD FUD. You shouldn't download glock mags, 30 round Pmags, or any other modern hicap mag/restricted mag. Present proof please of why this is necessary beyond handwaving.

Possible problem #3: Cheap ammo can cause all kinds of issues. Make sure to use factory new from a reliable brand. Most likely however, both problems 1 and 2 are the issue.

His glock should eat any factory ammo he throws at it. Russian, cheap, brass, alum, steel, FMJ, HP, etc. This is not a nickle-plated sissy pistol. If a modern semi-auto gun (Glock, Sig, XD) isn't eating anything factory you feed it, and it's not mag related/severe limp-wristing, you have a seriously wrong situation.

Work the problems out one at a time. Most glock-mags are GTG out of the box, but it's possible you have a bad one. Borrow a known-good one and see if that fixes your problem.

Shoot off a bench, bracing the gun to make sure you're not limp-wristing it or some other such non-sense. If you have a known good mag and the thing is still malfunctioning on a bench with factory ammo, contact glock and see what they suggest.

robcoe
09-25-2011, 7:34 PM
Hi,

I just purchased my first Glock 17 and took it to the range last night. One problem I had was constant jamming. This should not be a problem with a brand new handgun so I wanted to ask about it. I noticed that it happened more in the beginning and when I loaded the magazine to capacity (10 rounds). I wonder if this is merely because the magazine spring is still tight but I do not recall this ever being a problem with my Sig P226 (.40cal) which shot just fine out of the box.

Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Some details on the jam would help out, Failure to feed, failure to fire, failure to extract, failure to go into battery, double feeding, ect

Never owned a glock, so I am not sure how well this applies to them, but the only time I ever had a problem like this was when I took my Ruger P90 out the first time without cleaning it first. My advice would be to clean and lube it, then use some snap caps to cycle it and see if it still jams.

gmacd1177
09-25-2011, 10:09 PM
Thank you all for the information so far. To further clarify what is happening the next round is not chambering and sometimes will end up at a weird angle. This required me to drop the magazine and pull the slide (which was already half open) to release the jammed bullet. The gun was ejecting just fine and empty casings were flying like they should.

Since many are suggesting limp wristing and grip would it be any different than the .45 caliber glock? I fired 150 rounds through it no problem two weeks ago when I rented one. I purchased the 9mm since the ammo is a lot cheaper.

One last thought is about the ammo. I was firing new in box factory ammo but it was also 3-5 years old. Is this enough aging to cause any problems?

Turo
09-25-2011, 10:22 PM
Thank you all for the information so far. To further clarify what is happening the next round is not chambering and sometimes will end up at a weird angle. This required me to drop the magazine and pull the slide (which was already half open) to release the jammed bullet. The gun was ejecting just fine and empty casings were flying like they should.

Since many are suggesting limp wristing and grip would it be any different than the .45 caliber glock? I fired 150 rounds through it no problem two weeks ago when I rented one. I purchased the 9mm since the ammo is a lot cheaper.

One last thought is about the ammo. I was firing new in box factory ammo but it was also 3-5 years old. Is this enough aging to cause any problems?

I've had a similar issue when using a cheap (KCI) brand magazine. The feed lips of the magazine were too wide, and it was causing the rounds to slip out of the top front of the magazine and end up pointing left and up.

I'm assuming the magazines you are using are factory, but have to checked to make sure they are 9mm mags and not .40S&W? They are very close, but can cause issues like you're describing when the .40 mags are used for 9mm.

gmacd1177
09-25-2011, 10:28 PM
I've had a similar issue when using a cheap (KCI) brand magazine. The feed lips of the magazine were too wide, and it was causing the rounds to slip out of the top front of the magazine and end up pointing left and up.

I'm assuming the magazines you are using are factory, but have to checked to make sure they are 9mm mags and not .40S&W? They are very close, but can cause issues like you're describing when the .40 mags are used for 9mm.

The magazine says 9mm on it and is the one sold with the gun. I will try different hand grips on it the next time I go to the range to see if that makes a difference.

Lumpia is sarap!
09-25-2011, 10:35 PM
Are you holding it like this?
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v171/Gregdog/Pin%20Ups/Wrong.jpg

gmacd1177
09-25-2011, 10:37 PM
Are you holding it like this?
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v171/Gregdog/Pin%20Ups/Wrong.jpg

No, I usually hold it a little higher than that and my left hand is usually more on the side and not underneath my right hand.

InGrAM
09-25-2011, 10:43 PM
Are you holding it like this?
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v171/Gregdog/Pin%20Ups/Wrong.jpg

It is called the "Cup & Saucer" grip. It is a horrible way to hold a handgun. NTM, It makes the shooter performing it look like a complete newbie. :facepalm:

This is just as bad......
http://img841.imageshack.us/img841/49/dirtyharryy.jpg (http://imageshack.us//my-images/841/dirtyharryy.jpg/)

No disrespect to Mr. Eastwood.

Turo
09-25-2011, 10:53 PM
It is called the "Cup & Saucer" grip. It is a horrible way to hold a handgun. NTM, It makes the shooter performing it look like a complete newbie. :facepalm:

This is just as bad......
http://img841.imageshack.us/img841/49/dirtyharryy.jpg (http://imageshack.us//my-images/841/dirtyharryy.jpg/)

No disrespect to Mr. Eastwood.

Funny you should post that, I'm watching Dirty Harry right now!

NapaPlinker
09-25-2011, 11:01 PM
did you clean it before going shooting ? I did not clean my Beretta before its first shot and jammed like crazy, after cleaning no more jams.

Too many people first think of limp wristing when I am not convinced there is such a thing, clean the gun, lube it up properly and it should shoot fine.

Ive intentionally "limp wristed" a 92fs... And it jammed everytime. Then i held it normally and no problem.

tuna quesadilla
09-25-2011, 11:35 PM
FUD FUD FUD. You shouldn't download glock mags, 30 round Pmags, or any other modern hicap mag/restricted mag. Present proof please of why this is necessary beyond handwaving.



His glock should eat any factory ammo he throws at it. Russian, cheap, brass, alum, steel, FMJ, HP, etc. This is not a nickle-plated sissy pistol. If a modern semi-auto gun (Glock, Sig, XD) isn't eating anything factory you feed it, and it's not mag related/severe limp-wristing, you have a seriously wrong situation.

Work the problems out one at a time. Most glock-mags are GTG out of the box, but it's possible you have a bad one. Borrow a known-good one and see if that fixes your problem.

Shoot off a bench, bracing the gun to make sure you're not limp-wristing it or some other such non-sense. If you have a known good mag and the thing is still malfunctioning on a bench with factory ammo, contact glock and see what they suggest.

What the... that's absolutely, positively untrue. There are plenty of reasons for factory ammo to make a modern pistol choke.

Ammunition loaded too weak.
Ammunition loaded to incorrect COAL.
Ammunition with deformed projectile.
Ammunition with deformed brass.
Ammunition with primer set incorrectly.

I have seen all of the above with my own two eyes and they are legitimate issues that caused factory ammo to screw with an otherwise reliable firearm. Of course 99% of these issues happen with the cheap crappy ammo.

My go-to factory FMJ loads are Speer, Aguila, and American Eagle -- those are the only ones with which I've yet to experience any of the above issues.

tuna quesadilla
09-25-2011, 11:44 PM
Also, this is really a long shot (ha ha, no pun intended) but is it an off-roster Gen4 Glock? I've seen documented reports of unreliability with lower grade ammo due to the OEM recoil spring on the Gen4s.

NSR500
09-26-2011, 12:07 AM
Downloading modern magazine fed guns = FUD

:facepalm:

jessegpresley
09-26-2011, 12:21 AM
They need to rename limp wristing to something less offensive sounding. 'Cause nearly every time you suggest someone might be doing it they tend to get offended, as if you've questioned their masculinity or sexuality or sumpin'.

Merc1138
09-26-2011, 12:36 AM
They need to rename limp wristing to something less offensive sounding. 'Cause nearly every time you suggest someone might be doing it they tend to get offended, as if you've questioned their masculinity or sexuality or sumpin'.

What else would we call it? The problem is that the shooter is leaving their wrist limp. So what if it sounds bad, do you think "sissy wristing" would sound any better?


Too many people first think of limp wristing when I am not convinced there is such a thing, clean the gun, lube it up properly and it should shoot fine.

Yes, there is such a thing as limp wristing and it's precisely why so many people have mentioned it. Just because you haven't done it, doesn't mean it's some fairy tale.

Caladain
09-26-2011, 6:02 AM
What the... that's absolutely, positively untrue. There are plenty of reasons for factory ammo to make a modern pistol choke.

Ammunition loaded too weak.
Ammunition loaded to incorrect COAL.
Ammunition with deformed projectile.
Ammunition with deformed brass.
Ammunition with primer set incorrectly.

I have seen all of the above with my own two eyes and they are legitimate issues that caused factory ammo to screw with an otherwise reliable firearm. Of course 99% of these issues happen with the cheap crappy ammo.

My go-to factory FMJ loads are Speer, Aguila, and American Eagle -- those are the only ones with which I've yet to experience any of the above issues.


And the number per 1000 rounds where you encounter these problems? In the last batch of Tula 45acp, i had one dud, no FTE, or any other malfunctions. Conversely, in my last batch of 1k Speer, i had 2 duds, and a squib. The only malformed round i've see out of a factory box came from a White Box, and the FMJ head was all mangled (i'm guessing during manufacture).

I've yet to actually see actual numbers to back up many people's claim against the steel cased poly coated rounds, non premium rounds, or alum rounds (CCI blazer). First it was handwaving with "it'll hurt the extractor", then "it's corrosive", etc.

I'd be highly suspect of any firearm that didn't cycle Wolf, Bear, Tula, Aquila, Speer, AE, Win, Rem, BH, etc, UNLESS the manufacturer states their firearm will not cycle it (I think high-point has a carbine that won't feed alum rounds, and the manual states so in big letters). I'd be highly suspect of any modern pistol that didn't cycle Hollow points along with FMJ, with the exception of a few high-performance 1911's or race-guns.

I'm almost tempted to do a Glock Destruction Derby and see how long i can keep firing it with Wolf/Blazer/Herterz until the gun breaks.

Caladain
09-26-2011, 6:12 AM
Downloading modern magazine fed guns = FUD

:facepalm:

It's gunshop fud. It's hoo-doo-voo-doo without any logic backing it up, playing on the fear and uncertainty of the user from a position of authority. Same tone that states glocks jam and to trust a wheel gun, or that 9mm isn't enough to stop a man (I personally shoot 45acp, but modern 9mm loads are very impressive).

There are a few reasons we downloaded mags in the past:

In Vietnam, smart money was to load 28-29 rounds in your 30 round AR magazines. There were a variety of issues that it solved, but primarily it was due to not being able to seat the magazine on a closed bolt for some magazines. It was also possible to load 31 rounds into most magazines, which *would* cause feed issues almost every time. AR mags have evolved, and with the new followers and springs you should be able to fully load the magazine without issue and *shouldn't* be able to overload.

In WWII, the Sten and other submachine guns would have feed issues when fully loaded mags were fed into them. The gun itself was cheap to make, and made in bulk quickly in wartime..there were issues and downloading solved most of them *if* you encountered the problem with your particular sten.

There is a school of thought that states that it one should download your magazine by 1 to make tactical reloading easier, but this primarily seems to come from Vickers and not from any of the major schools or ex-shooters or comp guys *that i've heard of*. There's a logic to this, but i haven't found it particularly difficult to reload a full mag on a closed bolt (i live currently in NH and can have, and do play with proper capacity magazines). But the reasons to download have nothing to do with jamming or somesuch on a modern glock in relation to the OP's problems.

He could have a bad mag, but that's a rarity. He can always buy another mag for a few bucks and see if it fixes the issue, or borrow a known-good mag

dvsdev
09-26-2011, 9:18 AM
Possible problem 1: The magazine is not fully seating. You are not supposed to top off your magazines download a 10-Rd magazine by 1-2 rounds and a hicap by at least 3. Doesn't matter if they are new or old magazines. That goes for all semi autos. The magazine can be inserted and even lock into place, and still not be seated properly which causes Failure To Feed issues. Meaning the gun jams with the round not fully chambered or the round just doesn't chamber at all and the slide closes on an empty chamber. The first is more common than the later but I've seen both.

I'm going to elaborate more on this. It sounds like you are having a failure to feed problem. With new magazines, the springs may be very stiff and put a lot of pressure on the rounds against the lips, which do not allow them to fully chamber when the slide returns forward. As a result, the slide looks like it is halfway forward with a round still half way in the magazine.

Also, the magazine may or may not be fully seated. The tight tension of the spring may not allow the magazine to fully seat. E.g. With the slide forward, you insert a fully loaded magazine into the magwell. The tight tension of the spring does not allow the first round to "dip" back into the magazine and lock the mag into place. This is the same problem people are having with 10/30 or 10/20 PMAGs. The magazine does not lock into place with the bolt forward. As a result, they need to load with the bolt locked back or down-load the magazine.

In short, your magazine springs may be very stiff and need some breaking in. Down-loading the mags should help with the feeding issue while breaking in the springs. After the springs are broken in, you may not need to down-load the mags anymore.

dvsdev
09-26-2011, 9:53 AM
This is the same problem people are having with 10/30 or 10/20 PMAGs.

I want to clarify that this is not the exact same problem as the PMAG, but the concept is the same. The block/rivet in the PMAG is preventing the round to "dip" back in to fully seat the mag.

Blackhawk556
09-26-2011, 10:27 AM
i willing to bet you were ''limp wristing"

I'm gonna go with limp wristing, too. Hold it high and grip it firmly like a good handshake.

Last week, I let a brand new shooter shoot my Glock 34 and it jammed (FTFeed) for the first time after 2000 rounds due to him not holding tight and high enough.

You need to have a good solid hold on the grip as high up on the grip as you can.

Limp wrist shooting I bett also.




This is what I would do. Out of the 5 Glocks I currently own, and the other two I've sold, I've never once had a jam on any of them. I've never had a FTF or FTE on thousands of rounds. Most issues are either caused by limp writing the gun, or by a bad spring. If the brass is hitting you in the face, find someone to teach you how to shoot. If the brass is being ejected in a normal fashion, have an armorer inspect and shoot the gun or call up Glock and they'll have you send it to them.

"Jam" doesn't tell us anything. We need specifics. Since you don't know how to tell us what type of malfunction it was, I am going to assume you do not have professional training. Which strongly suggests you are doing something wrong. Wrong stance, wrong grip, wrong something. 99.99% of the time when something goes wrong it is not the gun it is the shooter.

yeah, 99.9% because it's never glock, they are awesome:facepalm::facepalm:

Possible problem #2: You are bending your elbow too much, and relaxing your wrist too much. So when you fire, there is not enough pressure from you to hold the frame firmly enough in place. So when the slide comes back to chamber the round, the gun and the round are coming back with it. It can't finish the job. This can lead to both the above failure to feed issues as well as double feeds.



yup

I'm going to assume you're getting failures to feed as you've mentioned magazine springs. The ONLY time my Glocks jam is when I let someone else shoot them, and they limp wrist it. Glocks are more sensitive to limp wristing than some other guns. Get a nice high hold on it, and you'll be golden.

I'm surprised no one has mentioned that you might be limp wristing.

:hide:

What else would we call it? The problem is that the shooter is leaving their wrist limp. So what if it sounds bad, do you think "sissy wristing" would sound any better?



Yes, there is such a thing as limp wristing and it's precisely why so many people have mentioned it. Just because you haven't done it, doesn't mean it's some fairy tale.


Why is it that people say they love glocks as a carrying firearm because they don't have to worry about messing with safeties and a bunch of other cr@p???????

Everytime someone mentions a problem with a glock, right away people start saying "limp wristing" With glocks you might not have to worry about safeties but if you have to worry about holding high, tight, firm, not weak, and all this other stuff then what's the advantage of getting one??

When someone starts a thread about glocks being extra sensitive to limp wrisiting the fanboys are kick to kill that rumor. But when someone has a problem with a glock "limp wristing" is always the culprit. :facepalm:

Lumpia is sarap!
09-26-2011, 10:51 AM
Because Glock teaches how to hold a semi-auto correctly.

zfields
09-26-2011, 10:52 AM
Why is it that people say they love glocks as a carrying firearm because they don't have to worry about messing with safeties and a bunch of other cr@p???????

Everytime someone mentions a problem with a glock, right away people start saying "limp wristing" With glocks you might not have to worry about safeties but if you have to worry about holding high, tight, firm, not weak, and all this other stuff then what's the advantage of getting one??

When someone starts a thread about glocks being extra sensitive to limp wrisiting the fanboys are kick to kill that rumor. But when someone has a problem with a glock "limp wristing" is always the culprit. :facepalm:


Fanboism. Plain and simple.

OP have someone else shoot it, if it goes away, your not doing your part. If it doesnt go away, try diff mags. Still jams, call up glock.

Blackhawk556
09-26-2011, 10:55 AM
Because Glock teaches how to hold a semi-auto correctly.
You're being sarcastic right??? lol

Merc1138
09-26-2011, 11:11 AM
Why is it that people say they love glocks as a carrying firearm because they don't have to worry about messing with safeties and a bunch of other cr@p???????

Everytime someone mentions a problem with a glock, right away people start saying "limp wristing" With glocks you might not have to worry about safeties but if you have to worry about holding high, tight, firm, not weak, and all this other stuff then what's the advantage of getting one??

When someone starts a thread about glocks being extra sensitive to limp wrisiting the fanboys are kick to kill that rumor. But when someone has a problem with a glock "limp wristing" is always the culprit. :facepalm:

I've never said I love glocks, nor do I currently own a glock. I have also never claimed the glock wasn't sensitive to limp wristing when people have claimed that it was.

Maybe you should make less assumptions about other people and worry more about why you care about whether or not glock fanboys exist.

whipkiller
09-26-2011, 11:19 AM
I'm surprised no one has mentioned that you might be limp wristing.

:hide:

I'm surprised nobody has told him to get a 1911:facepalm:

ZombieTactics
09-26-2011, 12:12 PM
A few random observations in no particular order:

New guns are less reliable than guns which have been broken in. Yes, this probably applies less to some brands/models than others, and every gun has its little issues.

Ammo can make a difference. Even so, if you run through 100 rounds of anything normal and it still has the problem ... probably not the ammo.

There isn't a gun which cannot be caused to malfunction owing to some common user error. It usually involves something you saw in a movie or on TV.

Training with a decent instructor should not be considered optional. My personal opinion is that you should spend about as much money on training as you do on ammo in any given year. You'll get back your investment in spades. Plan accordingly.

Some guns have issues with fully-loaded magazines. Shoot them a bunch til it stops happening or deal with it.

JTROKS
09-26-2011, 12:23 PM
I'm surprised nobody has told him to get a 1911:facepalm:

LOL! I was going to do it, but I held my fingers.

My 11 year old tend to have FTF with my G35 40-9 converted when it had the factory recoil spring system. He still hasn't developed those wrist muscles and he is definitely scared of the recoil. Now that it has a reduced recoil spring he doesn't have too many FTF, just bad flinching. I have to admit that Glocks have some stiff factory recoil springs when you put a standard G17 in a G35 with the longer slide and barrel adding weight. It is just crying for lighter recoil spring.

Matt P
09-26-2011, 2:18 PM
Everytime someone mentions a problem with a glock, right away people start saying "limp wristing" With glocks you might not have to worry about safeties but if you have to worry about holding high, tight, firm, not weak, and all this other stuff then what's the advantage of getting one??
I would suggest there blkhwk that the interest in them has to do with many things vs any one thing.
The immense popularity in this brand means loads of aftermarket interest in producing accessories for them. Holsters for this series are almost always easy to find most anywhere. After market goodies are very plentiful, and most can be installed by the end user.
For those who can enjoy and appreciate, I can install what I consider a improvment in trigger press in about 30 secs (As can most anyone)
Along with easily extending the slide release, mag, and even extending the take down.
So, these would just be a few of those advantages as I see them.
I do not know of any other handgun so easily modified with as much simplicity as the Glock series.
Not to say everyone buys it for that reason, much less that it also needs it.
It is an excellent tool to teach a new shooter with in my opinion. Same trigger press each time.
Its a striker fired, so no internal hammer, and unless the trigger is being pressed, no spring tension on the firing striker.
Again, I see it as embracing what a handgun should be seen as for self defense.
Chamber it, then holster. When you need it, all you have to do is grip it and present it, and get on that trigger. No frame/slide safety to dis-engage.
All the above as I see advantages.......

As for failure to extract issues,
Glocks typically can allow for more shooter induced issues then others I have seen. All of those were easily traced to poor technique with a handgun.
Certainly other all steel and heavier handguns sit better in some hands. The weight of that handgun also lends to increased stability.
Bad technique is bad technique.
I have also seen bad technique induce other issues as in-accuracy with just about any handgun.
To suggest an issue as it relates to Glocks (Keep in mind also how popular Glocks are, so more sold then any other brand, and more seen issues) is a problem with the Glock brand, seems like just another example of shooters blaming everything else instead of being accountable.

So, if your lack of technique becomes more exposed with a Glock, do you then just buy something that will mask those limitations? Or, be accountable, and simply just get trained?
I suggest the latter, as from that, your enjoyment and confidence will certainly soar.


All the above just my opinion..
I own a few Glocks, but also own more of another type.

Hi, I am Matt and I am a FAN of Glocks.

Gryff
09-26-2011, 4:12 PM
99% guarantee you were limp wristing the gun. This is a very common problem with people (especially newer shooters) who try Glocks for the first time.

Two suggestions:

1) Hold the gun like you are trying to show someone that you have a firm handshake, and extend your arms and lean forward like you are holding a ladder for someone.

2) Have an experience Glock shooter try your gun to see if it jams for them.

dagger10k
09-27-2011, 10:25 AM
:facepalm: Please don't listen to this. I can tell you that I always load my semi-auto magazines to full capacity, and they always work. If they are not working when loaded to 10 rounds, the magazines or something else are DEFECTIVE.

Sometimes they need to be broken in a bit, but a magazine that's designed to hold x rounds should work when loaded x rounds.


You are not supposed to top off your magazines download a 10-Rd magazine by 1-2 rounds and a hicap by at least 3. Doesn't matter if they are new or old magazines. That goes for all semi autos.

Gryff
09-27-2011, 10:33 AM
:facepalm: Please don't listen to this. I can tell you that I always load my semi-auto magazines to full capacity, and they always work. If they are not working when loaded to 10 rounds, the magazines or something else are DEFECTIVE.

Sometimes they need to be broken in a bit, but a magazine that's designed to hold x rounds should work when loaded x rounds.

Agreed. The only time I've heard of downloading is with traditional AR mags. I have never heard of this being a necessity with pistol mags.