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signal5delta
09-07-2011, 9:19 AM
My son lives in Nevada and I was wondering when I visit him there are hiking trails near where he is,Monden,Gardnerville could I carry my handgun on the trails without any hassles.
Can anyone school me on what a non-resident of Nevada rights to carry. I wonder if the laws for a non resident are different when it comes to carrying a handgun in your vehicle than a resident. Thanks guys.

oc3068
09-07-2011, 9:30 AM
You can LOC on your person in or out of the vehicle. Just don't go to a police station, airport, courthouse.. blah blah blah with that..

Don't conceal unless you have a permit.

aermotor
09-07-2011, 9:31 AM
Pretty sure you can open carry, loaded or not in NV but you cannot conceal without a permit from either NV or a reciprocating state like AZ.

Big Ben
09-07-2011, 9:40 AM
You can get a non-resident LTC from NV that will allow you to concealed carry. Or go the cheaper route and get your AZ non-resident LTC, which has reciprocity in NV.

AZ permit costs only $60, plus the cost of getting 2 fingerprint cards rolled ($10 at my local sheriff sub-station). They also require an approved training course, but the requirement can be met with the NRA basic handgun course. The permit is valid for 5 years.

I live in Nor Cal, but travel to Reno and Tahoe occasionally. For the cost, the Arizona permit is the way to go.

J.D.Allen
09-07-2011, 10:39 AM
LOC is GTG. or like the others said gitchu a non res LTC from AZ. That's pretty much the easiest.

ItsPhipps
09-07-2011, 11:13 AM
Does Nevada reciprocate with the Florida or Utah permits?

Big Ben
09-07-2011, 12:15 PM
Does Nevada reciprocate with the Florida or Utah permits?

No, they don't, and reciprocity with AZ is new, as of 7/1/2011.

EDIT: See link for NV Dept of Public Safety for reciprocity info: http://nvrepository.state.nv.us/ccw_changes.shtml

stix213
09-07-2011, 12:30 PM
AZ carry permit took me probably around a month from ordering the packet to getting the license in the mail. They took my OR permit in place of the training requirement, which made things super simple. You can contact them via email to ask about using other state permits in place of training. They are surprisingly prompt and courteous for a government run operation (or perhaps I am just used to California gov mediocrity). Getting the AZ permit would be my recommendation for NV carry.

sandwich
09-08-2011, 3:47 AM
AZ carry permit took me probably around a month from ordering the packet to getting the license in the mail. They took my OR permit in place of the training requirement, which made things super simple.

AZ took my FL permit in lieu of training requirement and, for me, it took about a month from making a web request @ AZ to receiving the permit by mail.

Flintlock Tom
09-08-2011, 11:07 AM
AZ took my FL permit in lieu of training requirement and, for me, it took about a month from making a web request @ AZ to receiving the permit by mail.

Okay, you know, of course, that you cannot make a statement like this and not post a link, right?

Please?
:p

Aldemar
09-08-2011, 11:17 AM
Okay, you know, of course, that you cannot make a statement like this and not post a link, right?

Please?
:p

http://www.azdps.gov/Services/Concealed_Weapons/Permits/Obtain/

They actually answer their phone if you have any questions.

I got mine in less than one month from initial contact to receipt of LTC.

Used my Florida LTC.

hammerhead_77
09-08-2011, 11:50 AM
I got my NV CWP (concealed weapon permit) after my last class out at Frontsight. Easy to do, but you have to go to the Sheriff's office in person to pick it up once it is ready.

LOC is fine in Nevada...we went through the statutes in detail in the CPW class. In fact, I was surprised to find that you can LOC on the Vegas strip! Now, if you do, Metro is going to pick you up...but it will be for causing a public nuisance, not for packing heat.

Scream_4637
09-08-2011, 12:04 PM
You can get a non-resident LTC from NV that will allow you to concealed carry. Or go the cheaper route and get your AZ non-resident LTC, which has reciprocity in NV.

AZ permit costs only $60, plus the cost of getting 2 fingerprint cards rolled ($10 at my local sheriff sub-station). They also require an approved training course, but the requirement can be met with the NRA basic handgun course. The permit is valid for 5 years.

I live in Nor Cal, but travel to Reno and Tahoe occasionally. For the cost, the Arizona permit is the way to go.

Although you can save money by getting a LTC from Arizona that is valid in Nevada, it is my understanding that you still run into the Federal Gun Free School Zone as Reciprocity agreements between states do not exempt those LTC persons from the Federal Gun Free School Zone. Only those with using an LTC for the state they are carrying in are exempt from the Federal Gun Free School Zone.

GFSZ WIKI AND ATF LETTER (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun-Free_School_Zones_Act_of_1990)

I have found this topic on several other forums but the Wiki has a supposed copy of a letter from ATF. If anyone else knows where we can find an official copy of the letter or ruling, please post.

IMO, if you are primarily going to travel to Nevada to visit your son, pay the extra money for the NV LTC so that you do not run into any GFSZ issues.

EDIT: Looked up 18 U.S.C. 922 (http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/usc_sec_18_00000922----000-.html). It's states that the exemption from GFSZ is for LTC's being used in state they were issued.

stix213
09-08-2011, 12:16 PM
Although you can save money by getting a LTC from Arizona that is valid in Nevada, it is my understanding that you still run into the Federal Gun Free School Zone as Reciprocity agreements between states do not exempt those LTC persons from the Federal Gun Free School Zone. Only those with using an LTC for the state they are carrying in are exempt from the Federal Gun Free School Zone.

GFSZ WIKI AND ATF LETTER (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun-Free_School_Zones_Act_of_1990)

I have found this topic on several other forums but the Wiki has a supposed copy of a letter from ATF. If anyone else knows where we can find an official copy of the letter or ruling, please post.

IMO, if you are primarily going to travel to Nevada to visit your son, pay the extra money for the NV LTC so that you do not run into any GFSZ issues.

EDIT: Looked up 18 U.S.C. 922 (http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/usc_sec_18_00000922----000-.html). It's states that the exemption from GFSZ is for LTC's being used in state they were issued.

Has any person with an out of state LTC that has a reciprocity agreement ever been charged under the federal GFSZ law while otherwise lawfully carrying?

Liberty1
09-08-2011, 12:20 PM
http://forum.opencarry.org/forums/forumdisplay.php?112-Nevada

fiddletown
09-08-2011, 12:28 PM
I got my NV CWP (concealed weapon permit) after my last class out at Frontsight. Easy to do, but you have to go to the Sheriff's office in person to pick it up once it is ready...Not necessarily. I took my class in Washoe County (Reno). I had to go to the Sheriff's office to apply in person (which I did the Monday after my Saturday class), but they mailed me my LTC.

Scream_4637
09-08-2011, 1:19 PM
Not necessarily. I took my class in Washoe County (Reno). I had to go to the Sheriff's office to apply in person (which I did the Monday after my Saturday class), but they mailed me my LTC.

I also had my LTC mailed to me here in California.

Maestro Pistolero
09-08-2011, 2:36 PM
Ditto the above and would add that you may conceal in your car, loaded, but NOT ON YOUR PERSON without a permit. Glove box, under the seat, etc. OK.

gunsmith
09-08-2011, 7:25 PM
I got my NV CWP (concealed weapon permit) after my last class out at Frontsight. Easy to do, but you have to go to the Sheriff's office in person to pick it up once it is ready.

LOC is fine in Nevada...we went through the statutes in detail in the CPW class. In fact, I was surprised to find that you can LOC on the Vegas strip! Now, if you do, Metro is going to pick you up...but it will be for causing a public nuisance, not for packing heat.


open carry is legal and if you know of any police harassment on the strip please cite! LV Metro reportedly has been cooperative, it took some time but they are not detaining people illegally WRT open carry. If you know different you should have no problem finding a cite.

Quiet
09-08-2011, 8:45 PM
open carry is legal and if you know of any police harassment on the strip please cite! LV Metro reportedly has been cooperative, it took some time but they are not detaining people illegally WRT open carry. If you know different you should have no problem finding a cite.

What he said, if you know of an incident (LVMPD being aggresive with open carriers) speak up.

The ACLU of NV has been browbeating LVMPD to ease up on open carriers or else they'll sue for civil rights violations.

gunsmith
09-09-2011, 9:55 AM
the silence of the fuds

colddeadhands
09-09-2011, 10:05 AM
Loaded open carry is good to go in NV, and common at least in the rural parts. You can also conceal a loaded handgun in your vehicle as long as it isn't on your person. You can get a non resident CCW if you want to conceal on your person. You cant take a firearm into a government building, regardless of residency or CCW status. you can have a loaded mag in a long gun in your vehicle but the fish and game code prevents transporting a long gun with a round in the chamber.

I open carry all the time, nobody around here thinks anything of it.

gunsmith
09-09-2011, 11:34 PM
Loaded open carry is good to go in NV, and common at least in the rural parts. You can also conceal a loaded handgun in your vehicle as long as it isn't on your person. You can get a non resident CCW if you want to conceal on your person. You cant take a firearm into a government building, regardless of residency or CCW status. you can have a loaded mag in a long gun in your vehicle but the fish and game code prevents transporting a long gun with a round in the chamber.

I open carry all the time, nobody around here thinks anything of it.
per open carry forum, people are open carrying into DMV all the time, the only thing that has happened is they get expedited to the front of the line. the NRS says you may not conceal in gov't buildings & is silent on open carry. places that completely prohibit are either schools and metal detector protected buildings like courts

colddeadhands
09-10-2011, 7:17 AM
I cant quote the law so in not going to argue. In Humboldt county (NV) all of the government buildings, schools, DMV, library, courthouse etc.. have a sign on the door that says no firearms with the penal code # I guess I'll write it down next time I see one. I'm friends with the guy who runs the Winnemucca cemetery and he says hes not allowed to bring a gun in his office because its a government building.

Not trying to spread fud, just hope I can help a fellow calgunner out.

Tripper
09-10-2011, 8:01 AM
military dd214 suffices for training requirements for AZ as well.

cmth
09-10-2011, 12:56 PM
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/2883584/NVCarryJuly1_2011.pdf

All of the pertinent laws on open carry in Nevada.

I will reproduce it here for those who cannot open PDFs:

Open Carry

In Nevada, anyone who legally owns a firearm may carry that firearm openly. Per NRS 202.360, felons, drug addicts, fugitives, illegal immigrants, and the mentally ill are generally prohibited from owning a firearm. Per NRS 202.300, generally, to carry a firearm unaccompanied by adults, one must be at least 18 years old. The only law specifying an age limitation on handgun possession is Title 18 USC 922 X, which specifies that one must be at least 18 years old to possess a handgun. This is not to be confused with Title 18 USC 922 B, which prohibits the sale of handguns to persons under the age of 21, if the seller has a federal firearms license.

Nevada does not have laws specifically allowing open carry. There are no laws making it illegal though, therefore it is legal. Using the internet archive at http://www.archive.org/index.php for http://ag.state.nv.us/ (Nevada Attorney General Website), there is recognition by the Attorney General of Nevada of the legality of open carry in the FAQ section of old versions of the website. The current website does not contain this information.

Concealed Weapons

NRS 202.350 is the law concerning concealed weapons.

Below is the definition of a concealed weapon per this law:
Quote: "Concealed weapon” means a weapon described in this section that is carried upon a person in such a manner as not to be discernible by ordinary observation.

Anyone concealing a firearm without a concealed firearm permit recognized by Nevada is guilty of a category C felony. Per NRS 202.3688, NRS 202.3689, and the Department of Public Safety list, Nevada recognizes permits from AK, AR, AZ, KS, KY, LA, MI, MO, NE, NM, NC, OH, TN, RI, and WV. However, Nevada residents must have Nevada permits. Per NRS 202.3667, permit holders must carry the permit and proper identification when carrying a concealed firearm. Also, upon request by a police officer the permit and identification must be presented. The penalty for violation of NRS 202.3667 is a civil penalty of $25.

According to Attorney General Opinion AG 93-14, a weapon is concealed only if it is hidden on a person, (such as under a jacket,) or if it is in a container that is being carried by that person. For example, if a gun is in a briefcase and the briefcase is in one’s hand, then that person is carrying a concealed weapon. But if that briefcase is on the floor nearby then that person is not carrying a concealed weapon.

Vehicles

In a vehicle, a weapon may be concealed anywhere within the vehicle, or it can be out in the open within the vehicle. The only place it cannot be when in a vehicle is concealed upon a person, such as under a jacket or in a pocket, unless that person has a concealed firearm permit.

According to NRS 503.165 one may not have in a vehicle any rifle or a shotgun with the chamber loaded. Rifles and shotguns may contain a fully loaded magazine however. Handguns are fine fully loaded including with a loaded chamber.

Alcohol

Per NRS 202.527 one may not possess a firearm with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.10 or higher.

Location Restrictions

Per NRS 202.265 one may not have a firearm anywhere on the property of a University, School, or Child Care facility. Also, per NRS 393.410 loitering near school grounds with a dangerous weapon carries a greater penalty than loitering near school grounds without a weapon.

Per NRS 218.542 one may not possess a firearm in the legislative building nor in any other place where the legislature is conducting its business.

Per NRS 202.3673 people with concealed carry permits may not carry a concealed firearm into government buildings on public airport property or any government buildings with metal detectors or signs saying no guns are permitted. An application form described in NAC 202.020 says that all government buildings are off limits to concealed carry but there does not appear to be any law or regulation to support this.

A sign on a private building saying no firearms are allowed does not make firearms illegal there. If one is asked to leave however and does not then that person is
trespassing per NRS 207.200.

Per NAC 408.615 in a roadside park or rest area one may not "exhibit or use a firearm or other weapon." There is no definition given of exhibit, but per NRS 408.433, the penalty for the first violation of this regulation is a fine of not more than $100.

State Preemption

NRS 244.364, NRS 268.418, and NRS 269.222 state that the legislature reserves to itself the right to regulate the transfer, sale, purchase, possession, ownership, transportation, registration and licensing of firearms and ammunition in Nevada, and that no county, city or town respectively can infringe upon these rights. These laws specifically allow localities to regulate the unsafe discharge of firearms, and they also allow Clark County to maintain handgun registration. However, one must be in Clark County for 60 days before registration is required. Also, per NRS 407.0475 the Nevada Division of State Parks may not enforce regulations more restrictive than the state law with regards to firearm possession and self-defense.

Federal Preemption

Per Title 18 U.S.C. Section 926A, regardless of prohibitive local laws, one may transport a firearm from one place where a firearm is legal to another place where firearms are legal without fear of prosecution, if the firearm is transported in a specific way. To be protected under this law, neither the firearm nor the ammunition can be readily accessible from the passenger compartment, or if the vehicle has no compartment other than the driver’s compartment, then the firearms and ammunition must be in a locked case other than the glove box or console. The law imposes no requirement to transport a firearm in such a manner, unless one is seeking protection from prohibitive local laws. This law is unlikely to be useful in Nevada, where restrictions on firearms are relatively minimal.

Also, Public Law 111-24 Section 512 states that no regulation that prohibits an individual from possessing a firearm in any unit of the National Park System or the National Wildlife Refuge System shall be enforced if the possession of the firearm is in compliance with the law of the State.

Federal Restrictions

One may not carry a weapon on postal property per 39 CFR 232.1. Per Title 18 U.S.C. Section 930 one may not carry a weapon in buildings owned by the federal government, although one exception allows for “the lawful carrying of firearms or other dangerous weapons in a Federal facility incident to hunting or other lawful purposes.” Per 49 CFR 1540.111 firearms are prohibited in the sterile areas of an airport.

Title 18 U.S.C. Section 922, (Q) is a federal law concerning school zones. Below is the main excerpt of the law.
Quote: It shall be unlawful for any individual knowingly to possess a firearm that has moved in or that otherwise affects interstate or foreign commerce at a place that the individual knows, or has reasonable cause to believe, is a school zone.

Exceptions to this law include the individual possessing the firearm being on private property, the individual possessing a firearm having been licensed to do so by the state where the school zone is located, or the firearm being unloaded and in a locked case. Title 18 U.S.C. Section 921 Definitions determines that a school zone is within 1000 feet of a school.

The history of this law is important. In 1990, Congress passed the Gun Free School Zones Act. In 1996, in United States vs. Lopez, the act was considered an unconstitutional extension of the commerce clause and thus was voided. Immediately after that, Congress passed a nearly identical law, but modified it declaring that all firearms have moved in interstate commerce and made it a crime to possess a firearm that has moved in interstate commerce in a school zone. This federal law may still be unconstitutional. The penalty for a conviction is up to five years in prison, a fine, or both.

This document should not be construed as legal advice. Always check the laws. This pamphlet attempts to accurately reflect the laws as of July 1, 2011. Other laws may exist.

http://forum.opencarry.org/forums/showthread.php?45415-Nevada-(Open)-Carry-Pamphlet