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Primewolverine
09-03-2011, 10:57 PM
Im a new gunowner would like to have recommendations on cleaning handguns and ar 15. Whats the best kits and tools for cleaning.

locosway
09-04-2011, 12:33 AM
This is a very opinionated and subjective subject. Your best recommendation is to follow the owners manual until you've had more time to read and digest the massive amounts of information that's available.

Personally, I use the plastic rod and brush that came with my Glock for my handguns. The cleaner and lube I use are Froglube. For my AR I use a cheap cleaning kit I picked up at Walmart, but you might want to check out the Boresnake pull through cleaners as well.

TimRB
09-04-2011, 8:52 AM
Get a Dewey cleaning rod for your rifle and your grandkids will thank you someday.

Tim

Primewolverine
09-04-2011, 11:31 AM
ok thanks. what about gun bluing? is that necessary?

Toyman321
09-04-2011, 8:59 PM
ok thanks. what about gun bluing? is that necessary?

NO, bluing is the finish that's on some guns, the bluing stuff you see at shops is a touch up (and not a good one) for a guns factory finish.

Primewolverine
09-04-2011, 9:30 PM
i have to ask about whats the best solvent, lubricant, and the difference or should it be used both the bore snake or rod?

Merc1138
09-04-2011, 9:49 PM
i have to ask about whats the best solvent, lubricant, and the difference or should it be used both the bore snake or rod?

To figure that out, you have to ask yourself what works best for you. Do you have some specific type of fouling that is causing you problems? You might need something specific for copper or lead if you aren't shooting jacketed rounds.

Rods are cheap and useful for a multitude of things. Can't use a chamber brush with a boresnake, and the boresnake doesn't do a great job of cleaning the chamber. The boresnake is good because it's very compact and can be used quickly. However if something crappy happens like brass getting stuck in the chamber, you can't shove a boresnake down the barrel to clear it out.

Some cleaning solvents stink to high hell. Others don't smell so bad. Do you have ventilation in a large area(like a garage) where you're going to be cleaning your guns? If you don't and live in an apartment like I do, then you don't want to be using hoppes.

Take people's suggestions, but don't rely on what anyone says as gospel because it might not work for you, might cost more for some specific reason that doesn't apply to you, etc. I suggest that whatever advise you do take about solvents and lubricants, buy the smallest quantity possible at first so you can decide whether or not it actually works for you. Buying a gallon of hoppes and not being able to use it in your living room because of the stink would be a waste.

Eat Dirt
09-04-2011, 9:58 PM
Some cleaning solvents stink to high hell. Others don't smell so bad. Do you have ventilation in a large area(like a garage) where you're going to be cleaning your guns? If you don't and live in an apartment like I do, then you don't want to be using hoppes.

Buying a gallon of hoppes and not being able to use it in your living room because of the stink would be a waste.

That's Blasphemy I say

Hoppes Is Man Cologne,!!!

medicdude
09-04-2011, 10:21 PM
Here's my cleaning recipe for my Glocks. Not saying by any means it's the right way, but it seems to work for me. Takes about 20 mins. Once a year or so I'll detail strip and clean everything but that because I'm a neatfreak.

1. Field strip, then completely disassemble the slide.
2. barrel: bore brush and Hoppes 9 solvent inside. Toothbrush and 9 outside. Run clean patches thru until they come out clean.
3. Toothbrush to all bare slide surfaces with 9. Pay attention to the firing pin area, and muzzle making sure it's clean.
4. Toothbrush and 9 to all slide components.
5. Use another toothbrush to brush each of the slide components under hot water. Again ensuring all are clean. 9 will gum up in hot water hence the need for the toothbrush.
6. While slide components are drying, toothbrush and 9 to areas of fouling on the frame, like the muzzle. Also brush visible/accessible components of the frame, all trigger mechanism surfaces and inside the magwell. then use patches and compressed air to finish cleaning up the frame.
7. Apply RemOil to the outer surfaces of barrel.
8. Reassemble the slide, except the barrel and guide rod. Again ensure firing pin channel is clean. This is a common cause of malfunctions.
9. Stack a few patches up and apply RemOil liberally, then wipe the external surfaces of the slide. This may take a couple coats as the 9 and hot water will strip all old oil.
10. Stand the slide on the muzzle on a stack of a few patches and spray a bit of RemOil in the grooves, and let it run down then take the patches with the leftover RemOil and spread it out on the underside of the slide where the barrel rubs during recoil.
11. Complete reassembly of the slide (barrel and guide rod).
12. Apply a bit of RemOil at the top of the connector and work the trigger by hand 5-6 times to work the oil in.
13. Reassemble the gun and manually cycle the slide to work oil in.
14. Sometimes I'll use compressed air on my mags too. I dont advise using solvents or oils on mags. But what do I know?

G-forceJunkie
09-04-2011, 10:33 PM
Where are you located? Someone local can probably help you out.

Primewolverine
09-04-2011, 11:55 PM
how often are you supposed to clean your guns?

Ricky-Ray
09-05-2011, 1:44 AM
Keep it simple. I use MPro 7 for my cleaning solvent. Not as bad of a smell as compared to Hoppes. Wife doesn't mind the smell of MPro 7 so that's a extra plus for me and it's also biodegradable. Boresnake/cleaning rod, bore patches, cloth rags, toothbrush, q-tips, and gun oil and your pretty much good to go.

Remus
09-05-2011, 11:43 AM
how often are you supposed to clean your guns?

Great internet debates have been had over these basic questions. I generally clean the day of use for my firearms. The degree of cleaning varies though. I generally use a light coating of Breakfree CLP and/or EEZOX and apply that to the moving points of the action and to the external points that my hands had contact with. I also run a bore snake through the barrel. After a long period of time I eventually use a rod and patches to remove copper fouling from my barrels.

For a semi-auto I recommend at a minimum of cleaning the action between uses.