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AeroEngi
08-04-2011, 5:37 PM
I just recently bought a Springfield TRP and upon field stripping it for the first time, I realized how difficult it was to push the spring plug in and turn the barrel bushing at the same time. Damn spring plug killed my fingers lol. So I was wondering, I know the Springfield instructions say to remove the bushing/plug first before removing the slide but wouldn't it be much easier to remove the slide first and then the bushing/plug? Am I missing something here?

Thanks for your help guys.

mtenenhaus
08-04-2011, 5:42 PM
That's exactly what i do. I pull the slide back, remove the slide stop and carefully remove the slide as an intact unit while controlling the spring in my palm so it doesn't get away from me.

nick
08-04-2011, 5:42 PM
What you're missing is the bushing wrench.

AeroEngi
08-04-2011, 5:44 PM
That's exactly what i do. I pull the slide back, remove the slide stop and carefully remove the slide as an intact unit while controlling the spring in my palm so it doesn't get away from me.

Ya, I thought that would be much easier. Is re-assembly just as easy?

What you're missing is the bushing wrench.

I actually ordered one like 2 days ago.

Cuda440
08-04-2011, 6:17 PM
Push in on the barrel plug with the baseplate of your mag. Save your fingers and don't spend money on unnecessary wrenches.

Buddhabelly
08-04-2011, 6:48 PM
Push in on the barrel plug with the baseplate of your mag. Save your fingers and don't spend money on unnecessary wrenches.

This.

The 1911 was designed to be completely detail-stripped with no tools.

nick
08-04-2011, 6:59 PM
Push in on the barrel plug with the baseplate of your mag. Save your fingers and don't spend money on unnecessary wrenches.

Well, I still appreciate having the unnecessary wrench, especially since CZ was nice enough to provide one with each of my Dan Wessons.

redcliff
08-04-2011, 7:02 PM
I usually disassemble my 1911's also by removing the slide first and cupping my left hand tightly under the recoil spring as I push the slide off. Reassembly that way can be difficult though.

Although the magazine floorplate is designed to serve as a bushing wrench, its quite easy to marr the finish if you use it as one, I prefer the heavy nylon bushing wrenches.

And I never, ever turn the bushing while the bushing is in its lock-up position with the barrel, I use an empty case positioned like a stovepipe to keep the slide retracted a bit so that the bushing when turned is farther down the taper of the barrel and doesnt make hard contact where it can cause burrs in the bearing surface of the bushing. This is especially important if you use an ange bored match bushing.

westcoast362
08-04-2011, 7:21 PM
Redcliff, your idea of using an empty casing to hold the slide a little way back is brilliant. I'm always trying to hold the slide back while using my unnecessary nylon bushing wrench. It didn't become a problem until the four finger bushing and the barrel that went with it came along.

psango
08-04-2011, 9:37 PM
I have a nylon bushing wrench, but never used it until I got my first Kimber with a full length guide rod. I need it to keep enough pressure on the spring to rotate the bushing.

I guess I just got used to pushing in on the plug and rotating the bushing on my mil-spec models.

Redcliff seems to have some great ideas and knowledge about these matters. I always read his posts with interest.

Buddhabelly
08-04-2011, 9:39 PM
Well, I still appreciate having the unnecessary wrench, especially since CZ was nice enough to provide one with each of my Dan Wessons.

The issue with using an external tool is that there may be times when you're caught without one... soldiers in the field, brief break during a match, etc... Sometimes you just don't have tools with you and it's best you learn to use/operate your guns to its intended design.

Tools are nice, cuda440 and I are just saying you can/should use parts of the gun that can do the same thing and save some coins. To each his own though...

PRCABR4Christ
08-04-2011, 9:42 PM
This.

The 1911 was designed to be completely detail-stripped with no tools.

+1, also the grip screws were meant to be disassembled using the mag as well, the GI 1911 is it's own tool box :D

PRCABR4Christ
08-04-2011, 9:45 PM
I usually disassemble my 1911's also by removing the slide first and cupping my left hand tightly under the recoil spring as I push the slide off. Reassembly that way can be difficult though.

Although the magazine floorplate is designed to serve as a bushing wrench, its quite easy to marr the finish if you use it as one, I prefer the heavy nylon bushing wrenches.

And I never, ever turn the bushing while the bushing is in its lock-up position with the barrel, I use an empty case positioned like a stovepipe to keep the slide retracted a bit so that the bushing when turned is farther down the taper of the barrel and doesnt make hard contact where it can cause burrs in the bearing surface of the bushing. This is especially important if you use an ange bored match bushing.

+1, another good point, match bushings/barrels are sensitive where they lock up, specifically in the bushing area, so relief by taking it out of battery will extend the life of those tolerances, your 'smith will thank you :D

AeroEngi
08-04-2011, 9:55 PM
Cuda440, thanks for the advice on using the mag baseplate on the spring plug! It totally made disassembly a breeze.

AeroEngi
08-04-2011, 10:11 PM
One more question guys. After cleaning the barrel, I noticed these lines/marks that go across the lands inside the barrel approximately an eighth of an inch from the muzzle. It's at the same location on each land. Is this normal? I've never seen it on any other handgun. Here's a pic

http://i1100.photobucket.com/albums/g416/AeroEngi/IMAG0109.jpg

InGrAM
08-04-2011, 10:40 PM
I used to use the magazine floor plate. You just push and turn. Kind if like a bushing wrench. I use a plastic bushing wrench now.

redcliff
08-04-2011, 10:46 PM
One more question guys. After cleaning the barrel, I noticed these lines/marks that go across the lands inside the barrel approximately an eighth of an inch from the muzzle. It's at the same location on each land. Is this normal? I've never seen it on any other handgun. Here's a pic

http://i1100.photobucket.com/albums/g416/AeroEngi/IMAG0109.jpg

My guess (and its only a guess) is its some type of machining chatter marks from the muzzle crown cutting tool or pilot for it. You might want to send that picture to Springfield Armory in an e-mail and get their take on it.

AeroEngi
08-04-2011, 10:55 PM
My guess (and its only a guess) is its some type of machining chatter marks from the muzzle crown cutting tool or pilot for it. You might want to send that picture to Springfield Armory in an e-mail and get their take on it.

Thanks man. I'll definitely send them an email first thing in the morning.

redcliff
08-04-2011, 11:00 PM
By the way, thanks for the kind words guys. If I have any 1911 wisdom to pass on to all my friends here it's only because I've lived with em so darn long and made lots of mistakes and had good teachers to help me out. Fortunately I find 1911's easier to be around than a lot of women I've known and a lot less maintenance intensive.

It sucks getting old but you learn a lot of trivia along the way :)

And back to the subject of 1911's being their own toolkit, my personal favorite part is J.M. Browning including a screwdriver on the sear spring to remove the magazine release.

PRCABR4Christ
08-04-2011, 11:12 PM
And back to the subject of 1911's being their own toolkit, my personal favorite part is J.M. Browning including a screwdriver on the sear spring to remove the magazine release.

I learn something new every day, I never thought about that...right on!

I will say this though, the good thing about a bushing wrench is that you don't goober up the checkering if your spring plug is so equipped :)

Cuda440
08-05-2011, 6:58 AM
I usually disassemble my 1911's also by removing the slide first and cupping my left hand tightly under the recoil spring as I push the slide off. Reassembly that way can be difficult though.

Although the magazine floorplate is designed to serve as a bushing wrench, its quite easy to marr the finish if you use it as one, I prefer the heavy nylon bushing wrenches.

And I never, ever turn the bushing while the bushing is in its lock-up position with the barrel, I use an empty case positioned like a stovepipe to keep the slide retracted a bit so that the bushing when turned is farther down the taper of the barrel and doesnt make hard contact where it can cause burrs in the bearing surface of the bushing. This is especially important if you use an ange bored match bushing.

Yeah, I didn't even think about that, I use CMC powermags that have a nylon baseplate. I normally grip the gun around the barrel in my left hand with the muzzle up, with my thumb and index finger where I can turn the bushing, and I use the mag in my right hand to push the barrel plug. Push in, turn the bushing, then you can use your left thumb and finger to grab the plug as you release pressure so that it doesnt shoot across the room.

dalriaden
08-05-2011, 8:19 AM
Push in, turn the bushing, then you can use your left thumb and finger to grab the plug as you release pressure so that it doesnt shoot across the room.

Which is exactly what happened the first time I cleaned my kimber :sweatdrop:

AeroEngi
08-05-2011, 12:44 PM
Ok, I sent the email and picture to Springfield. I'll let you guys know what happens when they reply back. Again, thanks for all your help.

t0kie
08-05-2011, 12:59 PM
They will take care of you, #1 cust. service. You may get a new barrel for free :)

Ok, I sent the email and picture to Springfield. I'll let you guys know what happens when they reply back. Again, thanks for all your help.

AeroEngi
08-05-2011, 1:01 PM
They will take care of you, #1 cust. service. You may get a new barrel for free :)

That would be sweet!!! :D

Do you think they will just send me a new barrel or will they have me ship the gun to them for fitting/installing the new barrel?

JosephP
08-05-2011, 1:14 PM
This.

The 1911 was designed to be completely detail-stripped with no tools.

It is different story if you have hi-end custom 1911s...
Bushing is very tight and you are not able to turn it with your bare hand.
I prefer wilson combat wrench since it is made with polymer to not scratch your pistol.

renardsubtil
08-05-2011, 3:58 PM
One more question guys. After cleaning the barrel, I noticed these lines/marks that go across the lands inside the barrel approximately an eighth of an inch from the muzzle. It's at the same location on each land. Is this normal? I've never seen it on any other handgun. Here's a pic

http://i1100.photobucket.com/albums/g416/AeroEngi/IMAG0109.jpg

That could be copper build up from the jacketed ammo. You may want to try and soak that barrel with Hoppes 9 for 30 minutes or so until you see green crap build up in the barrel from the copper disintegrating, then clean the barrel with CLP and a wire brush as usual.

That copper build up is pretty common. I think I use Hoppes to clean it copper residue out once every 500-1000 rounds.

AeroEngi
08-05-2011, 4:14 PM
That could be copper build up from the jacketed ammo. You may want to try and soak that barrel with Hoppes 9 for 30 minutes or so until you see green crap build up in the barrel from the copper disintegrating, then clean the barrel with CLP and a wire brush as usual.

That copper build up is pretty common. I think I use Hoppes to clean it copper residue out once every 500-1000 rounds.

Ya I dunno man. I looked at the same area in my Sig P220 and it had nothing like that in the barrel. I'll clean the crap out of it when I get home tonight. It's a long shot cuz they look/feel like marks left by some kind of tool. I guess this is all I can do until Springfield replies to my email. I'll probably call them on Monday too.

helpme
08-05-2011, 5:11 PM
BUSHING WRENCH! Buy one :)

Or just check the box your gun came in because alot of the nicer 1911's come with a plastic bushing wrench straight from the factory...

monk
08-05-2011, 6:08 PM
That could be copper build up from the jacketed ammo. You may want to try and soak that barrel with Hoppes 9 for 30 minutes or so until you see green crap build up in the barrel from the copper disintegrating, then clean the barrel with CLP and a wire brush as usual.

That copper build up is pretty common. I think I use Hoppes to clean it copper residue out once every 500-1000 rounds.


Is it ok to soak the entire barrel? My XD has a crap load of copper fouling. I ran some hoppes copper solvent twice, brushing between and it cleaned it a bit but not as much as I would've liked.

ninjawho?
08-05-2011, 9:36 PM
It is different story if you have hi-end custom 1911s...
Bushing is very tight and you are not able to turn it with your bare hand.
I prefer wilson combat wrench since it is made with polymer to not scratch your pistol.

this......

PRCABR4Christ
08-05-2011, 9:43 PM
That would be sweet!!! :D

Do you think they will just send me a new barrel or will they have me ship the gun to them for fitting/installing the new barrel?

A new barrel will need to be fit to your slide

xibunkrlilkidsx
08-05-2011, 9:46 PM
http://www.sightm1911.com/lib/tech/toolbox.htm


rookies....Once again this proves that Mr. Browning was a GENIUS!

AeroEngi
08-06-2011, 2:29 PM
Thanks for all your help guys.

renardsubtil
08-07-2011, 10:21 AM
Is it ok to soak the entire barrel? My XD has a crap load of copper fouling. I ran some hoppes copper solvent twice, brushing between and it cleaned it a bit but not as much as I would've liked.


I never use hoppes on the outside of a barrel or on my blued frame. I use it mainly to remove the copper build up, that's all.
Soak just the inside of the barrel, let it sit for like 15-30 minutes or so, wipe the inside like hell and take note of the green copper residue (remember to use a plastic brush too since a copper one will get messed up from the Hoppes). Follow up with a few patches of CLP and the usual clean patches to dry it up.

AeroEngi
08-11-2011, 2:58 PM
Just an update for those of you that are interested. I sent the gun back to Springfield for the barrel issue and some other minor issues. I emailed them the picture and they said the machining marks were totally not normal. Gave it to Fedex yesterday morning and Springfield received it this morning; really fast shipping! So far, I'm really impressed with their CS.

GMG
08-11-2011, 3:25 PM
A wealth of information in this thread..........Thank you!

AeroEngi
08-11-2011, 4:03 PM
A wealth of information in this thread..........Thank you!

Glad this thread is of some use!

Bullwinkle
08-12-2011, 12:01 PM
The 1911 was designed to be completely detail-stripped with no tools.Yes... but I have yet to find anyone who is capable of removing the mainspring housing retaining pin with just the safety plunger! :) Need a hammer & punch for that one.

So what part of the (Series 80) 1911 can you use to position the two firing pin block safety arms correctly in the frame? :confused:

+1, also the grip screws were meant to be disassembled using the mag as wellI thought it was a .45ACP casing? That's why on (real) 1911s there's a slight curve to the bottom of the screw slot. Doesn't really matter. Few, if any, even bother to make them correctly anymore... and with those ugly hex-head and torx grip screws that are replacing the standard slotted ones, well... tool required.

Yeah, I'm not going to jump on the 1911 bandwagon, or off it, or argue about how great JMB was or wasn't, but there's no denying that the 1911 was one of the most well thought-out designs ever as far as practicality in the field goes.