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runway1
08-03-2011, 8:07 AM
The description on Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-Buckmaster-4-5-14X-Mil-Dot-Water-Proof/dp/B002E6T0HW/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1312383765&sr=1-2

.. doesn't verify the turrets are mildot as well. I've read, and it certainly makes sense to me, that you want to match your turret's adjustment to your reticle. I.e. mildot/mildot or MOA/MOA but you don't want (especially for a beginner) mildot reticle with MOA turrets or vice-versa.

Ok, does the Nikon buckamster 4.5-14X Mil-Dot have mildot adjusting turrets?

joefreas
08-03-2011, 8:31 AM
Adjustment Graduation (1 click)1/4 MOA
http://www.nikonhunting.com/products/riflescopes/buckmaters/4.5-14x40_Side_Focus_Mildot/6469

joefreas
08-03-2011, 8:37 AM
What rifle are you going to put it on and for what purpose? If you are looking to learn MIL/MOA holdovers/adjustments you may want to have a scope with exposed turrets that is not variable power. 2nd focal plane scopes vary the MIL spacing of the dots when you change the magnification. They will only represent MIL spacing at one magnification.

If you are looking to learn MIL holdover these are great scopes. http://swfa.com/SWFA-SS-10x42-Tactical-30mm-Riflescope-P499.aspx Very simple, easy to adjust and very strong.

runway1
08-03-2011, 8:53 AM
It's for a Remington 700P. Intent is to target shoot from 200yds - 800yds, no hunting/carrying, just learning and plinking.

Don't know what is meant by "holdover". Also, I really wanted the variable mag scope because of the shooting ranges growing as my skills grow.

Again, what I read in the "Reticles - Mil vs MOA" sticky was that keeping the turret's scale the same as the reticle's scale is easiest - makes sense.

runway1
08-03-2011, 9:08 AM
Excepts from sticky:
"These days it goes without saying that if the option to have the knobs and the reticle both MOA or both MIL, it's better to do so. Not all scope manufacturers offer that option. It's not a deal killer, just nicer to have."


"Buy matching reticle/knobs.

If you want a mil-reticle, get mil knobs. If you want a moa knob, get moa reticle. NF provides that option.
And it IS the DEAL KILLER..... if you are spending any significant $$ on high-end gas, MIL-MIL or MOA-MOA is a MUST HAVE."


"I think that Jicko hit it spot on.....for the money that most of us spend on a scope, the knobs and the reticle should match."

joefreas
08-03-2011, 9:25 AM
Holdover is one of the reasons to use a mil dot reticle, it is the ammount you will have to aim high at a distance. If your rifle is zeroed at 200yd then you will have to hold half a mil or so high at 300 yards and so on.

It is definitely easier when you have a scope that is matched mil/mil or moa/moa. The problem is that these scopes get expensive.

What is your price range?

There is a problem with second focal plane mil dot reticles in that they only represent 1 mil at a given magnification setting. Zooming in or out will make them inaccurate. A first focal plane scope gets rid of the problem but they get very expensive.

Here is a scope that has a FFP and you get to choose mil or moa. Problem is they go for over $2000. http://www.nightforceoptics.com/SCOPES_OVERVIEW/3_5-15x50_F1/3_5-15x50_f1.html

joefreas
08-03-2011, 9:34 AM
The reason the buckmaster has moa turrets and a mil dot reticle is because it was meant to be zeroed and left. Not to be adjusted for each distance. They feel that you will use the mil dots for holdover. The problem with that is the mil dots will be different for different magnification settings.

The people you are citing in the thread are target shooters that spend a lot of money on scopes and are very particular about what they want.

I personally like MOA because it is easy to calculate as I am accustomed to using inches. 1 MOA is 1" at 100yds. I use a standard crosshair reticle and adjust my scope (via ballistic chart) to the range I will be shooting. This is much easier if you get a scope with exposed turrets.

runway1
08-03-2011, 9:58 AM
What is your price range?

That's the tough part. I'm in the Buckmaster range of ~$300. I may stretch a bit, but not much.

The reason the buckmaster has moa turrets and a mil dot reticle is because it was meant to be zeroed and left. Not to be adjusted for each distance. They feel that you will use the mil dots for holdover.

What about windage in this case?

What scope would you suggest for my application; Newbie, plinking and learning from 200yds-800yds, Remington 700P, 26" barrel, .308?

Thanks for the help!

joefreas
08-03-2011, 10:11 AM
Both turrets have screw on caps. Once your rifle is zeroed if you wanted to adjust for windage you would have to remove the cap and dial the adjustment. If you are just out shooting steel you will be able to see the mirage of what way the wind is blowing and hold slightly to the side without adjusting the turrets.

I own a few of the Nikon scopes and feel that they are great scopes for the money.

Spanky8601
08-03-2011, 12:16 PM
If you wait a while, Midway usually puts the Buckmaster 6-18 mildot on sale for about 300. It has target turrets and the adjustment is 1/8 MOA. Nice scope in your price range. Also allows you to make adjustments when you are punching paper and have the time to adjust.

Its MIL sweet spot is right at 12 power

runway1
08-03-2011, 3:37 PM
Thanks all. I appreciate the help!

G-forceJunkie
08-03-2011, 7:40 PM
Another perspective: I have two rifles with the 6-18 buckmaster and wish I had gotten the 4.5-14 because it has the 1/4 moa click knobs. With the 1/8 moa knobs, you only have 6 moa of adjustmet per revolution. You want to get that 308 out that far, your going to be turning the knobs alot, as in 4 or more complete revolutions. You will get "lost" trying to get back to your zero. the 12 moa per revolutiong knobs of the lower power scope will be much easier to use. If your going to zero it and forget it, either will work. If you wait a while, Midway usually puts the Buckmaster 6-18 mildot on sale for about 300. It has target turrets and the adjustment is 1/8 MOA. Nice scope in your price range. Also allows you to make adjustments when you are punching paper and have the time to adjust.

Its MIL sweet spot is right at 12 power

runway1
08-04-2011, 7:19 AM
Yeah, I see your point. I'm looking at the 4.5-14 now. A good thought, if I ever want bigger. Thanks.

McCrown
08-04-2011, 10:10 AM
If you could come up a little in price and don't have a base yet I would say a 10 MOA base with a Nikon monarch 4-16x42. The turrets are better, they are adjustable and keep track of the revolutions when adjusting. With a 10 MOA base you should have enough adjustment to get a 100 yd zero and be able to take it out beyond 800 yds. Plus the monarch has much better glass than the buckmaster.

McCrown
08-04-2011, 10:14 AM
Also, forgot to mention for matching turrets/reticle the lowest to play in that game is around $700+ for a quality optic. I think the best budget choice for that is the Vortex Viper PST series.