PDA

View Full Version : lets talk scales


anotherted
01-11-2007, 8:09 PM
Im tired of messing with my beam scale and am going to get a digi scale. Im pretty much set on a RCBS charge master 1500. Seems to get excellent reviews all around and I like the idea that you can add the automated powder measure later.

Any reason to talk me out of it?

bloodtrail
01-11-2007, 8:56 PM
Im tired of messing with my beam scale and am going to get a digi scale. Im pretty much set on a RCBS charge master 1500. Seems to get excellent reviews all around and I like the idea that you can add the automated powder measure later.

Any reason to talk me out of it?
i am with you dude it seems if you breath on a beam scale it throws of the calibration or if your bench is not straight....digi scales in gun catalogs or web sites are too pricey for me instead i bought mine at a jewrly supply and saved quite a bit....

Whitesmoke
01-11-2007, 10:36 PM
What beam scales are you guys having trouble with......?

I never have trouble with my RCBS 5-10 scale......but my Lee scale sucked.

anyracoon
01-12-2007, 6:05 AM
I used a RCBS 5-0-5 scale for years, than bought a RCBS midrange electronic. Last year I bought the Pact scale/dispensor combo, which used to make the RCBS stuff. It is nice to tell it 25.3 grns of Varget and it does it automatically while your seating a bullet on current shell. Bythe time you finish the next charge is all ready to load.

TonyM
01-12-2007, 8:38 AM
I used a RCBS 5-0-5 scale for years, than bought a RCBS midrange electronic. Last year I bought the Pact scale/dispensor combo, which used to make the RCBS stuff. It is nice to tell it 25.3 grns of Varget and it does it automatically while your seating a bullet on current shell. Bythe time you finish the next charge is all ready to load.


I've got the PACT also, and it's great.

30Cal
01-12-2007, 9:32 AM
I've got an RCBS 5-0-5 and an electronic scale. The beam scale is drop-dead repeatable, doesn't wander, and at a glance I can tell if the charge is high or low, even before it's finished damping. It also doesn't need time to warm up.

I use the electronic only when I occasionally decide to cull brass or bullets.

I had a Lee scale and decided to order a better one about 10 minutes after I took it out of the box.

Ty

halifax
01-12-2007, 11:13 AM
I've got an RCBS 5-0-5 and an electronic scale. The beam scale is drop-dead repeatable, doesn't wander, and at a glance I can tell if the charge is high or low, even before it's finished damping. It also doesn't need time to warm up.

I use the electronic only when I occasionally decide to cull brass or bullets.

I had a Lee scale and decided to order a better one about 10 minutes after I took it out of the box.

Ty

I too, thought a digital scale would be better. I bought the RCBS Min-Pro. It has a really bad habit of automatically re-zeroing itself if the un-ladened pan is within +/- 0.2 gr. This can be really annoying when working with handgun cartridge weights. I went back to the trusty RCBS 5-0-5.

anotherted
01-12-2007, 11:42 AM
I've found it faster to throw a charge into a scale pan with a Uniflow set below my desired charged and trickle in the right amount of powder to get the desired weight.

Thats exactly what i plan on doing. I already do it with my beam scale but it takes ages for the beam to settle. this is why im looking for a digi scale.

ETA: Just bought the RCBS 1500.

50BMGBOB
01-12-2007, 1:07 PM
Electric scales can drift with battery level or line voltage variances. I use a computer UPS with a line filter (and nothing else plugged in to it) to power mine. If it is battery powered, try lithium batterys. I have a Dillon scale but want to get a Denver Instruments scale. They have a MXX123 that runs about $250. They people I know with them say that they don't drift. Maybe when my tax return gets here.

LCAZES
01-12-2007, 2:44 PM
Electronic scales are only accurate to +/- 0.1 grain, sometimes +/- 0.2 grains. Same as beam balance scales and in my experience slower. A slight jostle of the bench, or an errant breeze can throw off the readings.



You get what you pay for in scales or any other precision equipment. I have a digital scale from Uniqetek that is accurate to within .02 grains. This is NOT uncommon if you research scales from the companies that make them and not reloading suppliers who only resell them. If the scale is on an unstable surface or in a drafty area, it will drift. Changes in ambient temp will also cause drift.

30Cal
01-12-2007, 7:33 PM
You get what you pay for in scales or any other precision equipment. I have a digital scale from Uniqetek that is accurate to within .02 grains. This is NOT uncommon if you research scales from the companies that make them and not reloading suppliers who only resell them. If the scale is on an unstable surface or in a drafty area, it will drift. Changes in ambient temp will also cause drift.

You can pay for it, but it doesn't mean that it buys you anything.

Here's what you get when I take the powder charge that falls out of my measure (+/- 0.3grs). I did cull brass though--this group was shot with the "rejects" (heavier or lighter than by more than 1.0grs from the average weight).

10rds, prone, iron sights, 100yds.
http://webpages.charter.net/tyoberg/upload/125tnt%20prone100yds.jpg

Ty