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StevieG
08-01-2011, 11:51 AM
I was wondering if it is similar to the ASVAB, and how to prepare for it.
Any input is much appreciated.

ankyle62
08-01-2011, 12:06 PM
Make sure your grammar, and spelling are up to par. It's not that bad.

The Bacon Eater
08-01-2011, 12:48 PM
When i took mine it was in essay format. Grammar, spelling, and punctuation are key to passing.

biochembruin
08-01-2011, 2:15 PM
It is three essay questions. Things similar to, "Name one person who you respect, and discuss why," "List a choice you made which you regret and, and discuss why," "List an instance you had a conflict with someone and discuss how you dealt with it," or "Name one historical person you would like to meet, and discuss why."

Use a standard essay format: intro paragraph, paragraph for each point supporting your position (2-3 paragraphs), and a conclusion paragraph. A good tip is "tell them what you're going to tell them (intro), then tell them (body of essay),then tell them what you told them (conclusion). They're looking for grammar and the clear and coherent communication of an idea. They don't care that you want to meet Abraham Lincoln, but want to see that you can support your reasoning.

There will not be questions asking if you would write your mom a ticket, or other police procedures for which you have no experience.

Good luck, we need more good cops out there.

ankyle62
08-01-2011, 2:31 PM
I dont believe it's appropriate to tell exactly what is on the test and I believe they tell you not to.

Tacit Blue
08-01-2011, 2:37 PM
Unless they made you sign a non disclosure statement like Border Patrol, it's not classified or proprietary information. My friend says in BP they ask you in the poly if you've disclosed testing information or oral to anyone, as part of the integrity check. So back to the disclosure statement, if you didn't sign anything its free game!

besides, passing a written isn't the hard part. It's the background investigation that DQ's 90% of the people along the way...

HAVOC5150
08-01-2011, 2:44 PM
I took it about 10 years ago and passed, never followed through because I already had a job. I was doing it with a friend to support him. It seemed pretty easy to me, though there was a portion that was opinion questions almost like a psych eval. But spelling, grammar and memory are all part of the test.

biochembruin
08-01-2011, 2:53 PM
There are probably two dozen questions they could ask on the written test, and they don't care about discussing the questions. Besides the fact the test is offered 5 days a week, and you can take more than once times, so in effect you can become familiar with the format in short order. Also, the Dept has several programs to help with the physical, written, and interview portions of the application, as well as Dept Mentors to answer any questions.

Check out http://www.joinlapd.com/application.html for more details on the test, as well as various prep programs.

TrailerparkTrash
08-01-2011, 6:34 PM
I was wondering if it is similar to the ASVAB, and how to prepare for it.
Any input is much appreciated.

The Armed Services Vocational Apptitude Battery (ASVAB) test doesn't even come close to the LA City or LA County entry tests. i think the ASVAB is more difficult (which is really really sad).

For LA City or County, their tests are very similar. Make sure you understand reading comprehension and can spell. That's it. I'll add one more thing for the County version of the test.... Make sure you have a pulse and you'll probably pass!!!!! :D:D:D:D

(Hint: both tests are a joke. ) I know because I'm county and my wife is City.

retired
08-01-2011, 8:28 PM
Heck, when I applied many moons ago, I slept overnight in the auditorium at Roosevelt High School because they only accepted 500 applicants at 3 different locations.

I then stood in a very long line waiting to give them my name and then take the test. After 1 1/2 hours in line I came to the front and was told since I had a B.A. degree, the written test was waived for me.:eek: I sure wish they had done that differently as I was late to my job.

I guess it would be safe to say from what I've read here, they don't do that anymore (waive the test I mean).

Ford8N
08-14-2011, 9:54 AM
There are probably two dozen questions they could ask on the written test, and they don't care about discussing the questions. Besides the fact the test is offered 5 days a week, and you can take more than once times, so in effect you can become familiar with the format in short order. Also, the Dept has several programs to help with the physical, written, and interview portions of the application, as well as Dept Mentors to answer any questions.

Check out http://www.joinlapd.com/application.html for more details on the test, as well as various prep programs.

Wow, that's quite a rigorous application process.

"Conditions such as bipolar disorder, recurring major depression, with or without psychotic features or suicidal ideation, recurring anxiety disorders, with or without panic attacks, obsessive/compulsive disorder, and most diagnoses leading to a psychiatric hospitalization require review of relevant medical records. These conditions are frequently accompanied by functional limitations that are difficult to manage, and as a result, tend to result in a psychological disqualification. . Be assured, each candidate receives an individualized assessment of his or her unique circumstances, and no condition or diagnosis is automatically disqualifying." :eek: You telling me that a candidate can still have a chance if they are a nut case! LAPD must really be hard up for recruits.

tyrist
08-14-2011, 11:23 AM
Wow, that's quite a rigorous application process.

"Conditions such as bipolar disorder, recurring major depression, with or without psychotic features or suicidal ideation, recurring anxiety disorders, with or without panic attacks, obsessive/compulsive disorder, and most diagnoses leading to a psychiatric hospitalization require review of relevant medical records. These conditions are frequently accompanied by functional limitations that are difficult to manage, and as a result, tend to result in a psychological disqualification. . Be assured, each candidate receives an individualized assessment of his or her unique circumstances, and no condition or diagnosis is automatically disqualifying." :eek: You telling me that a candidate can still have a chance if they are a nut case! LAPD must really be hard up for recruits.

They are saying they will review all documentation to make sure you are fairly disqualified. If you are a "nut case" you have zero chance. Guess you have never heard of the ADA. You need to prove you fairly treated them prior to disqualification in case you are sued.

biochembruin
08-14-2011, 11:29 AM
What he said. It just means they have to review and then disqualify you, as opposed to disqualifying you without review.

FourLoko
08-14-2011, 11:59 AM
Heck, when I applied many moons ago, I slept overnight in the auditorium at Roosevelt High School because they only accepted 500 applicants at 3 different locations.

I then stood in a very long line waiting to give them my name and then take the test. After 1 1/2 hours in line I came to the front and was told since I had a B.A. degree, the written test was waived for me.:eek: I sure wish they had done that differently as I was late to my job.

I guess it would be safe to say from what I've read here, they don't do that anymore (waive the test I mean).

wish they still had the BA waiver

I have no desire to take another essay test (passed it once already)

StevieG
08-25-2011, 6:49 AM
Another question gents (actually two :) ), from what I know the passing score is 70, what is considered a good score?
Also, how many points will they add for being enlisted in the Army Reserve?
Thanks in advance.

CapnHawk
08-27-2011, 12:04 AM
When I tested, you got a written exam waiver for having just an A.A. degree.

Sudaev
08-31-2011, 1:42 AM
Does anyone remember the old LA County Sheriff's exam? I took it around 1987 and there were a good 200+ people in attendance; I'm certain that less than half passed. It was a lengthy test and included what people used to refer to as "the flags test", referring to the portion where you had to decipher some semaphore graphics. I believe the flags part may have measured IQ.

LAPD at least as late as the 60s had a requirement that applicants have at least a 110 IQ. I realize that's not exactly genius material but it shows you how things have been dumbed down.

Code3TacticalGear.com
08-31-2011, 2:42 AM
The test consists of 3 essays and you get 10 extra points if you were in the Military.

DavidRSA
08-31-2011, 11:27 AM
All the written tests I have taken for various agencies and other jobs I have been getting top grades. I passed the CA bar exam. BUT.... I failed the LAPD written test. I know I have at least a basic command of the English language, so it was a bit of a surprise. I wish I knew why I failed it. Perhaps I was too wordy, or too long winded, hell it could even have been my somewhat messy handwriting. I have to wait 6 months until my next attempt, I will write it again in November.

submaniac
08-31-2011, 1:05 PM
OK, I am not LAPD, but the girlfriend who is next to me as I type this (and apparently wants to share her opinion but is too lazy to create her own account) is LAPD for 12+ years and is telling me to say that what they are looking for is whether the applicant understands proper essay structure including introduction, body, and conclusion with proper spelling. She says to pick up a book to refresh on how to compose a proper essay, and says she recommends it prior to taking the test. The questions are usually NOT law enforcement related. And the two most difficult parts of the process are the psychological and polygraph/backgrounds.

The GF says that now is a great time to apply and the department could be hiring up to 800 people.

retired
08-31-2011, 2:09 PM
Does anyone remember the old LA County Sheriff's exam? I took it around 1987 and there were a good 200+ people in attendance; I'm certain that less than half passed. It was a lengthy test and included what people used to refer to as "the flags test", referring to the portion where you had to decipher some semaphore graphics. I believe the flags part may have measured IQ.

LAPD at least as late as the 60s had a requirement that applicants have at least a 110 IQ. I realize that's not exactly genius material but it shows you how things have been dumbed down.

I took my test with LASD in 1975, but I can't remember anything about it because it's been too long. They hired me in 1976 and I worked for them for 27yrs., so I must have passed it.:D

CapnHawk, that may have been the case back in 1975 also and I had one of those also. They just said I was exempted because of the degree and I wish they had just posted that so we could just turn our paperwork in when we first arrived there the day before.

bRiT636
08-31-2011, 2:54 PM
Another question gents (actually two :) ), from what I know the passing score is 70, what is considered a good score?
Also, how many points will they add for being enlisted in the Army Reserve?
Thanks in advance.

85 is a good pass, I know for a while any less than 75 was not accepted.

bRiT636
08-31-2011, 2:55 PM
http://policebackground.net/Forum/

This place is a great resource, run a current backgrounds investigator.