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Tacit Blue
07-27-2011, 9:46 PM
Any of you gentlemen know where a Reserve lvl 1/Modular class is offered??

center_x
07-27-2011, 11:04 PM
Sac regional public training center

Tacit Blue
07-27-2011, 11:08 PM
Too far.. I'm in the San Diego area. I figured out O.C Sheriff's Academy/ Santa Ana Public Safety center has it.. I know O.C is one of the toughest in the state. Anywhere else closer?

tom2
07-28-2011, 3:44 AM
I'm in NorCal and don't know how much of help the following will be.....



Southwestern College Basic Academy
900 Otay Lakes Road, Rm 560J
Chula Vista, CA 91910

San Bernardino County Sheriff's Regional Public Safety Training Center
P. O. Box 1456
San Bernardino, CA 92402

Riverside County Sheriff's Department - Ben Clark Training Center
3423 Davis Avenue, Dept. A
Riverside, CA 92518

Notorious
07-28-2011, 6:32 AM
It's going to be tough for ya. Rio Hondo in whittier had it and I know valley college in san bernardino has the extended full academy but oc is a lot closer than either one for you.

Digital_Boy
07-29-2011, 5:35 PM
Miramar doesn't? Also, noob question, what's the difference between a modular and standard academy? Does modular denote an academy that is broken down into smaller segments more suitable for those already working full time to attend and get their POST certifications?

Tacit Blue
07-29-2011, 5:50 PM
Miramar doesn't? Also, noob question, what's the difference between a modular and standard academy? Does modular denote an academy that is broken down into smaller segments more suitable for those already working full time to attend and get their POST certifications?

All above the above. Grossmont college offers it. Miramar offers a full basic.. A modular academy operates in a level tier system. Level III-II-I, level I is the same as a regular Peace Officer, which is considered a regular academy graduate/Officer.

Notorious
07-29-2011, 9:21 PM
The full time academy is 664 hours, and the modular format breaks the hours up into separate modules so you can take it in parts instead of going six and a half months straight through.

Digital_Boy
07-29-2011, 10:28 PM
The full time academy is 664 hours, and the modular format breaks the hours up into separate modules so you can take it in parts instead of going six and a half months straight through.

Cool. That's what I thought, you, Tacit Blue and Google confirmed my hypothesis. And I saw Grossmont College down in the southeastern part of SD does a modular academy, but they've stopped offering the level 1 module, which I'm guessing Tacit Blue had already discovered before he posted.

Kind of bites since SD county needs all the LEOs it can get, fulltime or reserve, and having more academies offering modular options would help. I've been considering putting myself through an academy as a volunteer, and this thread answered a question I hadn't asked : is there a part time academy for adults working full time jobs. It also pointed out how difficult it's going to be living in SD county too. :rolleyes:

Tacit Blue
07-29-2011, 11:10 PM
Cool. That's what I thought, you, Tacit Blue and Google confirmed my hypothesis. And I saw Grossmont College down in the southeastern part of SD does a modular academy, but they've stopped offering the level 1 module, which I'm guessing Tacit Blue had already discovered before he posted.

Kind of bites since SD county needs all the LEOs it can get, fulltime or reserve, and having more academies offering modular options would help. I've been considering putting myself through an academy as a volunteer, and this thread answered a question I hadn't asked : is there a part time academy for adults working full time jobs. It also pointed out how difficult it's going to be living in SD county too. :rolleyes:

Actually SD County Sheriff's the only that's really hiring alot of People right now, (along with SDPD) they have the new budget approved. Another cool thing about a modular academy is, that when you complete a level of training. You get a certificate for it, which means you'll never have to retake it again. So if something happens down the road at level 2 or 1, you won't have to take the whole academy over again like a regular full basic. I.E being medically injured.

Just something to consider. Being a reserve and building a relationship in terms of your work ethics, is a good way for an agency to hire you on later on. All they would have to do is add you onto the payroll as a full time Officer. If you were to attend Grossmont, you would graduate at level 2. Then seek level 1 at Orange County Sheriff's Training facility ( Santa Ana College). Or goto Palomar College for their extended Police academy program. And complete everything there.

The choice is yours, but the quickest way is to attend San Diego regional academy. Which is 6 months long, high speed and full time.

Notorious
07-30-2011, 6:41 AM
Actually, it's a little more involved in the transition between reserve and regular than just adding you to payroll so they cut you a check instead of just a wave and a thanks. POST mandates an updated background so you have to account for the time in between being hired as a reserve and now. Your department may require some other things... Then you have all the internal stuff for HR... Real boring stuff, but stuff nonetheless. I've been through it, that's why I know.

Tallship
07-30-2011, 8:52 AM
From the Grossmont website: Those interested in attending Level I would have to travel to Riverside or Palm Desert to get the Module I modular training.

AR15Kimo
08-01-2011, 4:26 PM
Might be too far for you, but Victor Valley College will be offering level 1 in early 2012 at their new facility in Apple Valley. I will be attending their first class. ( currently in level 2).

State of the art equipment from what they say.

good luck

Jamez
08-02-2011, 11:12 PM
Here's the post catalog.
http://catalog.post.ca.gov/SearchResult.aspx?category=Entry+Level

it'll tell you who's offering what classes. I love this thing :-)

TheExpertish
08-03-2011, 5:10 PM
I put myself through Palomar. Personally, finding a reserve position is not easy anymore. It's due to departments cuts, lack of need, and most departments want to see a full academy and have hopes of going to a full-time position. I would recommend against putting yourself through regional at Miramar. Walk-on cadets have a stigma and have a much much lower success rate of getting hired than one of the extended format academies such as the ones at Palomar, Grossmont, and Southwestern.

Tacit Blue
08-03-2011, 7:18 PM
I put myself through Palomar. Personally, finding a reserve position is not easy anymore. It's due to departments cuts, lack of need, and most departments want to see a full academy and have hopes of going to a full-time position. I would recommend against putting yourself through regional at Miramar. Walk-on cadets have a stigma and have a much much lower success rate of getting hired than one of the extended format academies such as the ones at Palomar, Grossmont, and Southwestern.

I'm actually torn between Palomar and Grossmont. I had a friend who went to Palomar and he says it's top notch, and that the TO Jackson is a mean ole SOB.:D How was the stress level?? I know how Miramar academy operates as i've seen my friend go through it, is it pretty much the same? As in physically demanding? My friend makes it sound stressful, i don't think there's anyway its more so than the San Diego Regional.. Do they do the whole first 2 days of weeding out like Miramar? I'm just curious because my friend started with a group of 5 people at the PAT and none of them graduated..They were mostly medically DQ'd and one failed the shot gun course??

I also like the idea of a Modular format academy like Grossmont, I plan on working at least part time and attending the academy.

TheExpertish
08-03-2011, 11:11 PM
I'm actually torn between Palomar and Grossmont. I had a friend who went to Palomar and he says it's top notch, and that the TO Jackson is a mean ole SOB.:D How was the stress level?? I know how Miramar academy operates as i've seen my friend go through it, is it pretty much the same? As in physically demanding? My friend makes it sound stressful, i don't think there's anyway its more so than the San Diego Regional.. Do they do the whole first 2 days of weeding out like Miramar? I'm just curious because my friend started with a group of 5 people at the PAT and none of them graduated..They were mostly medically DQ'd and one failed the shot gun course??

I also like the idea of a Modular format academy like Grossmont, I plan on working at least part time and attending the academy.

Palomar is top notch. My class had a 75% hire rate and the academy's average is consistently high. Jackson can be mean, but is an excellent example of what a police officer should be. He's an 11-year USMC vet, and a K9 and SWAT officer with Escondido. He is my personal hero and I have great respect for him. Its low stress compared to Miramar and they don't try to weed people out. You're paying them whereas at Miramar the department paying for you wants to know if you're up for it right away. At Palomar they want you to succeed. My class started with 39. 30 of us walked on graduation day of which 9 were in uniform (already hired).

Palomar is an extended format academy which allows for keeping a full time job. It's run Tues-Thurs 5:30-10:30 if I remember, and all day Saturday for an entire year. It is a long but worthwhile commitment if you are serious about a career in LE. You end up with almost 1200 hours of training which makes you very desirable to potential departments. Palomar has an excellent reputation in the county and beyond and is heavily recruited from. Finding a job should not be a problem if you have your **** in order.

Tacit Blue
08-03-2011, 11:21 PM
Do you mind divulging what is on the written test?, i already filed my paperwork, took the assessment test. I know it's an essay, and there's a oral board also? What can you tell me about all the above, and how hard is the abilities test?

TheExpertish
08-04-2011, 8:52 AM
I honestly don't remember. I think it was simply asking you why you want to be a police officer. What they are looking for is how well you can write which is 98% of being an officer. If you had issues writing book reports in high school you may have an issue here.

Oral board consists of 3 of the staff and is a simple interview. Again, asking why you want to be a police officer and scenario questions, like "what would you do if...?" Much like the written test there are no right or wrong per se, but interested in your train of thought and how well you can articulate your reasons. In regards to being a police officer try to give them something other than the generic "I want to help people" answer. Physical agility test is fairly basic if you are in any shape what so ever. Most people failed at the wall climbs which require you to scale a 6 foot chain link and wooden walls. Keep in mind only 50% make it through each stage so the failure rate is high just to get to day one. On the day of the written test there were 250 applicants. My class started with 42 on orientation of which 39 showed back for day one. If you go to the website I think it gives more info on the tests for the physical agility.
http://www.palomar.edu/policeacademy/admission.html