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lazuris
01-02-2007, 3:06 PM
I'm a 100% newb to the reloading game. I've finally decided to start reloading my own rounds as i'm more into target/match shooting than i have been in the past. I also now have a decient collection of firearms that are starting to become a bit pricy to shoot on store bought stuff. I've been saving all my brass, as a build up to this, for the past several months. I'm looking to reload
.40, .45, .44 "i really want to get creative with this one", .308, .6mm, and .7-08.

I am open to all suggestions as to what type, brand and basic set of dies i need and so forth.

Thank you for your time

Alanski56
01-02-2007, 3:24 PM
I started with an RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Single Stage Press kit. I love it. You mentioned that you are new to this so my recomendation is to start with a single stage press and then graduate to a progressive if you feel the need. Most press manufacturer's single stage presses will accomodate a progressive set up as an accessory.

I'm sure people will disagree but for me, starting with a single stage press helped me to learn how to safely reload more easily. The basic difference between a single stage and a progressive is on a single stage you can only do one step at a time (resizing/depriming, priming, powder charging, bullet seating, etc. A progressive press will do four or five different functions (prime, charge, seat bullet, crimp, etc.) with each pull of the handle. I prefer the single stage because I have more control over each round. When I'm loading for optimum accuracy everything in the process must be repeated exactly the same from cartridge to cartridge. I also like to prime my brass using a hand priming tool so I can feel the primers seat and make sure they are seated deep enough in the primer pocket. I also individually weigh each powder charge when I load for my .308 and I weigh each 10th powder charge when I load .223. The single stage takes a lot longer to load a batch of rounds compared to a progressive so in a nut shell, a single stage is for beginners and for precise cartridge reloading and a progressive is for loading ammo in quantities over a short period of time. This is just scratching the surface. There is more to discuss. Give us more of an idea as to which way you are thinking about going and we can elaborate more specifically.

Have a nice day.

1911whore
01-02-2007, 3:26 PM
I havhe been reloading for about 10yrs and there are guys far more knowlegable than I but for your .308 reloader 15 is a good powder to work with and will accomodate most bullet weights. As far as the 44mag blue dot works well, for the .40 and .45 V V N340 is good for both and titegroup is a good .40 powder. Win 231 is good for both .40 and .45 as well as 9mm. Buy RCBS and go slow reload alot and have fun. What guns are you loading for and what area are you in. I am in the sacramento area and am more than willing to help. I would start single stage or turret style press so you can pay attention to each step go progressive later and keep the single stage for precision rifle stuff. Start low and expieriment within the book loads to see what works best and I had alot of success early on with lead reloads in 9mm and .45 and saved a ton of money in the process and the ammo was more accurate than I could buy at the store. It is addicting.

Alanski56
01-02-2007, 3:37 PM
I'll second that Mr. Whore! Reloading is addicting.

I live in the San Jose area myself so if your in this area Lazuris, my offer to help is the same as Mr. Whore's.

On a side note, if you are loading your .308 or if you start loading .223 for semi-autos, RCBS has a cool set of dies called Small Base X Dies. The small base sizes the brass a hair smaller in diameter so they will always easily extract and the X Die allows you to only have to trim each lot of brass once. The way it works is you full length resize the first time and then trim .020 shorter on the over all case length. The X die will then prevent the brass from stretching beyond the case OAL for the life of the brass. If you go the single stage route like I do, eliminating the trim/chamfer/deburr step after doing it the first time is most welcome.

Have a nice day.

dw1784
01-02-2007, 4:38 PM
good point Alanski. I've read about the small base dies and was thinking about getting them if I ever reload for my AR's. I'm new to reloading also, and so far I've done 308 for my bolty's using Lee's neck sizing dies. Now if only I can find an outfit that doesn't charge an arm and a leg for s/h+hazardous...:)

lazuris
01-02-2007, 7:10 PM
Thanks for the help guys. I live in Socal and people have recomended a place call the stockade as a good place to start. I went to fowlers gun room, my favorite store in my area and they recomended the stockade. I know that they own that place but i have to say that the people in Fowlers seem to be the nicest group of guys sales people i know.

eckerph
01-02-2007, 7:15 PM
Use the search feature, this has been covered before.

Alanski56
01-03-2007, 12:51 PM
Good afternoon Lazuris,

After you check pricing locally I highly recommend that you go on the internet and check pricing from Midway USA, MidSouth Shooter's Supply and Natchez Shooter's Supply. The only item I purchase locally are primers. Everything else is way to expensive in the Bay Area compared to the three outfits mentioned above.

dw1784,

I hear you about the shipping and Haz-Mat. If you're not already, I suggest getting on the e-mailing list of as many suppliers as possible. Occasionally they will e-mail coupons. When I need to order powder I wait for one of these coupons or a discount on their Haz-Mat charge and then I order my .223/.308 powder in 8 lb quantities. It's like getting 3 lbs free compared to local pricing. I caution you not to order powder and primers together, however. The powder and primers have to be shipped in separate boxes therefore incurring 2 Haz-Mat charges. That's why I purchase my primers locally.

Have a nice day.

sargenv
01-03-2007, 1:13 PM
Hazmat isn't always separate for powder and primers. Midway has it set up that way, but other sellers sometimes do not. The best thing to do is try to go in with other shooters for a large order so that hazmat and shipping will cost only an additional $1 or $1.50 a pound of powder or k of primers.

Vince

Alanski56
01-03-2007, 1:44 PM
I wish I knew some other reloaders that I could do this with but unfortunately, I do not. I see that you live in the SF Bay Area and so do I. If you do something like this would you consider adding me to your contact list?

Have a nice day.

Fjold
01-03-2007, 1:54 PM
JMHO

If you are going to do 6 or so calibers I would advise you to get a turret press rather than a single stage, changing out three dies everytime you want to load one specific cartridge gets to be a PITA after awhile.

Single stage presses if they are built 100% inline, will produce higher quality ammunition for precision shooting, if you are using match prepped brass and components in match cut chambers, in match barrels on blue printed actions. Alot of people talk about bullet concentricity, etc for single stage presses but fail to take into account that with the typical factory cut chamber their ammunition will never need that .0001-.0005" of precision.

The simple act of installing and unscrewing the dies every time you need to change them will introduce as much error as a turret will.

phil conrad
01-04-2007, 10:55 AM
Thanks for the help guys. I live in Socal and people have recomended a place call the stockade as a good place to start. I went to fowlers gun room, my favorite store in my area and they recomended the stockade. I know that they own that place but i have to say that the people in Fowlers seem to be the nicest group of guys sales people i know.
You might want to also try the reloading store at the Angeles range. I have found them to very helpful and knowledgeable.

MisterDudeManGuy
01-04-2007, 6:10 PM
I'm sure people will disagree but for me, starting with a single stage press helped me to learn how to safely reload more easily.

I agree. Start slow. Be careful. After all, we're talking about stuff that can blow up! :eek: A turret with no progressive does allow the multi-caliber setup, though, which is handy. I wouldn't do a Dillon or other progressive until you get more experience. But that's just me.

xrMike
01-04-2007, 8:10 PM
Lee Classic Turret Press!

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v84/xrMike/guns/ReloadTableSetup.jpg