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brentylax
07-08-2011, 4:09 PM
I started looking at ridiculous hunting rifles recently and decided on one I really like but the price is crazy. I was looking at a Macmillian outdoorsman chambered in a .338 Lapua with 2x25 Swarovski optics w/ turets. It's going to run me 7,000. If you had to buy one hunting rifle with that kind of budget what would you buy?

FLIGHT762
07-08-2011, 4:46 PM
Just remember, you have to carry it around all day. I don't know what the MacMillan weighs. When I got older, I prefer the lighter hunting rifles, somewhere between 6-7 lbs. W/O optics.

.338 Lapua is a very efficient cartridge, but overkill for all but the largest Game on the North American Continent (Moose, Elk, Grizzly). It could be used for Deer, Pig and Antelope with the right bullets ( 200 gr. Barnes TSX). I'm a fan of .338 caliber.

I use:
.223 Rem. for Varmints
.260 Rem. Mountain Rifle for Pigs, Deer, Antelope.
.270 Winchester for same as above.
338/06 for big game
.358 Winchester for big game.

If you have the money, get it.

brando
07-08-2011, 5:15 PM
Yeah, it's not ideal for hunting unless you're dropping elk at 1400 yards. However, if hunting with suppressors was legal, subsonic .338LM with big hunting bullets is very practical (ask the Finns).

jcaoloveshine
07-08-2011, 5:19 PM
Unless you're going to hunt EVERYTHING in North America, a 308 will suit you fine for all game in CA.

I mean, largest game we have here is elk/black bear? 308 is fine for both, 180gr softpoints should be fine.

Unless you're hunting in CA from like 1000 yards away, standard hunting of any game in CA can be achieved with a 308/.30-06 and it will run you FAR FAR less money, which leaves you more for ammo. A lot more, like thousands of dollars.

brando
07-08-2011, 6:08 PM
Not to hijack this thread, but for you hunters out there you owe it to yourselves to plan a trip to New Zealand at some point. The hunting/countryside here is unbelievable.

cocorador
07-08-2011, 9:39 PM
I would have GA Precision rifles build me up a medium weight rifle on their Templar magnum action in 300 win/7mm magnum on a Mcmillan HTG stock. That would probably run around $ 3800 or so, rings around $200 and a scope- sky is the limit. I would say around $5500 for the GAP with a Swarovski hunting scope and money for ammo. Just my opinion though. I like the 338 Lapua and own several. I think a 300 win or 7mm mag is an excellent place to start for a custom rig. JMHO

dfletcher
07-08-2011, 10:24 PM
I started looking at ridiculous hunting rifles recently and decided on one I really like but the price is crazy. I was looking at a Macmillian outdoorsman chambered in a .338 Lapua with 2x25 Swarovski optics w/ turets. It's going to run me 7,000. If you had to buy one hunting rifle with that kind of budget what would you buy?

Well were it me I'd save about $2,500.00 and buy an HS Precision Takedown with a 300 RUM barrel and a 375 RUM barrel, each with a brake. Add a scope for about $1K and you've got two guns and a great scope for less than the 338 LM.

brentylax
07-09-2011, 9:26 AM
Perhaps I should've specified I'm buying the gun for elk. Specifically I was frustrated last year becasue I saw elkzilla at about 650yds and couldnt get close enough with my 30.06. Before anyone says it yes I know you could probably make that shot but I really didnt feel comfortable shooting that far especially with an elevation change (I was on a steep hill). I really like GA precision I nearly bought one but they are running a 12mo wait right now and macmillian can do it in 3-4 plus i get there little 2 day shooting course. I love HS as well but i feel like a takedown rifle would be kind of ridiculous to carry in the field. We've all seen that guy who shows up to hunt camp with a super tactical Ar-10. He usually eats by himself. Anywho I appreciate the feed back fellas.

gun toting monkeyboy
07-09-2011, 9:37 AM
.338 Lapua for elk? Seriously? You show up in the camp, and you will not only be eating alone, but they will all be snickering at you behind your back. Have you ever schlepped that heavy of a gun around for any length of time? Your .30-06 is more than enough for elk. Rather than dropping $7k on a rifle that shoots incredibly expensive, hard to find ammo, why not spend the money on more ammo for the -06 to practice, and then book yourself a really good guided hunt. For that much money, you should be able to get a bison, several bears, and a couple of elk to boot.

-Mb

Richard Erichsen
07-09-2011, 6:36 PM
I started looking at ridiculous hunting rifles recently and decided on one I really like but the price is crazy. I was looking at a Macmillian outdoorsman chambered in a .338 Lapua with 2x25 Swarovski optics w/ turets. It's going to run me 7,000. If you had to buy one hunting rifle with that kind of budget what would you buy?

What exactly are you planning to hunt and at what ranges? If the rifle is $4000-$5000, the scope alone is probably close to $4000. How proficient are you with any high power rifle at ranges exceeding 1000 yards - the purpose for this type of rifle and caliber?

My main question would be what's the plan? Every shot you fire will cost between $5 and $8 and the recoil is going to be brutal. I'd wager you'll find few if any opportunities to field it and even fewer opportunities to legitimately hunt with it. Your shoulder may stop you from putting more than a few dozen rounds though it in a session, which may put a damper on practice.

Wherever I see super-duper magnums referred to, it's often true the hunter in question would be a lot better off with something in a more common caliber. What rifles do you already own that might be complimented with a longer range/flatter shooting caliber? Whats the maximum range you've ever hunted game within successfully and in what sort of terrain?

R

ArmyMedicMoose
07-09-2011, 6:51 PM
I'm looking at 300 rum. I did a lot of research and I have come to decide that 300 rum works for me. One any 700 mag receiver works. ammo easier and cheaper to reload.

Noobert
07-09-2011, 7:05 PM
http://operatorchan.org/k/arch/src/k117694_338%20lm%20five%20dollar%20bills.jpg

ICHIYA TRAINING CONCEPTS
07-09-2011, 7:25 PM
IMHO I feel the same way as many others do, I think the 338lm is overkill for the game you want to take down. If I were you I would look at 300win mag. As from personal experiance has told me that is more then enough for elk.

Also I have gone on a hunt with a tactical rifle. The added weight u are carrying around does not make the hunt any more fun. Did that on a white tail hunt, carrying a gap m40.

ITC

brentylax
07-20-2011, 11:18 AM
Ok so I got the Rifle specs. Total weight with 5x25 optics is 8lbs. I got a muzzle break so kick will be manageable. It seems as though alot of people are balking at the ammo price but truthfully if you pay a couple grand for an out of state hunt who cares if you shoot 20 dollars worth of ammo during the hunt. This is not a couch commando gun. I will never go to the range and blow through 200 rounds. I do however think that buying a 300 win mag would've been the smartest decision. I will never fire at game over 1000yds, I will never be good enough nor is that actually a good idea. However I do like the idea of being able to kill Elk at 750yds with ease. Thanks everybody for the input.

NorCalAthlete
07-20-2011, 11:26 AM
A 10 lb rifle isn't much to carry around. A good sling makes a big difference as well. To train/practice, go ruck marching for a few hours / several miles with a 50lb rucksack on your back. That rifle will feel like a great relief the next time you go hunting.

Longest I've done was a 25 mile ruck march with a 45 lb ruck and about another 60 lbs of body armor and ammo, + my weapon, in combat boots and in freezing temperatures. Taking a 10+ lb rifle on a hunt is a pleasant walk. It's just a matter of comparison.

Black Majik
07-20-2011, 11:34 AM
8 lbs all said and done is pretty dang good. What's the specs on the rifle?

Sicarius
07-20-2011, 11:42 AM
How far do you plan to be shooting your game? 338 is an awesome round but hardly necessary for hunting. 7mm mag would be better IMO. I am all for expensive toys but to be carrying a heavy and very expensive rifle to get banged around the woods, 338 wouldn't be my first choice.
Kevin

gun toting monkeyboy
07-20-2011, 11:51 AM
It is not the ammo price that most people are balking at. It is the idea of spending close to $10k on something that is so massively over-powered for hunting that it is almost a joke. Have you ever actually hunted for elk before? Do you have any idea what is involved in such a hunt? The rifle is actually a much smaller part of any hunt than you would think. And last time I checked, the elk don't come with ablative ceramic plates hidden under their skins. There are people who hunt them regularly who are perfectly happy using their .243 Winchester. And you want to take an incredibly expensive, heavy, unwieldy cannon out to shoot them from more than 7 football fields away? Be ready to be disappointed. Because you seem to be putting a lot of internet time in, and don't seem to be thinking about the real world. If you are not going to put in the hundreds of rounds worth of training shooting at targets out to 750 yards, you have no business shooting at game that far out. My .22 Long Rifle can be lethal out to a mile and a half, but you don't see me, or anybody else in their right mind hunting with it out that far. Instead of pounding your chest and saying that you need to have the biggest gun out there, even though you want to put a muzzle brake on it so it doesn't hurt your delicate shoulder, how about you do some research on how long the average shot is for elk, where ever it is you plan on hunting. Then put in the trigger time with a regular rifle to see if you can hit something out that far. And maybe you should also practice stalking. If 750 yards is as close as you can get to an elk, the gun may not be the problem. It may be time to take off the squeaky clown shoes and stop bathing in bear urine.

-Mb

whytea
07-20-2011, 11:56 AM
http://operatorchan.org/k/arch/src/k117694_338%20lm%20five%20dollar%20bills.jpg

+1

I had one, and to this day it's only gun I've ever sold. The only reason I had it was a trade on a car. I have no need to shoot grizzlies out at 1000+ yards. My .308 does everything I need.

Trapper
07-20-2011, 12:33 PM
As others have said the 338 Lapua is much more rifle than you need for hunting.
With that kind of budget I get an Ed Brown Savanna chambered in 280 Ackley improved. It's a 7.5lb rifle, custom built controlled round feed action, Stainless, #4 contor barrel, Jewell trigger, and Mc Millian stock for under $3900. Spend another $1,000 on rings bases and you'll be able to take anything in the lower 48.

brando
07-20-2011, 2:21 PM
Eight pounds? That's going to hurt to shoot, even with a brake.

hcbr
07-20-2011, 3:51 PM
I agree with everyone else, .338 is just overkill for hunting.

acaligunner
07-20-2011, 4:10 PM
If you want more bang for the buck there are 2 choice's that I see.

http://www.armalite.com/images/on%20page%20images%5Clarge%5C30M(1).jpg

For under 2k

Also this one.

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x26/300Whisper/0310091739.jpg

For around 3k

Ammo and nick-nacks are going to go for a premium price.

Excuse me if the pics are a little big.

acaligunner

NYY
07-20-2011, 4:18 PM
Not to hijack this thread, but for you hunters out there you owe it to yourselves to plan a trip to New Zealand at some point. The hunting/countryside here is unbelievable.

thanks to Bear Grylls, i can now vouch for you on the unbelievable countryside

brentylax
07-25-2011, 2:00 PM
@gun toting monkey: Aparently you're the only person that's ever been elk hunting before. Yes occasionally you glass a big valley and spot elk out at over 600yds and you can never get to them. It doesn't make you a bad hunter, these things called game herds move and sometimes when they move they are hard for people to catch on foot. As far as the claim that your .22 is leathal out to 1000yds, my response is you're an idiot. I'm not some couch commando you can talk down to because you went hunting once. The rest of your post doesn't make much sense either, I'm "pounding my chest" by buying a big gun but i'm a sally for buying a muzzle break? Kick rocks, I never claimed to be a tough guy. Instead of trying to belittle newer members you could try and provide helpful input.

gun toting monkeyboy
07-25-2011, 2:58 PM
I tried to provide helpful input, and you came back with some drivel about shooting elk at 750 yards. And yes, you are a couch commando, your posts prove it. I didn't have to do a danged thing to show that to anybody. That was all you.

As for the .22 being able to kill people at 1.5 miles, have you ever bothered to read the warnings on the boxes of ammunition? That is where I got that range. And they probably mentioned it in your hunter's safety class, which you were supposed to have taken before you got your license.

You aren't actually looking for real advise here. You wanted to come in to the forum, show off with comments about using a massively over-powered, incredibly expensive rifle, and have people go "Ohhhh, he's a man's man". Sorry, it ain't gonna happen. You came in, sounded like a noob, and didn't catch on when everybody said that you might want to rethink things. Then you made dumber statements, and now you are crying because people have called you on them. The first 5-6 posters saying that you didn't need a .338 for hunting should have been a clue. How about you sit down and take some time to think this through instead of getting ticked at me because I put on the Captain Obvious outfit and pointed out the folly of your posts. You can call me whatever names you want, it won't change anything. Ad hominem attacks against somebody who uses the screen name "gun toting monkeyboy" are pretty much pointless. It amuses me, and makes you look like an even bigger fool.

-Mb

Bhobbs
07-25-2011, 3:02 PM
The value of the rifle is only something you can determine. Would I buy a hunting weight .338 LM? No way. 1) I don't hunt and 2) I would chose a different caliber unless .338 LM was the best choice for what ever I was hunting.

If you are going to sit on a hill top and drop big animals at longer distances, then I would get a heavier rifle where the recoil won't be brutal. If you want a light weight rifle that you can walk around with I would pick a different round.

prerunners4life
07-25-2011, 3:39 PM
I have a armalite AR-30 in 338LM..

Awsome rifle, extremely accurate.. What more can u ask for?

And the gun won't break the bank..

mif_slim
07-25-2011, 3:50 PM
Yup, 338 is a over-kill for anything in the US. 300 is still over kill in my book but I havent hunted Elk/Griz/Moose so I have no need for one yet. I do however have 7mm rem mag and thats been giving me great results. Same with 06 and .223 which I mainly use.

If it was me, Rem700, Savage or Tikka 308 with a good set of glass and LOTS of ammo. :)

skkeeter
07-25-2011, 8:11 PM
You could get the Desert Tactical Arms SRS in .338 LM and the .308 conversion right in your budget. Best of both worlds.

Fjold
07-25-2011, 9:32 PM
Not to hijack this thread, but for you hunters out there you owe it to yourselves to plan a trip to New Zealand at some point. The hunting/countryside here is unbelievable.

Yep, been there like 10 times, one of my favorite countries.

To the OP, I hunt both long range and with large caliber guns. Hunting big game at 750 yards is not easy no matter what cartridge you use. Misjudge the distance by less than 10% and you can miss by feet or worse yet get a marginal wounding hit that means the animal wanders off to a slow death.

Can you judge the distance accurately between 700 and 800 yards up hill across a hidden draw and a couple of brush covered ridges?

The difference in drop between 700 and 800 yards is 5 feet! Is the animal at 725 yards or 775 yards? Guess wrong and you hit two feet low and break a front leg. Unless you misjudged the wind and drop one right through his stomach. In either case he'll run for miles and take three days to three weeks to die.

al8550
07-26-2011, 5:54 AM
Sounds a little pricey, but if you got the cash, why not?

ZX-10R
07-26-2011, 7:10 AM
I started looking at ridiculous hunting rifles recently and decided on one I really like but the price is crazy. I was looking at a Macmillian outdoorsman chambered in a .338 Lapua with 2x25 Swarovski optics w/ turets. It's going to run me 7,000. If you had to buy one hunting rifle with that kind of budget what would you buy?

That is a lot of money. Start a new hobby and get a year old ZX-10R or R1 for that kind of money.

Most i would spend on a gun is $3k and my AR is almost there.

brando
07-26-2011, 4:48 PM
That is a lot of money. Start a new hobby and get a year old ZX-10R or R1 for that kind of money.

Most i would spend on a gun is $3k and my AR is almost there.

Wow, really? I'm sure there are plenty who say the same thing about motorcycles, houses, etc. To each his own.

Black Majik
07-26-2011, 4:59 PM
It's funny this reminds me of a squid coming onto a motorcycle forum and inquiring about a hayabusa for their first bike. After everyone recommends going smaller the OP still insists on a Liter + bike. One word always comes to mind. Ouch.

OP if you do end up buying a 8 lbs .338LM rifle 1) Congratulations 2) Please post a video.

Maddog5150
07-26-2011, 6:43 PM
I'm about to get flamed but there is such a thing as ethical hunting. Shooting an animal at the distance that most people fantasize about with that caliber in my opinion is unethical in my opinion.
Lets say you hump your heavy *** rifle ten miles and finally see your elk, your wasted and tired and now you need to set up your bi pod and lay down, providing the elk is still there, you wing the critter at 800-1000 meters away. Are you going to cover that 800-1000 in rough tarrain BEFORE picking up the trail or are you just going to say screw it, leave it to bleed or fend and try to shoot something else? Mind you a wounded elk will still outrun you no matter what kind of shape you are in.

gun toting monkeyboy
07-26-2011, 10:31 PM
I'm about to get flamed but there is such a thing as ethical hunting. Shooting an animal at the distance that most people fantasize about with that caliber in my opinion is unethical in my opinion.
Lets say you hump your heavy *** rifle ten miles and finally see your elk, your wasted and tired and now you need to set up your bi pod and lay down, providing the elk is still there, you wing the critter at 800-1000 meters away. Are you going to cover that 800-1000 in rough tarrain BEFORE picking up the trail or are you just going to say screw it, leave it to bleed or fend and try to shoot something else? Mind you a wounded elk will still outrun you no matter what kind of shape you are in.

Nope. No flames from me. I passed up several hogs on my first hunt with my daughter a couple of months back. I could have hit them, but the shots were marginal at best. So we ended up getting nothing in terms of hogs, but she got a first class lesson in hunting ethics. It isn't always about getting the animal. If you were going to get one every time, it would be called "harvesting", not "hunting". And the true measure of a hunter is knowing when not to shoot. Shooting at an animal at a distance that you are unlikely to get a clean and humane kill is called slob hunting. And it gives the rest of us a bad name. Having a cannon that lets you shoot at things in the next county doesn't make you a better hunter. It just lets you screw up in a much more spectacular fashion. I am not saying that there aren't ethical hunters who shoot at animals at very long distances. There are. But they are the ones that put in hundreds, if not thousands of rounds getting ready for that kind of hunting. They are the ones that know EXACTLY how many feet a bullet will drop at a given distance. And most importantly, they are the ones that are wise enough to know when to pass on a long shot if it isn't right. They are not the ones that come in and think that their uber-expensive rifle is a magic talisman that will smite any animal they see simply because it is a .338 loudenboomer magnum plus.

-Mb

1911su16b870
07-27-2011, 9:52 AM
338 LM when you absolutely, positively need to engage that target out at > 1000 meters :D

brentylax
07-27-2011, 10:13 AM
Monkey boy I actually agree with your post about ethical shots/ long range hunting. If you remeber at the begining of the post my whole reason for wanting a .338 bazooka was that I didn't think it was ethical for me to take a shot with my 30.06 at over 600yds. Its certaintly possible and "the warning on the box" would tell you its lethal out to that range but any experinced hunter knows that the round drops too much at that range to be predictable. I wanted a .338 lapua so that I could comfortably shoot out to 750yds, which I feel is an ethical distance for an experinced shooter with a large caliber magnum. I'm also not sure where this notion comes from that the only way to learn distance shooting is with thousands of rounds. I'm planning on expending 100 practice rounds while taking instruction from a friend who learned distance shooting in the armed services. Why is a 338 overkill? Yes a smaller caliber could kill the animal but in the same regard i've seen elk take 4 rounds center mass and take off running, only to later discover that that they had been heart shot and double lunged. Monkeyboy I heard what you said about smaller calibers and even acknowledged that a 300 win mag would've been a smarter purchase, Is it about being right or helpful?

WHITE MAMBA
07-27-2011, 10:27 AM
Take a look at the TRG42 , bare bones they go for around $2600. I hunt with my .338, its heavy but i dont care. Costs a little over $2 to reload. If you got the coin do it, be happy

d4v0s
07-27-2011, 10:49 AM
I'm planning on expending 100 practice rounds while taking instruction from a friend who learned distance shooting in the armed services.

You are completely doomed to fail, and i feel bad for whatever animal you wound...

Maddog5150
07-27-2011, 11:05 AM
^^^^^^
werd

gun toting monkeyboy
07-27-2011, 11:31 AM
How about you ask Fjold how many rounds he shoots at long distance targets. Or any of the other long range shooters on here. 100 rounds is nothing. An afternoon's worth of training. And how are you going to be able to practice for all of the variables you are likely to run into in the real world? Shooting up or down hill will change where the bullet hits. At 750 yards, you could easily have 2 or more different wind speeds. How are you going to learn to read that in 100 rounds or less? You are just not getting how hard it is to hit something at those ranges without lots of practice. And not just hit something, but a living animal. Yes, you are trying to kill it. But you have a responsibility to do so humanely. I can hit an 18" gong out at 600 yards all day long with an old Swedish mauser. 9 times out of 10 I'll ring it. That doesn't mean that I would ever try to hit an animal out that far. Because I know I am only shooting 9 times out of 10, and that 10% failure rate is more than enough to make me say "Nope, no way." I know my limitations, and I never shoot at deer or hogs out past 300 yards. That is because that is the maximum range that I have found I can hit an 8" target consistantly. If I am going to spend all the time and money to go out on a hunt, I don't want to risk a shot that doesn't have a really high chance of dropping the animal. Yes, we all miss once in a while. And sometimes the critter moves at the last instant. But you want to do everything possible to make sure that the variables on your end are minimized. I really, really don't think that you can do that with a mere 100 rounds of practice.

-Mb

brentylax
07-28-2011, 9:36 AM
I'm not trying to hit a bullseye I have to land a round in a 20x20 killzone on the side of the animal and I am planning on bringing more than one bullet. I've killed antelope at about 475 before and I'm not thinking the difference is going to be massive. what would be a huge miss (15 inches or so off target) to a target shooter is a double lung shot that kills the elk in about 3 minutes. Perhaps your right and Im a fool for thinking that I can push my maximum range an extra 300 yds with good rifle and a day of professional instruction. Next year i'm signed up to do a couple weekend courses at Macmillian, which wont benifit me this year but should be benificial in the long run. Mokeyboy, what would you recomend i do to properly learn how to shoot at long distances? Is there a course, or a book, or an instructor that you would recomend?

Maddog5150
07-28-2011, 9:46 AM
A couple of weekend classes isnt going to magically give you the skill needed. They are just seeds and that is all. Nothing more, nothing less. Its up to you to make it grow those seeds into crops and to do so will be with thousands of rounds. With a 338 lapdog in match grade ammo, you are looking at up to five bucks a roun thats 5k in cash for practice. Another thing to note is that those little hollow points on match grade ammo do not expand much if it even does at all, it will be like shooting an elk with an FMJ.
It takes way more skill in my opinion to hike it, find, stalk, and get close to your kill than setting up a 105 and start slinging rounds at an elk.

gun toting monkeyboy
07-28-2011, 9:53 AM
Get out and start shooting. That is the best thing that you can do. Get involved with the long range crowd. They are scary in the sheer amount of information and expertise they have as a group. Some of them have been doing this for decades. Learn all you can about ballistics in general, and of your rifle in particular. And practice. See how your rifle shoots when you are aiming uphill or downhill. See how it reacts to crosswinds. If you are planning on hunting at that extreme range, make sure that you can consistantly hit things at that range. And not a 20"x20" target. You don't want to get a marginal hit. Even though the .338 LM hits like a truck, you want the animal to go down as fast as possible. Be the responsible hunter, and live up to being the guy who hunts out that far. Those are some really, really big shoes to fill.

Tacticalintervention
07-28-2011, 10:05 AM
Hey, been using a 338 for over a decade. Great caliber but you should learn to load for it if you plan to hunt.

For a hunting rifle under your conditions I would get the Remington 700 338 Lapua from Remington. Light accurate enough and cost under 1500.00

Scope I would get new SS 5-20x50 HD from SWFA. Cost around 1200.00 but equal to the 2000.00 scopes out there.

Brass only use Lapua brand in a 338 because rest is not near same toughness.

Bullets 300SMK and 300 Scenars are great on Elk. I have a friend who has taken one just about every year since 2000 witha 300 SMK from 338 Lapua

You can spend more and get a better rifle but for hunting under 1000 yards the stock Remington will do you right.

If you hand load you can tailor rifle to ammo and get better than the 1 moa you can expect with factory 338 ammo from the Remington. Bed Remington and tailor ammo and get about .75 moa

The Armalite is damm heavy for this use.
The Sako is great but cost is 2700.00 by the time you add break and scope base. It is a much better system and best deal for a 338 on planet.
The DTA will get you classed as eating alone and cost is way high for this purpose.

Hope this helps and if you get to loading feel free to contact me

mif_slim
07-28-2011, 10:25 AM
OP, after reading a lot of these replies.. I think you should get the rifle you want. If you get a DTA, I think it's even better. Reason why is so it'll show others that guns are not made just to kill people. When I started using AR as hunting rifles, people scoffed at me. But now, their(some of them) starting to understand that all rifles are the same, doesnt matter by shape, size, purpose. It can be used to hunt just as well as any other traditional hunting rifles. Its what the user uses it for.

skkeeter
07-28-2011, 10:49 AM
OP, after reading a lot of these replies.. I think you should get the rifle you want. If you get a DTA, I think it's even better. Reason why is so it'll show others that guns are not made just to kill people. When I started using AR as hunting rifles, people scoffed at me. But now, their(some of them) starting to understand that all rifles are the same, doesnt matter by shape, size, purpose. It can be used to hunt just as well as any other traditional hunting rifles. Its what the user uses it for.

This^^^^ Who cares what other people think. You sound like you have hunted before so don't listen to "everybody" through a computer screen. You seem to care about hunting ethics and and value information given to you. Get whatever rifle you want, and then practice a bit with it. Then hell, take it hunting and just use good judgement. People on here make it seem like you need years and years of experience to be able to even shoot the thing. Like the .338LM is some mythical round that can only be understood after a life of dedication. I have 2 .338LM and am a novice long range shooter. Simple fact about this round is it shoots flatter and more accurate than anything else I've ever shot. So in essence, your choosing one of the best cartridges out there for long range precision. Get what you want, and have some fun.