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DevilDog1988
06-23-2011, 1:22 PM
Went skeet shooting today for the first time. Had a blast and did pretty good considering it was also my first time shooting real ammo with a shotgun (Non lethal ammo doesnt count in my opinion). I had the most problems with leading the disc. Any tips for next time?

bjl333
06-23-2011, 2:30 PM
You are aiming the shotgun! Don't aim!! The eye has to be on the disc at ALL times and keep the gun moving. Don't shoot it like a rifle.

There are three clinics on this forum and visiting anyone of them will greatly enhance your enjoyment in skeet.

Curley Red
06-23-2011, 2:40 PM
Once you feel comfortable try going to a sporting clay range, those are a blast.

And like the other guy posted, don't aim, it sounds weird but in time you'll get it. Kind of like baseball, keep your eye on the ball or in this case the clay disc.

coyotebait
06-23-2011, 3:16 PM
Once you feel comfortable try going to a sporting clay range, those are a blast.

And like the other guy posted, don't aim, it sounds weird but in time you'll get it. Kind of like baseball, keep your eye on the ball or in this case the clay disc.

This, it's more "instinctive" I think...if that makes sense.
Sporting clays is by far the most fun you can have with your pants on (with a shotgun anyway)

POWG
06-23-2011, 4:26 PM
If you are in NOR-CAL - See Northern California "Wing-Shooting Clinic" info from my post below.

If not ...encourage you to read it anyway and then read it again. You will note there to be no mention whatsoever about the "L" word ..."leads". The reason being they are nothing more than sight pictures and right now, in my opinion that is the last thing you should be concerned with.

The reality is that if you have 100% target focus

Move the gun exactly like the target is moving

Have an efficient gun mount

Insert the gun into the picture ...without looking at the gun [see above concerning target focus]

You will magically project the shot string in a place & time where it will intersect the target ...or the target will intersect it. The target will break.

I or any number of other instructors could write a book on this stuff and it won't help. You must experience the magic yourself.

Seek out professional instruction you will get out of this game precisely what you choose to put in to it.

Good luck!

Here is the clinic info.

"Return To Basics Shotgun Clinics" by
TARGET SOLUTIONS


Location: BIRDS LANDING SPORTING CLAYS & HUNTING PRESERVE'S outstanding Five Stand practice & training facility

Dates & Times: June 12 FULL, July 10 & August 13. All sessions begin promptly @ 8:30AM 11:00AM & 1:30PM

No matter what you shoot you will shoot it better through understanding the art of hitting moving targets with the shotgun. The skills to be learned to be learned in these clinics are transferable and will absolutely make learning/improving in all of the “games” much easier!


In these clinics you will experience & understand:

1. Visual control of the target - REALLY look at it!

2. Your move - Just like the target!

3. The "efficient" gun mount - As you move to the target!

4. Insertion & the "kill-shot" - Consistently!


I like your comment about "man & dog". Hope you will appreciate mine below.


POWG is out.

utvtactical
06-23-2011, 6:49 PM
When I first started skeet shooting, "Skeet Shooting with D. Lee Braun" was my bible. It is a simple book with great advice. I started in 1975.

If you are serious about skeet, find a good instructor. My motto is that with time and money you can learn to shoot skeet. But with a good instructor, you will spend less time.

Find a good 2 day clinic and prepare to spend lots of time at each station. the two things I try to tell new shooters is to force yourself to pull the trigger and always keep the gun moving.

Don't fall into the trap of chasing a bird down and pulling the trigger as it leaves the field. The game is played between stations three and five. That is where you want to make your shots. don't worry about misses, but make the shot in that "zone".

Leads are simple to learn as long as you are not shooting in challenging weather. Wind can play havoc with your brain and you need to learn to trust your lead. Always move the gun. It is better to shoot in front of the bird than behind it. Its hard to catch up and easy to slow down.

Always try to pivot from the hips. Bend your knees slightly and try to keep your upper body straight. Your head needs to remain on the stock and you need to look past your barrel at the bird and not at your front sight.

And always have fun and think of the next bird, not the last.

DevilDog1988
06-23-2011, 8:24 PM
Yea thats exactly what I was doing that yall said not to. I was closing my left eye and aiming with my right. Not looking past the barrel. Also about keep the gun moving, I would try and ''cut off'' the disc and try to make it run into my shot. Any recomendations on a good shotgun that I could use for skeet shooting and home defense?
Yea I like that POWG. Reminds me of the phrase "Amateurs practice until they get it right, Experts practice until they get it wrong" Heard it from Chris Costa on Magpul Dynamics.

BLC
06-23-2011, 8:35 PM
Yep, keep both those eyes open. Prepare to spend some dough, it is very addicting.

Going out for sporting clays for the first time in 6 months, cant wait!

Thefeeder
06-23-2011, 10:06 PM
Dont sweat the rookie mistakes, we all started at the beginning.


"Any recommendations on a good shotgun that I could use for skeet shooting and home defense? "


Here is sone useful info

http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=425953

utvtactical
06-24-2011, 6:06 AM
Buy a 12 or 20 gauge semi auto and get a 26-30 inch barrel with adjustable chokes and a shorter barrel for use in the house.

Pumps are not good skeet guns, fun to shoot, but not if you want to be a good skeet shooter.

Thefeeder
06-24-2011, 9:08 AM
Pumps make a poor sheet gun

I hear this all the time and I'm calling it FUD

Many a Skeet Tournaments were won with pumps.

Why is a pump a great HD shotgun and a poor clay gun?


If you lack the skill to shoot twice at clays .......what the heck will you do if you need a follow up shot in a HD scenario under a lot more preasure.

bjl333
06-24-2011, 3:53 PM
Pumps make a poor sheet gun

I hear this all the time and I'm calling it FUD

Many a Skeet Tournaments were won with pumps.

Why is a pump a great HD shotgun and a poor clay gun?


If you lack the skill to shoot twice at clays .......what the heck will you do if you need a follow up shot in a HD scenario under a lot more preasure.

+4986634646548631654861651198641

I love shooting skeet with a pump! It developes the familarity needed with pumping a shotgun under pressure!

Justintoxicated
06-24-2011, 7:23 PM
Pumps make a poor sheet gun

I hear this all the time and I'm calling it FUD

Many a Skeet Tournaments were won with pumps.

Why is a pump a great HD shotgun and a poor clay gun?


If you lack the skill to shoot twice at clays .......what the heck will you do if you need a follow up shot in a HD scenario under a lot more preasure.


You don't, you just fire the next round with your semi auto? ;)

cmogi10
06-24-2011, 8:59 PM
I think it is because the shooters are so good and the margin of error is so small. It'll be a real feat getting that follow up shot with a pump faster then an o/u.

cmogi10
06-24-2011, 9:03 PM
Why is a pump a great HD shotgun and a poor clay gun?
\.

and I mean, apples and oranges ya know?

Thefeeder
06-24-2011, 10:18 PM
I'm not following your apples and oranges

cmogi10
06-25-2011, 7:14 AM
I mean everything you want for Home defense in a gun is very different then you'd want in a clay breakin gun. A heavy gun with long barrel(s), different chokes, minute ammo capacity, with the purpose of breaking one, or a pair of flying clay pigeons.

Short barrel and clinical reliability, along with ammo capacity seem to be the most important features for a home defense shotgun. That eliminates your double barrel shotguns, and everyone fears an auto loader will jam in the heat of the moment. That seems to be the biggest reason the pump gets the nod.


It is like saying it's FUD that my 2 inch snub nosed revolver is not as good as my 6 inch revolver for hunting because it's a good carry weapon.

ysr_racer
06-25-2011, 8:53 AM
Here's everything you need to know about shooting skeet.

The lead at station 1 is 1 foot, station 2 is 2 feet, stations 3, 4 & 5 is 3 feet, 6 is back to 2 feet, 7 is back to 1 foot, and 8 & 8 is the front edge AND KEEP THE GUN MOVING..

BLC
06-25-2011, 1:26 PM
Cant see a pump working out to well for sporting clays.

DevilDog1988
06-25-2011, 6:57 PM
sorry for the rookie question but im very new to shot guns but what exactly is a choke?

Shoot-it
06-25-2011, 7:07 PM
sorry for the rookie question but im very new to shot guns but what exactly is a choke?

It's hard for me to explain but i will try it contolls your bb shot patterns at different ranges.

Thefeeder
06-25-2011, 7:11 PM
Here is a choke chart

http://www.hunter-ed.com/images/graphics/ammo_pattern_spread.gif

POWG
06-25-2011, 9:59 PM
As to the topic of skeet leads ...some questions to ponder as POWG is not quite in agreement.

On which target at these particular stations ...high house or low house?

What if the shooter happens to be a swing through shooter ...some are for various reasons ??

Measuring these leads off the gun ...or the target?

Just what does a "foot ...two ...or three" look like? Does it change with distance to the target?

What happens if the shooter does not posses the skill set to establish a lead?

Unfortunately, most shooters are right hand (wrong mind) ...just joking! Anyone out there understand for example that a lefty will see Low 4 with a very similar lead perceived by a righty on High 4?

Way too much is made of leads ...way too soon in the learning process. In the proper scenario with teachable targets, student & technique the student will get results - i.e., "hit" targets and download those sight pictures into that wonderful computer the brain. Those pictures are that particular students "leads" at that particular time and with those particular skills.

POWG rarely speaks of "leads" for various reasons, the primary one being that the person "calling the shot" and giving their well intentioned opinion of "where" and then how much "lead" is needed - is all too frequently wrong!

When working with one of the best instructor/coaches on the planet back in `94-95 ...he admonished me to always keep this reality foremost in mind when coaching. "The best of the best instructors in the world are only correct in "calling the shot" 80% of the time. Anyone out there care to opine as to what they do the for the other 20%?

Well ?

POWG is out.

ysr_racer
06-25-2011, 10:41 PM
Based on the fixed distance to the target, the fixed speed of a skeet target, and 1200fps loads, the lead at station 1 is 1 foot, station 2 is 2 feet, stations 3, 4 & 5 is 3 feet, 6 is back to 2 feet, 7 is back to 1 foot, and 8 & 8 is the front edge AND KEEP THE GUN MOVING..

Math don't lie.

bjl333
06-25-2011, 11:47 PM
Math don't lie.

Yeap, math don't lie!! But trying getting the proper lead is where everything can go wrong! As in getting to the math the wrong way. Which is gonna form some bad habits. I'm gonna guess breaking bad habits is harder to do then learn right habits. $0.02...

JohnFLand
06-26-2011, 4:43 PM
Cant see a pump working out to well for sporting clays.

Actually, it's quite fun, just a bit more challenging. And by the end of one round, you'd be surprised how automatic and smooth it becomes.

cmogi10
06-26-2011, 4:56 PM
I love shooting skeet with a pump, it's the best practice for hunting season.

That being said when you are trying to find the absolute best tool for the job the other options bring advantage.

If a pump is all you got don't let that stop you.

Turo
06-26-2011, 5:11 PM
The only reason I don't use a pump all the time for skeet and sporting clays is because I don't have access to a 12ga pump. If I did, it would be all I used. When I graduated to a 12ga, my dad only had double barrels and semi-auto shotguns, so that's what I used. But, I still don't feel under-manned with my 20ga Winchester 1300 pump with a 21" barrel for skeet. In fact I feel that it's a little more challenging than the semi-autos. Those things make it way too easy. :p

cmogi10
06-26-2011, 7:52 PM
The biggest advantage to a double besides the fast follow up shot is the ability to use two different chokes, giving you the best pattern for close as well as far away birds.

steelholder
06-26-2011, 7:58 PM
practice, stay ahead of the clay and the further it gets the lower you aim. you'll get a system going

Thefeeder
06-26-2011, 10:13 PM
To all new shotgunners....go shoot some calys....hang out with some old f*rts at the range....get some personal lessons......come to one of the Clinics...learn the great skill of wing shooting

utvtactical
06-27-2011, 7:26 AM
Concerning using pump action shotguns for skeet. Having been a competitve shooters all through the 1990's in California, and even went to the World Skeet Shoot in San Antonio for my honeymoon. No one uses a pump shotgun in competition skeet. Pumps ARE fun and challanging, but serious skeet shooters prefer O/U 12 gauge shotguns with tube sets for shooting 20, 28 & .410 events with the same site picture.

Over and unders are the rule fr a majority of shooters, with semi autos making up the rest. Some top shooters use a semi auto for doubles. Most, myself included, use the 20 gauge for their 12 and 20 gauge events. You don't need a 12 gauge for the short distances of skeet, as most shots are made between the #3 and # 5 stations.

While the game of skeet was invented to help bird hunters to hone their skills, a lot of competitve skeet shooters don't hunt.