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View Full Version : Rabbit Hunting Tips


Rugerman
12-17-2006, 1:46 PM
Yeah, im going to Boron, CA near Edwards Airforce Base and need tips on getting some rabbits.

VeryCoolCat
12-17-2006, 2:43 PM
Don't forget to be "vewwy vewwy qwuiet" when your hunting wabbits!

I don't think theres anything you need to know... except don't the eat meat of one with a spotted stomach... means it has parasites.

You need shotshell cartridges to be legal. .22 shotshell cartridges are ok.

Hell if you walk around you eventually see one and they either stay there for a splint second going "Wha?" or take off runnin.

M. Sage
12-17-2006, 3:43 PM
You need shotshell cartridges to be legal. .22 shotshell cartridges are ok.

Dude, effective range on those .22 shotshells is what, 5 feet? Even then, I wouldn't bet on one taking down a rabbit.

Aren't rimfires legal to hunt bunnies with in the PRK?

VeryCoolCat
12-17-2006, 4:07 PM
Dude, effective range on those .22 shotshells is what, 5 feet? Even then, I wouldn't bet on one taking down a rabbit.

Aren't rimfires legal to hunt bunnies with in the PRK?

They are legal to hunt bunnies with... but they must be shotshell... you have to use a buckshot load.

Don't ask me why...

oh and jackrabits are all year round whereas cotton tail are seasonal.

moulton
12-17-2006, 4:21 PM
do they make .22 slugs?:rolleyes:

Spiggy
12-17-2006, 4:22 PM
IIRC; in Orange County, you can do it with box traps during the appropriate seasons and hours.

anotherone
12-17-2006, 4:38 PM
I believe you can also use air rifles, crossbows, and bows to hunt rabbits but don't quote me on that.

I personally just use shot number 8 with a 12 guage to hunt rabbits during the early fall. However, because the air is likely to be a bit heavier in the winter I'd use shot number 6 or 7. Remember to keep your shotgun swinging and aim a bit in front of the head if they take off running. Rabbits are FAST! In my opinion it's harder to shoot rabbits when they take off then it is to kill ducks and doves in the air.

xYourLocalAR15x
12-17-2006, 6:10 PM
i've got with my OLL and a benelli 12 gauge.



go with a 12 gauge. All i did was walk around and when they ran off i just pointed and pulled the trigger. BOOM tumble, tumble, tumble.

jmlivingston
12-17-2006, 8:22 PM
You need shotshell cartridges to be legal. .22 shotshell cartridges are ok.


Are you sure? I think rifle and pistol are OK except if you're in L.A. county.... At least, that's how I read part "f" below.

CA Fish & Game Regulations (http://www.fgc.ca.gov/2006/mammalregs06.html#307)

311. Methods Authorized for Taking Resident Small Game.

Only the following may be used to take resident small game:

(a) Shotguns 10 gauge or smaller using shot shells only and incapable of holding more than three shells in the magazine and chamber combined. If a plug is used to reduce the capacity of a magazine to fulfill the requirements of this section, the plug must be of one piece construction incapable of removal without disassembling the gun;

(b) Shotgun shells may not be used or possessed that contain shot size larger than No. BB, except that shot size larger than No. 2 may not be used or possessed when taking wild turkey. All shot shall be loose in the shell.

(c) Muzzle-loading shotguns;

(d) Falconry;

(e) Bow and arrow (see Section 354 for archery equipment regulations);

(f) Air rifles firing pellets and powered by compressed air or gas (0.20 caliber minimum for taking wild turkey); and firearm rifles and pistols for taking rabbits and squirrels, except in Los Angeles County, in addition to the methods listed in (a), (b), (c), (d) and (e) above;

(g) In San Diego and Orange counties only, rabbits may be taken at any time during the open season by means of box traps. Such traps shall not exceed 24 inches in any dimension, shall be tended at least once every 24 hours, and shall show the name and address of the trap owner. All rabbits taken under this section shall be immediately killed and become a part of the daily bag limit;

(h) Electronic or mechanically-operated calling or sound-reproducing devices are prohibited when attempting to take resident game birds;

(i) Coursing dogs may be used to take rabbits;

(j) Archers hunting during any archery season may not possess a firearm while in the field engaged in archery hunting during an archery season;

(k) The use of live decoys is prohibited when attempting to take resident game birds;

(l) Pistols and revolvers may be used to take blue and ruffed grouse in those counties only and for the season described in Section 300(a)(1)(E).

(m) Crossbows, except for provisions of Section 354(d) and (g).

(n) Dogs may be used to take and retrieve resident small game.




Am I mis-interpreting this? I've been wanting a .22lr or a .17hmr just for this purpose, to hunt cottontails.

John

M. Sage
12-17-2006, 8:37 PM
Looks like you're right to me. I haven't really read up on hunting regs here yet, but I have trouble imagining that .22 wouldn't be kosher for squirrels and rabbits and such.

Getting them to sit still long enough to hit 'em with the .22... now that's a different story. My preferred bunny gun in MI was a shotgun.

Hunter
12-17-2006, 8:39 PM
I believe those initial post here are tongue in cheek posts:p If not, some people really need to understand the hunting regs before posting:eek: .

Bottomline is that one can hunt rabbits with ANY firearm. The only restrictions one might find is on general firearm restrictions for a particular area or local. But that would apply to all hunting, not just rabbits.

So who wants to go after jackrabbits at 500 yrds with a 50 bmg? :D

jmlivingston
12-17-2006, 8:50 PM
Well, I hope it's tongue-n-cheek... Uusually there's some sort of smiley and VeryCoolCat is correct for L.A. county which is where he is; at least in regards to shotshell's being required for firearms. It's just not a statewide rule yet comes across that way.

When I was a teenager and hunted rabbits after school, I used both a .22 and a 12-gauge with a dove & quail load. That 12-gauge with the fine shot was the way to go! I was always amazed how tough it was to hit a rabbit with that Marlin-Glenfield model 25. Darn, I want to go rabbit hunting again!

John

M. Sage
12-17-2006, 9:33 PM
So who wants to go after jackrabbits at 500 yrds with a 50 bmg? :D

Hahahaha. "Did I hit him? Did I hit him?" How would you be able to tell? :P

anotherone
12-18-2006, 12:30 AM
When I was a teenager and hunted rabbits after school, I used both a .22 and a 12-gauge with a dove & quail load. That 12-gauge with the fine shot was the way to go! I was always amazed how tough it was to hit a rabbit with that Marlin-Glenfield model 25. Darn, I want to go rabbit hunting again!

I've found that even with an M-1 carbine semi-auto rifle they're still hard to hit if they start running. Shotgun will stop them no problem, especially when they pop their head up out of the grass to see what's up. What's up doc? 12 gauge that's what :D!

moulton
12-18-2006, 5:23 AM
I have gone hunting twice for rabits and one time Me and me cousin were walking back to the truck because we hadnt seen a thing and a rabiit busts out running he shots it in the head with a 12 guage and it keeps running so I shoot it 2 times and it roled end over end dying

MonsterMan
12-18-2006, 9:09 AM
I grew up in Arizona and all I ever used was a .22. I had a green Remington Nylon 66 that was a tack driver and I have a SS Ruger 10/22. I have never had trouble hitting one. Jack rabbits you could easily hit 50 to hundred yards out. When you hit them in the head they jump about 4 feet in the air. Cotton tails are a little harder to hit that far out. Just because they are harder to spot. Usually you see them 10 to 15 yards away from you, right before they bolt.

A method we used a lot when hunting rabbits was that we would walk down a draw just talking and not even acting like we were hunting. Then we would stop suddenly and look around. If we couldn't see one, and if there was one around, when we started to walk again they would usually take off running. They think that they have been spotted and bolt when you start to move again. You just have to lead them when you shoot at them running.

It seems that if you prowl along through a draw, then they know you are 'hunting' them. But if you just walk and talk, they aren't as likely to run. I hunted rabbits A LOT when I was young.

My dad would give me one bullet and say "if you come back with a rabbit, you can eat dinner". I always came back with one. It taught me to make my shot count. I never missed dinner. I always wondered if he meant it, but I didn't chance it. He was a survivalist kind of guy.

MM