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Baga
06-03-2011, 10:54 AM
:confused: I'm still trying to learn the differences between shotgun ammo. What are each one made for? Buck shot, bird shot, slugs, what else is there?
What do you use for shotgun ammo? Whats for target shooting at the range? Whats for hunting? 12Gauge, size? :confused:
If there is another thread with all the answers, please direct me. I tried to search for it but didn't give me good results. Thanks.

r870noob
06-03-2011, 11:46 AM
The literal name is pretty much what each type of ammo is for, buck shot is for buck, birdshot is for birds, etc. I'm still learning myself too lol.
Depending on the range you go to, some ranges allow buck and slugs, others just allow birdshot, so it all depends.

FYI, depending on your living space, some people keep buckshot as home defense ammo, others use birdshot, and some also use slugs even. There's a lot of different types of ammo for different situations, it just depends on your needs. If anyone cares to chime in, please do so because id like to keep an open ear on this.

call-in
06-03-2011, 12:57 PM
Birdshot = birds
Buckshot = bucks
Slugs = slugs :eek:

:D
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_hk_cayNIONo/RtBByrQLcHI/AAAAAAAAFJA/9O3mo1N_AWc/s400/SLUGS.JPG

bjl333
06-03-2011, 2:34 PM
:confused: I'm still trying to learn the differences between shotgun ammo. What are each one made for? Buck shot, bird shot, slugs, what else is there?
What do you use for shotgun ammo? Whats for target shooting at the range? Whats for hunting? 12Gauge, size? :confused:
If there is another thread with all the answers, please direct me. I tried to search for it but didn't give me good results. Thanks.

Buck is for selfdefense. They shoot around a bunch of BB sized pellet (Depending on the size of the shot ofcoz)

Bird shot is for birds or clays.

Slugs are for hunting animals where the state don't allow the use of a rifle.

Shot sizes varies:
Birdshot the higher the number the smaller the shot.
Buckshots the more "O" the bigger the BB.

carnelianbay
06-03-2011, 3:01 PM
9's for skeet
8's or 7's for trap
4’s to 7’s for birds depending on size & distance (and how may pellets you want to fish out of the carcass)
00 or 1 buckshot for self defense
Slugs to make a big hole with a lot of energy. They can take down a deer at 100 yds.

Baga
06-03-2011, 3:46 PM
What does it mean by 2-3/4" or 3" shell length? Can all shotguns shoot all the shell length. Or is there a certain length for certain shotguns? Example what shell length can a Remington 870 shoot, 2-3/4" or 3" or both?

newglockster
06-03-2011, 4:05 PM
a shotgun can only shoot the length of shell that it is mark for. A shotgun should be marked on the receiver and/or barrel with what it accepts. it will say only 2-3/4, or 2-3/4 and 3", or 2-3/4, 3", and 3-1/2". Just gotta check the gun.

kmchui
06-03-2011, 4:22 PM
Some siiiick looking custom shells:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RP4FjODPDFA

sargenv
06-03-2011, 4:45 PM
As soon as I get back to a real computer, I'll do up a good description(unless someone beats me to it).

mjsweims
06-03-2011, 5:15 PM
a shotgun can only shoot the length of shell that it is mark for. A shotgun should be marked on the receiver and/or barrel with what it accepts. it will say only 2-3/4, or 2-3/4 and 3", or 2-3/4, 3", and 3-1/2". Just gotta check the gun.

Not quite right. Many shotgun barrels are marked for the maximum length shell they are chambered for.
So a barrel marked 2-3/4 will accept 2-3/4 or shorter shells (yes there are shorter, but not very common)
The shell length is measured after the shell is fired, not in the box, so a 3" shell will be less than 3" in the box.

There are different materials for bird shot. The common ones are lead and steel. Steel or non-toxic shot must be used for waterfowl, in lead free zones, and where required by DFG (eg pheasant in waterfowl areas). I don't know if steel is used in the larger sizes of shot 0 and larger. Other types of non toxic shot are ITX, bismuth, hevi-shot, hevi-shot classic doubles etc. Lead is used for large animal hunting, upland game etc.

Shot size varies according to the game being hunted:
4-8 upland game. 4-6 for wild pheasant, 7-1/2 - 8 for grouse, dove, quail, 6 - 7-1/2 for chukar, 4 - 7-1/2 for rabbit
bucksot - slugs for larger animals like deer.
7-1/2 - 8 for trap, and sporting clays
8 for skeet

newglockster
06-03-2011, 8:00 PM
Not quite right. Many shotgun barrels are marked for the maximum length shell they are chambered for.
So a barrel marked 2-3/4 will accept 2-3/4 or shorter shells (yes there are shorter, but not very common)
The shell length is measured after the shell is fired, not in the box, so a 3" shell will be less than 3" in the box.

yep that's right... I forgot that in my hurry... thanks! :)

Thefeeder
06-03-2011, 10:49 PM
Your in San Francisco....take advantage of one of my Skeet Clinics at Lake Merced.

I cover all of this stuff

Dough! forgot the link............http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=405000

sargenv
06-04-2011, 4:24 PM
The interesting thing is, most of this is covered in any really good shotshell reloading book. Lyman's is one of the better ones that covers everything save specialty stuff.

Wikipedia is your friend.. look it up..

Generally...

9 (.08") through 3 (.14") = Birdshot
2 (.15") through FF (.23 cal) = Course Shot
#4B (.24 cal) through 0000B (.38 cal) = Buck shot

The info below is for lead shot only.

For the .410, there are usually 2.5" or 3" hulls.. these are measured fully opened.. Nominal load is 1/2 oz for the shorter hull, 3/4 oz for the 3"

For the 28 gauge there is one length commonly available, 2 3/4". Standard load is 5/8 oz up to 1 oz.

For the 20 gauge, there are two lengths commonly available, 2 3/4" and 3". Loads can be had from a low of 5/8 oz up to 1 1/4 oz.

For the 16 gauge, the common length is 2 3/4" but there is one shell that is 2 1/2". Loads are available from 3/4oz to 1 1/8 oz.

For the 12 gauge, there are 3 length's commonly available, 2 3/4", 3", and 3 1/2". 3 1/2" loads are generally for waterfowl or turkey hunting. There are many loads available, birdshot up to buckshot, and single projectile slugs from 7/8 oz up to 1 1/4 oz. It is the most versatile of all gauges. Loads are possible from a very light 3/4 oz up to 2 1/4 oz in the 3.5" hull.

For the 10 gauge, this is usually thought of for hunting large geese or other large waterfowl, turkeys, and that's really about it.. the guns are large, heavy, and recoil is usually too much for most people. There was a shorter hull available in the past but for the most part the 3.5" hull is about it.. 2 7/8" was the shorter length. Standard lead loads of 2 to 2 1/4 oz of lead shot is standard. 1 9/16 oz of steel is the max payload but lighter faster loads can be just as effective. After looking at the Hodgdon web site, it appears there is a 2 3/4" hull available.. but I have not seen this hull. I am wondering if this might be a typo...

That is it in a nutshell. Personally, I use 12 gauge for about every type of wingshooting that I do from Doves to Ducks, pheasant, and geese.. I could deer hunt with it (using slugs) or use it for home defense (course or buckshot). There is a Coyote load using heavy shot and size F course shot. The 16 and 20 are pretty good lighter duty hunting guns with the smaller gauges reserved for expert hunting or clay target games. The 20 edges out the 16 a bit due to more ammo available commonly. I already mentioned what the 10 is good for. The 12 and 20 are most common, the 410, 28, 16, and 10 are less common and ammo will be harder to find. There is a 32 and 24 gauge, but these are even rarer in the US.

Thefeeder
06-04-2011, 5:11 PM
^^^^^^

Sticky!!!!!

RTE
06-04-2011, 5:23 PM
9's
8's or 7's
4ís to 7ís
00 or 1 buckshot
Slugs
And still no mention of saltrock

MossbergMan
06-04-2011, 5:31 PM
OMG, what about the bean bag and baton rounds??? Breeching rounds. Tazer rounds.
LOL Rocksalt....:eek: haven't thought about that nasty stuff for years...ouchie!
Didn't mention saboted slugs...I want a picture of those....lmao
Good info about SG ammo types and desriptions of use already posted...I just had to throw a curve in.

003
06-04-2011, 6:38 PM
http://www.shotgunworld.com/ammo_s042002.html

LazyDog
06-04-2011, 10:14 PM
2 3/4" 00 Federal Low Recoil for home defense and occasional target shooting at metal targets.

gobi fish
06-05-2011, 6:17 AM
oh boy, put down the gun and slowly step backwards away from it. what ever you do, try not to put a 20 gauge in to a 12 gauge shotgun...

gobi fish
06-05-2011, 6:19 AM
Birdshot = birds
Buckshot = bucks
Slugs = slugs :eek:

:D
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_hk_cayNIONo/RtBByrQLcHI/AAAAAAAAFJA/9O3mo1N_AWc/s400/SLUGS.JPG

+1.

great advice although id add humans with the slugs.

CmpsdNoMore
06-05-2011, 8:04 AM
I don't know if someone mentioned it yet, but I personally wouldn't use buckshot on deer unless I was very close or was unable to use a slug.

carnelianbay
06-05-2011, 4:18 PM
OMG, what about the bean bag and baton rounds??? Breeching rounds. Tazer rounds.
LOL Rocksalt....:eek: haven't thought about that nasty stuff for years...ouchie!
Didn't mention saboted slugs...I want a picture of those....lmao
Good info about SG ammo types and desriptions of use already posted...I just had to throw a curve in.

You forgot these :43: See attached

chaseface
06-05-2011, 5:44 PM
9's
8's or 7's
4ís to 7ís
00 or 1 buckshot
Slugs
And still no mention of saltrock

Or flachette rounds, or dragon's breath!!

Marlin Hunter
06-06-2011, 3:49 PM
Slugs are for making very large holes in things. They are also good for blowing up 1 gallon water jugs, watermelons, and cantaloupes. The slugs have more range than buck or bird shot; usually they are good out to 150 yards.

(I think) Buckshot was originally intended for shooting deer in areas where the terrain is mostly level and you can't see very far. The idea is that the lead balls won't travel 2 miles and hit another person, or go through a house. Some States (or Counties within certain States) only allow hunting with buckshot. Buckshot also increases hit probability for people who can't hit what they are aiming at, especially if the target is moving (home defense). I never said I can hit what I am aiming at, so I also use buckshot.

POWG
06-06-2011, 4:34 PM
Saltrock!

Absolutely devastating for hunting those garden variety Slugs ...and also Snails on the lawn at daybreak. Stops them dead in their tracks!

Now it has been mentioned.

POWG has made a joke ... and is out.

dipsomaniac
06-07-2011, 11:03 AM
Here's vid on basics. http://www.guntalk.tv/gtv/library.php?category=3&video_id=undefined&cache=Tue%20Jun%2007%202011%2010%3A53%3A31%20GMT-0700%20%28Pacific%20Daylight%20Time%29

sargenv
06-11-2011, 12:00 PM
Flechette, rock salt, bean bag, etc are what I consider specialty loads. I was trying to give a good representation of what most ppl would use. I've loaded some specialty rounds like buck and ball, buck and slug, steel shot, tungsten shot, and a few other limited things. There is limited data for most of that and it is usually proprietary stuff. You need to be able to work within the limits of a very narrow pressure band. From about 6000 psi to around 11,500 psi on the higher end. I've even loaded birdshot and buck using buffer material and roll crimps. That is way too much info to include in a short post on a forum.