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Scarecrow Repair
12-12-2006, 8:24 PM
A friend has a 7.7mm Japanese type 99 and has started reloading for it because ready made was up to $56/20 at the local store. We found some 125 grain bullets at Midway for $10/100, but they have since been discontinued and the only available bullets now are $17/100. A big price jump! He has been thinking of casting his own bullets, he has plenty of lead and indeed casts other things like dive weights for his gold mining adventures. But in looking around past casting threads, I found one post which said that lead bullets (ie, no jacket) leave a lot of lead behind in the rifling, especially at speeds over 1000 fps.

Does this mean that casting lead bullets for rifles is a bad idea, it should really only be done for handguns? His Arisaka has a chrome lined barrel, does this make any difference?

M. Sage
12-12-2006, 10:08 PM
Hasn't the price of stuff like this gone up with materials? Metals are getting more expensive...

$13/100 seems like your best bet on Midway. http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=408254

ivanimal
12-12-2006, 10:26 PM
I used to shoot low end loads in my 30-06 using cast bullets. The leading problems associated with it made me stop. I got tired of cleaning so much burnt on lead, not to mention the posibility of muzzle wear.

762cavalier
12-12-2006, 11:59 PM
scarecrow Leading is caused by driving a too soft bullet too slow. the faster you drive a bullet the harder the alloy needs to be. After about 1600 fps a gas check style bullet is usually required. Casting his own bullets he can mix the alloy to his desired hardness and tune the loads. Try this site for Cast boolit questions-http://castboolits.gunloads.com/

Scarecrow Repair
12-13-2006, 7:30 AM
I went ahead and ordered those bullets; they are 180 grain round nose and the old ones were 125 grain spritzers, but these will hold him over for now.

The casting site looks to have a lot to ponder :-)

tankerman
12-14-2006, 1:31 PM
Hardcast and or gas checks help prevent leading. I shoot A LOT of cast bullets and do not have problems.

ivanimal
12-14-2006, 2:20 PM
FYI:

I was not looking to save money as much as I was looking for a varmint load for 30-06

I also shoot plated bullets with no ill effects I buy the ones made by Berry's Mfg. I use them in 45ACP and 9MM. I was using gas checkes bullets and still had a leading issue.

Fjold
12-14-2006, 2:43 PM
FYI:

I was not looking to save money as much as I was looking for a varmint load for 30-06

I also shoot plated bullets with no ill effects I buy the ones made by Berry's Mfg. I use them in 45ACP and 9MM. I was using gas checkes bullets and still had a leading issue.


If you are looking for a varmint load for a 30.06 try the 100-120 grain jacketed and or half jacketed bullets. It will be a lot easier than shooting cast bullets of any weight.

OldLandParkPat
12-17-2006, 2:03 AM
Ditto on what 762 said, but you can achieve near jacketed performance with cast bullets.

It's a learning curve. I've got about 8 years in it and now that's all I shoot with all my firearms.

Basics:

1. You need to clean your bore down to bare metal. Copper fowling causes leading every time.

2. You need to slug your bore to get it's groove diameter. Your cast needs to be sized at least .002 over for most every shooter, and the best lube for your velocity needs to be used with a gascheck if over bout 1200 fps.

3. Your alloy needs to be hard enough for your load pressure and velocity for smokeless powder cartridges. Straight wheel weights are a excellent mix, and water dropping gets you even a harder boolit.

4. You need the lowest pressure powder load for your ctrg to give you the best results with no leading.

Once you achieve the cast holy grail, you never even have to clean your shinny lead free bore... :)

For hunting there's no better way to go. Quick bangflop kills with larger calibers, and you can eat right up to the hole like our ancestors did... ;)