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View Full Version : New AR-15, loading and ejecting rounds, can they accidentally go off?


Daaave
05-30-2011, 10:23 AM
Hey guys this is my first post to calguns.net. I just got a brand spanking new AR-15, the Stag Arms lefty model 8 (piston operated) a couple days ago. As a new gun owner I wanted to take it apart and become familiar with its operation.

Anyways to get to the point, I chambered a round and then ejected it and noticed that the primer had been dimpled. This was on all 5 rounds that were in my magazine and I had done that to. Is this dangerous to do? I'd rather not take any risk while sitting in my living room in suburbia.

Thanks guys.

Dave

pontiacpratt
05-30-2011, 10:30 AM
Nope (but practice the safe handling always)... the firing pin is free-floating and taps the primer when it chambers a round. I've read that repeated chambering and ejecting a round can destroy the primer.

Daaave
05-30-2011, 10:40 AM
Thanks for the quick response! I always do my best to practice safe handling and ensure that others around me do as well. I am glad to hear it won't go off, I'm OK with ruining a couple of cheep wolf rounds.

dieselpower
05-30-2011, 10:41 AM
Slam fires DO occur. All it takes is a light primer to cook off. I have seen it happen.

You should chamber a round in the same way you pull a trigger... with the rifle pointed in a safe direction.

RugerNo1
05-30-2011, 10:43 AM
Please, be careful!

Anything can happen. The firing pin can somehow get binded up a little more forward and create just the right circumstances for a slamfire.

Murphy's Law always prevails when you do not expect it to.

pontiacpratt
05-30-2011, 10:44 AM
Get some snap caps or dummy rounds and you can function check all day long with no risk.
http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o158/figgie1/jasonstuff/0122012304a.jpg

Daaave
05-30-2011, 11:01 AM
Awesome. Thanks for the info, I will be some ordering some dummy rounds along with some other gizmos.

goodlookin1
05-30-2011, 11:17 AM
Get some snap caps or dummy rounds and you can function check all day long with no risk.
http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o158/figgie1/jasonstuff/0122012304a.jpg

THIS x 1000

I hate chambering a round if I dont intend to carry (locked and cocked 1911) or unless I am at the range/shooting on purpose. Sometimes when reloading, you want to make sure a round will be able to chamber properly.....that the case was resized properly. I dont like sticking real rounds in the chamber if I dont have to, so I'll make up a dummy round by just seating a bullet in a resized but empty case with no primer. That way, I have a template if I ever need to measure out the case again with that specific bullet.

One accident and my CCW gets taken away, and MUCH MUCH WORSE, somebody could get injured. Just dont risk it unless you're at a range or somewhere you can shoot, with the muzzle pointed where the bullet is safe to go.

r6raff
05-30-2011, 11:32 AM
I have heard of slamfires but never seen it happen in person. The risk is there for sure, always handle your weapons with safety. But the dimple in the primer is normal, and that primer requires a bit of strike to fire. Accidents do happen and weapons do fail... when weapons fail, its our safe handling and practice that will save us, its the difference between an "Oh **** that was close" and a "Oh **** **** **** im screwed... or dead"

ohh yea, and snapcaps are great for legit function and magazine checks without risking an accident.

TKM
05-30-2011, 11:39 AM
As always, keep the weapon pointed in a safe direction.

Military primers are harder than just regular old primers.

A bad combination of a soft primer and a little dirt in the firing pin channel would suck.

bartt
05-30-2011, 11:44 AM
I've read this twice now and have to post..
My Ar never marks the primer unless I pull the trigger. I would detail strip my gun if I were you and make sure that the bolt is not dry or gunked up. This sounds dangerous to me.
As others have said make sure it is pointed in a safe direction!

r6raff
05-30-2011, 11:49 AM
I've read this twice now and have to post..
My Ar never marks the primer unless I pull the trigger. I would detail strip my gun if I were you and make sure that the bolt is not dry or gunked up. This sounds dangerous to me.
As others have said make sure it is pointed in a safe direction!

Interesting, most ARs I have use and know of dimple the primer when chambered. I know it does also depend on the primer, some are harder or softer than other

bartt
05-30-2011, 12:06 PM
Yeah, I reload most of my ammo, using CCI primers which I know are harder than the average bear.. Perhaps that is it. Still dimpled primers make me really nervous.
Next time out I'll make note of the primers on various ammo after chambering just to be sure.

tomd1584
05-30-2011, 12:11 PM
Please don't load & eject live rounds while sitting in your living room! like others have said, slam fires occur. I'd hate to be one of your neighbors if one goes off.

SJgunguy24
05-30-2011, 12:41 PM
Pull the firing pin first, then your GTG with live ammo. That being said, you should invest in some dummy rounds to avoid pulling the pin. Also when using action proving/dummy rounds, remove all live ammo from the room, s**t happens, just hopefully not to you.

1911su16b870
05-30-2011, 12:41 PM
You could remove the FP in your BCG, but then you have the risk of a high primer...which could also cause a kaboom.

Never muzzle anything you don't want to destroy!

bwiese
05-30-2011, 1:09 PM
AR15/M16-design weapons do have a light primier strike by design. (If yours doesn't, it's out of spec!)

These guns are designed to use quality milspec ammo with proper QC: no high primers, and the primers are 'hard' military primers.

Your results using Uncle Joe's 223 handloads or gunshow handloads may vary: old bolt gun guys don't seem that sensitive to high primers [long story on that one!], and hunting rifle primers are often far, far 'softer' than mil grade primers.

Now, add in some variability from a bottom-feeder parts build with a firing pin that's a tad long out of spec, or a firing pin that is a bit bound up from retracting by gunk/debris, or a firing pin that has some debris right at its tip - and you can have loud, disturbing 'issues' at best, with someone hurt or killed at worst.

This is why the Four Rules of Gun Safety ALWAYS must be followed - even when CHAMBERING.

[It's also why I do not chamber rounds in my AR(s) at home. If I need it I can rack it almost instantly, and there's a handgun or two ready for "party crashers" anyway.]

Remember that negligent discharges in your home may result in criminal charges that, while fightable, do carry risk of losing gunrights for some time.

pontiacpratt
05-30-2011, 1:12 PM
I don't recommend pulling the FP. I tried that and there is nothing to keep the cam pin from spinning the wrong way. The bolt got jammed closed and I had to put the pin back in to line everything back up.

PEBKAC
05-30-2011, 2:03 PM
I don't recommend pulling the FP. I tried that and there is nothing to keep the cam pin from spinning the wrong way. The bolt got jammed closed and I had to put the pin back in to line everything back up.
I was going to say. ;)

Seems that the only reasonable way to do the "no firing pin" method would be to take a spare firing pin and remove the bit that actually protrudes from the bolt face.

That or you could just get some dummy rounds. Personally I think dummy rounds are an easier solution as you aren't constantly taking apart and reassembling the gun.

killshot44
05-30-2011, 3:35 PM
Always clean the firing pin channel in the bolt, especially behind the boltface (q-tips/carbon cleaner) so the firing pin slides freely.
Makes for fewer light primer strikes and lessens the chance of a dirty/bound-up pin making hard contact with a primer when chambering a round and causing a slamfire.

/loves the Dr Drake/Magpul box....

Daaave
05-31-2011, 7:13 AM
Theres a lot of good info here. My dummy rounds will be arriving in a few days so my rifle will remain empty until then. Thanks guys.