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Altahick
12-10-2006, 3:07 PM
hey guys i want to start doing some reloading, i would like to know what a good starter kit is, and where is a good place to buy from. i was looking at a rcbs kit for about $250.oo from cabelas, it comes with just about everything i would need, except for dies etc... would this kit be what i would need to get started, for now i just want to reload my .243, i can always upgrade my reloading supplies later on, but for now i want something for a good price that will just get me started. any info is appreciated thanks calgunners.

Blue
12-10-2006, 4:13 PM
Probably a good kit to start out with. Hit up Midway and see if they have the same kit. Might be cheaper. I just picked up a set of Lee 308 and 223 dies from Midway for $10 each and change.

Scarecrow Repair
12-10-2006, 4:47 PM
Get as many opinions and teachers as possible. Everyone has their own blind spots and things they have forgotten were mysterious to them when they learned. Things they neglect completely as being obvious are not obvious to others.

To be a bit more specific, I suggest getting several different reloading books. There will be two differences: basics and tables. Some books only have specific powders and bullets listed, by house brand or author's favorites. You can get a much better idea of all the ins and outs from different sources. If you can look over books in the book/gun store, look at several different examples in each book, and try to get those which have different powders and data in general.

762cavalier
12-10-2006, 5:08 PM
First place to start would be to read the Lyman reloading manual and/or the Lee manual. Lots of great info on the reloading process and load data too. You can spend as much or as little as you want to reload. I am currently using the Lee classic cast press and it is a great press and very stout. Lee dies work well also. You will get opinions on different manufacturers and who is better but it is like a Ford vs Chevy vs Dodge kind of argument. I have both lee dies and rcbs dies and they all work the same as far as I can tell.
I'll second the suggestion to check out Midway. They are frequently cheaper than Cabelas. If you have a C&R license they also offer a great discount

Since you are located next to me in Roseville PM me and maybe I can lend you one of my manuals and help you get started. I have been doing it for a couple of years now and am no expert but I can make ammo that goes bang every time;) I'm located down here in south Sacramento.

LCAZES
12-10-2006, 8:48 PM
How much do you shoot? If you shoot 200+ rounds a month I would suggest that you start with a progressive setup right away because you will quickly outgrow the single stage press. I started with an RCBS rockchucker and within 6 months I replaced it with a dillon 550B. My rockchucker hasnt been used since. If you have ANY mechanical ability at all, you will come up to speed on the progressive very quickly.

Sheldon
12-10-2006, 9:23 PM
Sent you a private message about some used reloading equipment in your area.

Altahick
12-11-2006, 5:14 PM
thanks for the help guys, i probably dont shoot 200+ rounds a month, so i think that the single stage press would be good for me, im still looking at the rcbs stuff, its afordable, and i hear lots of good stuff about it.

theres one for sale on craigslist for $180.oo with the press, scale, powder throw, reloading manual, deburring tool, a LEE primer press, shell holder, three sets of dies (10mm, 38/357, 22-250) etc.

i guess that seems like a good price?

eckerph
12-11-2006, 5:37 PM
Have you checked to see if Sportsman's warehouse has any kits? you may save on some shipping charges if they do. you also may want to give Hornady a try, I love their bushing system for dies, makes changing dies a snap.

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=749997

Altahick
12-11-2006, 6:03 PM
Have you checked to see if Sportsman's warehouse has any kits? you may save on some shipping charges if they do. you also may want to give Hornady a try, I love their bushing system for dies, makes changing dies a snap.

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=749997

i havent looked at sportsmans warehouse reloading stuff yet, but i have to be back ther on monday to pick up my gun i paid for on fri ( grrrr 7 more days :( ) so i am defienetly going to check out the stuff there.

thmpr
12-11-2006, 6:10 PM
Dillon reloader units....Check it out first before you make a decision. If your thinking of getting into the .224 caliber, than you want a progressive unit.

Rule .308
12-11-2006, 6:10 PM
I was raised on RCBS stuff so that is always going to be my preference. You can never go wrong having a Rock Chucker bolted to the bench regardless of how many super dooper progressive presses you have. I have a Dillon 550 and a Square Deal B and the Rock Chucker still sees service when it comes to just proccessing brass and for hand loading varmint rounds where you do not make a ton of them and you want every single one to be as close to perfect as you can get. It seems that every manufacturer out there has at least one or two nifty little widgets that you cannot do without. The Lee Auto Prime II is one of those things, sounds like that kit you are looking at might have one. I don't care for Lee dies but their Collet Sizing dies make the straightest brass I have seen. The rest of their dies are kinda of chincey in that the use aluminum in their construction. RCBS, Redding, Forester, and Hornady all make good dies. I particularily like the Hornadies for pistol stuff. As the other guys have stated you need to find someone in your area that can give you some hands on experience. Also, check out the accurate reloading forums, do a search for them and you will find 'em. Some of the guys that frequent that board have forgotten more about reloading than your average Joe will ever know. Good luck and don't blow yourself up.

Mark

50ae
12-11-2006, 6:20 PM
That kit would be an excellent start and it is something you'll always want to keep around bolted to the bench even when you upgrade to a progressive unit. Get a couple manuals and read the "How to" and "safety" sections twice each and then get an experienced reloader to help you out. After you get done doing it the slow way for a while and decide to upgrade then come back and ask some more questions about upgrading as you'll be better informed as to what you may be interested in at that point. I have a Dillon 650 and love it but I'm thinking of adding a turret press to my bench as their is a few things I would like to do slower and the Dillon is like using a full auto rifle for reloading. You just can't really sit down and load 10 rounds. In fact, I won't do anything less than 1000 at a time with it as it just isn't worth it to do so few.

I will say this, reloading, for me, is nearly as fun as the shooting itself.

Just my humble opinion, your mileage may vary

Altahick
12-11-2006, 6:22 PM
I was raised on RCBS stuff so that is always going to be my preference. You can never go wrong having a Rock Chucker bolted to the bench regardless of how many super dooper progressive presses you have. I have a Dillon 550 and a Square Deal B and the Rock Chucker still sees service when it comes to just proccessing brass and for hand loading varmint rounds where you do not make a ton of them and you want every single one to be as close to perfect as you can get. It seems that every manufacturer out there has at least one or two nifty little widgets that you cannot do without. The Lee Auto Prime II is one of those things, sounds like that kit you are looking at might have one. I don't care for Lee dies but their Collet Sizing dies make the straightest brass I have seen. The rest of their dies are kinda of chincey in that the use aluminum in their construction. RCBS, Redding, Forester, and Hornady all make good dies. I particularily like the Hornadies for pistol stuff. As the other guys have stated you need to find someone in your area that can give you some hands on experience. Also, check out the accurate reloading forums, do a search for them and you will find 'em. Some of the guys that frequent that board have forgotten more about reloading than your average Joe will ever know. Good luck and don't blow yourself up.

Mark

yeah my uncle, used to relaod a few years ago, he's no pro but he has reloaded alot of rounds so he can at least show me the basics, and how to not blow myself up :D thanks for the tip on checking out a reloading forum, i am going to check out some right now. thanks

OldLandParkPat
12-17-2006, 1:28 AM
I have a lot of gear from different manufacturers, and they all have good and not so good.

On Lee dies and their factory crimp dies, they produce my the most accurate ammo.

One real good and important item IMO for a beginner is the LEE "Safety powder scale", and the reason I say this is because it's extremely accurate, and you CANNOT bump it out of a setting, causing an over charge. A bump will throw it out a real obvious 10 grs minimum, and if you can't notice that, probably should not reload your own.

What ever press you use, you have to measure your powder charge at least periodicly.

It locks your powder setting into place so you can't make a mistake.

I've got redding, RCBS, and a few other beam scales, and they all can be bumped off the setting and you don't know it. THAT is real dangerous.

I pretty much alway use the LEE scale, and it is as accurate as the most expensive one I own.

Wulf
12-17-2006, 7:37 AM
There's a sportsman wharehouse in Rocklin now out of 65 and blue oaks. They've got a full selection of presses on display there....really the best reloading store in the area. I'd go check things out there first. The sales people dont seem ALL that knowledgable but you can at least handle the presses.