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cian
05-27-2011, 10:02 AM
Ok here is a question for you guys.

I am sitting at home when I hear sirens and then hear screeching brakes, and then gunshots. I look out the window and I see a wounded police officer on the ground, and see 2 or 3 people shooting at the officer while he is down.

Ok here is the question, should I get my gun and try to help the officer? Or should I just call the police and wait?

I am not trying to come off as a "Rambo" type, I was just curious.

Oh and I am a Marine if that helps. 1993-1997

Cian

Ron-Solo
05-27-2011, 11:28 AM
Just keep in mind that responding units won't know you are a good guy, so expect to be treated as a possible suspect until they figure it out.

Me, I'm jumping it with both feet and anything in my arsenal that fits the situation. I'll be making myself known when the first units arrive, without a gun in my hand.

cian
05-27-2011, 11:40 AM
As for the resoponding units, I know I would still be treated like a suspect, but I would have my wife on the phone with 911 giving them my description and a situation update.

Quickdraw Mcgraw
05-27-2011, 11:54 AM
interesting...if you save his life they probly treat ya like a HERO, on the other hand if he dies??????

BoJackUSMC
05-27-2011, 12:08 PM
Since you are former Marine, you should have no problem hitting body shape targets with your motivated AR 15 up to 500 yards. So just take cover without exposing yourself and take them out one by one. After that notify yourself without weapon on your body to the responding unit when they arrive.

Mr. Burns
05-27-2011, 12:22 PM
I would help. If I didn't I could never look at myself in the mirror again.

Bunyfofu69
05-27-2011, 12:24 PM
In a situation like that, responding units will be so focused on the task at hand, they may not even hear subsequent information (except for the important facts i.e. shots fired, description of person, direction of flight, location). Your description may not even be relayed, or misinterpreted as a 2nd subject.

The prudent thing to do, is remain safe and covered. If the threat has left the area, immediatly give medical attention (what you may know), or relay vital information over the net to dispatch via the radio.

I can recall an incident with an off duty NYPD fellow who interveined on a assualt of a women.
He drew on the assailants and was ultimately shot and killed by responding units with mistaken identification.

IF you have an m60 at the ready though. By all means.

Falconis
05-27-2011, 1:47 PM
If it's me, by all means help me out!!!!! Granted I may not be able to give a statement while I am bleeding my guts out, but I'll thank you after I regain conciousness. Bottom line, every action has to be decided by the individual knowing full well consequences may come out of it, good or bad. Me if I were in non sworn shoes, I would help the good guys. It's how I was raised.

1911su16b870
05-27-2011, 2:01 PM
I am helping out with whatever I have on me.

When units roll up I am grounding anything, arms up, stepping away and going kneeling and face down prone, until it is sorted out.

Ron-Solo
05-27-2011, 3:38 PM
interesting...if you save his life they probly treat ya like a HERO, on the other hand if he dies??????

We (LE) would still be grateful for the effort!

yzernie
05-27-2011, 4:59 PM
No question in my mind, I'm here to help the good guys. Ultimately, a decision only you can make. If you are at your home there should be available cover and concealment for you to use as you are eliminating the threat(s).

stix213
05-27-2011, 5:56 PM
I would try to help. Its just the right thing to do. I'd call 911 afterward, since I would expect they already know since there is already an officer there.

My hands would be in the air as soon as any additional officers arrived, before they even tell me to.

I'm not a LEO, so don't listen to me. Just saying what I would do.

Desert Dude
05-28-2011, 9:54 AM
Ok here is a question for you guys.

I look out the window and I see a wounded police officer on the ground, and see 2 or 3 people shooting at the officer while he is down.

Cian

If you can see them they are in range. Take cover, return fire on the targets you see, render first aid to the officer and wait for arriving units.

This is what I would try to do.

Notorious
05-28-2011, 11:34 AM
Fire away and put down the threat, then put the gun away as fast as you hear the approaching sirens, get far away from the gun, and then prone yourself out while yelling you're the one who called it in and we can verify with dispatch when we get everyone situated. Just make sure the officer hears you once and stop talking so they don't get more confused with the chaos going on and get emotions worked up more than they already need to be.

Thanks for your service!

cian
05-31-2011, 8:04 AM
Thanks for your replies, it was just a thought me and my co-worker were talking about.

And you can be sure I would get involved.

Roddd
05-31-2011, 6:06 PM
Thanks for being willing to get involved. Many people would just stand and watch. I've seen it...not in a shooting situation but one where an officer is losing a fight.

Tacit Blue
05-31-2011, 6:55 PM
Thanks for being willing to get involved. Many people would just stand and watch. I've seen it...not in a shooting situation but one where an officer is losing a fight.

Don't forget to fire from the hip and take his radio and call a 11-99 with the location and who you are.:)

solanoshooter
05-31-2011, 9:50 PM
911, advise what you are wearing for responding officers, then jump into the mix.

IrishJoe3
05-31-2011, 9:59 PM
interesting...if you save his life they probly treat ya like a HERO, on the other hand if he dies??????

What the op is describing is exactly what Gary Kness did on April 6th, 1970. On that date Mr. Kness, working as a trucker, stumbled across the Newhall Massacre.




Gary Kness, 31, a former U.S. Marine, was en route to work when he happened upon the shootout. Kness got out of his vehicle and ran over to the fallen officer Alleyn. He tried to drag Alleyn to safety, but was unable to move him. He looked up and saw Davis discard his now-empty sawed-off shotgun and grab the Remington shotgun that had been dropped by Officer Frago.....
Back on the other side of the cruiser, Kness picked up Alleyn's discarded shotgun and tried to shoot at Davis, but the gun was empty. As Davis opened fire on him with Frago's revolver, Kness dropped the shotgun and returned fire with Alleyn's service revolver. His shots struck the Pontiac, and a fragment of one bullet lodged into Davis' chest. However, the shot did not incapacitate Davis, and Kness was soon out of ammunition.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_Kness



Even though Mr. Kness was unable to save any of the four CHP officers, he's regarded as a hero, even today.




Now 69, Kness was hugged by Alleyn's relatives. A long line of CHP officers and other law enforcement authorities formed to shake his hand. "I've always heard of you. I've wanted to meet you all my life," said retired San Fernando Police Officer Fred Iversen.
http://articles.latimes.com/2008/apr/05/local/me-chp5

IrishJoe3
05-31-2011, 10:03 PM
Thanks for being willing to get involved. Many people would just stand and watch.

a big +1. I have been solo in a couple really tense situations and have had members of the public ask me if I needed help. Tell you what, nothing restores my faith in the public as a civilian willing to put themselves in harms way to help me.

Roddd
05-31-2011, 10:34 PM
99% of civilians are honest, hard working people. It's easy to become jaded in this line of work.

Bobby Ricigliano
06-05-2011, 4:15 AM
If I was pinned down like that I'd welcome any help I could get. I always take a quick look when I roll by a T-stop off duty to make sure dude is OK.

r3dn3ck
06-05-2011, 6:57 AM
I'll take any help I can get when I need it. I think cops would tend to agree. Dying sucks.

Help the cop and don't feel bad if you get shot in the process. Even if it's the cop that shoots you.

For my money, despite a healthy disrespect for the newest minting of officers (post 9/11 recruits) and a healthier disrespect for much of the laws put on the books before and after 9/11, I look to see that the officer appears to be in control every time I pass a scene. If I can't see the cop, I'll stop nearby till I can (this got me pulled over and extensively questioned and then politely thanked just one time) see him. If it looks bad it probably is bad. There's always a firearm handy but I'm usually concerned that my help would be more needed with stopping bleeding and starting an 11-99 call if it ever were to become an issue.

tyrist
06-05-2011, 10:13 AM
The call is yours; but remember you, your house, and your family will probably be the subject of incoming fire as well. If it was me I would want any help I could get.