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marxdspot
12-09-2006, 5:25 PM
Hi All.

I'm tired of plinking around and also I just got a rifle in 308 (M1A), so ammo's not cheap. Hence, I wanna start making my shots count on paper. So I wanna start considering long range scoped shooting. I've heard and read of snipers and other long range shooters hitting at over 800 yards with a 308 rifle. And how about "1 shot 1 kill". They can look down range and hit a target accurately with one shot.

Right now, I'm your basic shooter. I can shoot down down range and adjust my scope for zeroing, but at a cost of maybe a dozen rounds. WEAK!!!:p

I know there's plenty of books out there...I really wanna start educating myself from ballistics to wind adjustments. I just don't know where to start. I don't have too many shooter friends and the one's that are shooters are people I infected with the BRD (black rifle disease). So, they don't know much. So far, the only knowledgeable shooter friends I really have are my fellow calgun members;)

I know this all sounds lame, but I gotta start somewhere.

I know alot of accurate shooting requires time and practice, but I wanna make sure that I practice the right/proper techniques. Can someone please lead me to the right direction? Any reliable reads on the net? Any books or vids you'd recommend? I've already done a search through the net and calguns. I've even tried joining the army during my teenage years, but due to a physical condition , I was declined:(

Help please...thanks in advance!:)

VeryCoolCat
12-09-2006, 5:26 PM
Hi All.

I'm tired of plinking around and also I just got a rifle in 308 (M1A), so ammo's not cheap. Hence, I wanna start making my shots count on paper. So I wanna start considering long range scoped shooting. I've heard and read of snipers and other long range shooters hitting at over 800 yards with a 308 rifle. And how about "1 shot 1 kill". They can look down range and hit a target accurately with one shot.

Right now, I'm your basic shooter. I can shoot down down range and adjust my scope for zeroing, but at a cost of maybe a dozen rounds. WEAK!!!:p

I know there's plenty of books out there...I really wanna start educating myself from ballistics to wind adjustments. I just don't know where to start. I don't have too many shooter friends and the one's that are shooters are people I infected with the BRD (black rifle disease). So, they don't know much. So far, the only shooter friends I really have are my fellow calgun members;)

I know this all sounds lame, but I gotta start somewhere.

I know alot of accurate shooting requires time and practice, but I wanna make sure that I practice the right/proper techniques. Can someone please lead me to the right direction? Any reliable reads on the net? Any books or vids you'd recommend? I've already done a search through the net and calguns. I've even tried joining the army during my teenage years, but due to a physical condition , I was declined:(

Help please...thanks in advance!:)

Buy reloading supplies... 308 is very expensive if you didn't do so. You can also by South African 308 surplus. Thats DECENTLY affordable... just don't expect great accuracy.

marxdspot
12-09-2006, 5:29 PM
Buy reloading supplies... 308 is very expensive if you didn't do so. You can also by South African 308 surplus. Thats DECENTLY affordable... just don't expect great accuracy.
I've been told the same thing about the ammo problem and I do plan on getting myself up to reload. How about edumakation?

CalNRA
12-09-2006, 5:30 PM
one thing you coulds start with is go out with your M1A, whether at a public range or otherwise, and shoot the rifle at different distances with different loads and record the ballistic path of the rifle in regards to different rounds(assuming you are using commercial rounds and not reloading). Then you can either get a nice scope with a multi-zeros or click your current scope through its range and record the differences. The same can be done with the windage adjustment and patterns should emerge with a goood rifle.

Seriously, there is no magic in long distance shooting for me other than a note book that contains all the data that goes with my 70 in 308. I have data going back quite a few years since I was a kid and I have to start all over with a new barrel. Sigh

I wish I could reload but time is not my friend these days.

JPglee1
12-09-2006, 5:32 PM
Send a PM to "Big Jon" he's really into both reloading and long distance target shooting. He can help you get dialed in.


Im more of the close range bump fire waste ammo and practice wanna-be keyboard kommando CQB skills kinda guy.


J

cornholio1
12-09-2006, 5:32 PM
Hi All.

I'm tired of plinking around and also I just got a rifle in 308 (M1A), so ammo's not cheap. Hence, I wanna start making my shots count on paper. So I wanna start considering long range scoped shooting. I've heard and read of snipers and other long range shooters hitting at over 800 yards with a 308 rifle. And how about "1 shot 1 kill". They can look down range and hit a target accurately with one shot.

Right now, I'm your basic shooter. I can shoot down down range and adjust my scope for zeroing, but at a cost of maybe a dozen rounds. WEAK!!!:p

I know there's plenty of books out there...I really wanna start educating myself from ballistics to wind adjustments. I just don't know where to start. I don't have too many shooter friends and the one's that are shooters are people I infected with the BRD (black rifle disease). So, they don't know much. So far, the only knowledgeable shooter friends I really have are my fellow calgun members;)

I know this all sounds lame, but I gotta start somewhere.

I know alot of accurate shooting requires time and practice, but I wanna make sure that I practice the right/proper techniques. Can someone please lead me to the right direction? Any reliable reads on the net? Any books or vids you'd recommend? I've already done a search through the net and calguns. I've even tried joining the army during my teenage years, but due to a physical condition , I was declined:(

Help please...thanks in advance!:)


Keep trying the military....they need people bad.

M. Sage
12-09-2006, 5:46 PM
Hi All.

I'm tired of plinking around and also I just got a rifle in 308 (M1A), so ammo's not cheap.

Buy a .22 to compliment your M1A.

And/or:
Go shoot in competitions.

marxdspot
12-09-2006, 5:50 PM
Buy a .22 to compliment your M1A.

And/or:
Go shoot in competitions.
Don't you have to be trained or taught before going into competitions?

marxdspot
12-09-2006, 5:50 PM
Keep trying the military....they need people bad.
I did...twice! REJECTED!:confused:

marxdspot
12-09-2006, 5:51 PM
Send a PM to "Big Jon" he's really into both reloading and long distance target shooting. He can help you get dialed in.


Im more of the close range bump fire waste ammo and practice wanna-be keyboard kommando CQB skills kinda guy.


J
Okay...thanks!:)

Blacktail 8541
12-09-2006, 6:12 PM
CalNRA]one thing you coulds start with is go out with your M1A, whether at a public range or otherwise, and shoot the rifle at different distances with different loads and record the ballistic path of the rifle in regards to different rounds(assuming you are using commercial rounds and not reloading). Then you can either get a nice scope with a multi-zeros or click your current scope through its range and record the differences. The same can be done with the windage adjustment and patterns should emerge with a goood rifle.

Seriously, there is no magic in long distance shooting for me other than a note book that contains all the data that goes with my 70 in 308. I have data going back quite a few years since I was a kid and I have to start all over with a new barrel. Sigh




Mapping your scope adjustments, practicing trigger pull by dry fireing and getting a natural point of aim, are some of the more essential points to becomeing effetive at long distance marksmanship.

Once you find a brand off ammo that is accurate in your rifle stick with it. Don't switch back and forth between ammo just because you got a good deal on it. The .308 has some of the most accuate factory ammo available.

Trigger control- knowing your triggers letoff and pull are essential, in long distance marksmanship being supprised when your trigger breaks is not the goal. Knowing when your firearm is going to fire allows you to call your shots, and allows you to destinguish between good shots and bad before you ever see the target as well as other info.

By getting in the habbit of developeing a natural point of aim your groups will shrink dramatically. Natural point of aim is established by adjusting your body position so that your site come to rest in the center of the target and not haveing to use mussels to artificially adjust your point of aim. You know you have natural point of aim if you can close your eyes when in position and open them and your sites are still lined up on the bull or very close to it.


These are some of the basics you will need to learn to become proficient at long distance. You may be able to ignore some of this at short distances and get away with it , but at longer range it will tattle on you very quickly in group size and consistancy.

There is a lot more to be covered, but litature to cover this is available better than I can explain in a forum.

Hope this helps.

TMC
12-09-2006, 6:23 PM
Don't you have to be trained or taught before going into competitions?

Not really. The only "teaching" you'll need for compeition is for safety. Most bullseye type/stand and shoot matches its "show up and shoot". You need a safety/into. course before action/tactial/3-gun matches.

You're one your own when it comes to knowing how to hit the targets.

Wulf
12-09-2006, 6:50 PM
If you've got a shotgun and a pistol you can take that rifle out and shoot 3-gun with it.

Also on the accuracy/reloading front, I've been making passable match quality ammo by taking South African surplus, pulling the bullets, uniforming the powder charges and seating a match quality bullet. Match bullets are about a quarter a piece, so if you add that cost to the cost of the surplus (25 to 30 cents a round) you're shooting good accurate ammo for less than most commercial loads and much less than match quality rounds.

marxdspot
12-09-2006, 6:52 PM
Mapping your scope adjustments, practicing trigger pull by dry fireing and getting a natural point of aim, are some of the more essential points to becomeing effetive at long distance marksmanship.

Once you find a brand off ammo that is accurate in your rifle stick with it. Don't switch back and forth between ammo just because you got a good deal on it. The .308 has some of the most accuate factory ammo available.

Trigger control- knowing your triggers letoff and pull are essential, in long distance marksmanship being supprised when your trigger breaks is not the goal. Knowing when your firearm is going to fire allows you to call your shots, and allows you to destinguish between good shots and bad before you ever see the target as well as other info.

By getting in the habbit of developeing a natural point of aim your groups will shrink dramatically. Natural point of aim is established by adjusting your body position so that your site come to rest in the center of the target and not haveing to use mussels to artificially adjust your point of aim. You know you have natural point of aim if you can close your eyes when in position and open them and your sites are still lined up on the bull or very close to it.


These are some of the basics you will need to learn to become proficient at long distance. You may be able to ignore some of this at short distances and get away with it , but at longer range it will tattle on you very quickly in group size and consistancy.

There is a lot more to be covered, but litature to cover this is available better than I can explain in a forum.

Hope this helps.
Now that's what I'm talking about. I've just copied and pasted what you said. I'm taking this to the range and start practicing it. Thank you very much!

Fjold
12-09-2006, 7:34 PM
That's 732 yards. :D
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v214/Fjold/AntelopeHunt025.jpg

marxdspot
12-09-2006, 8:19 PM
That's 732 yards. :D
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v214/Fjold/AntelopeHunt025.jpg
WOW! Nice shot!

adamsreeftank
12-09-2006, 11:53 PM
I recommend you concentrate on the fundamentals. Trigger control, sight alignment, breathing. Try to be aware of everything as you fire the gun. You want to be relaxed and steady. If you don't work on the fundamentals, your potential for shooting accurately will be severely limited.

marxdspot
12-09-2006, 11:58 PM
I recommend you concentrate on the fundamentals. Trigger control, sight alignment, breathing. Try to be aware of everything as you fire the gun. You want to be relaxed and steady. If you don't work on the fundamentals, your potential for shooting accurately will be severely limited.
Thanks friend! I'll remember to keep the fundamentals in mind.

Matt-man
12-10-2006, 12:45 AM
Go shoot some NRA High Power Rifle matches. It's an excellent way to develop marksmanship skills. A lot of places run orientations for new shooters, so don't worry about not having any training.

wildcard
12-10-2006, 1:35 AM
If you want an academic reference I HIGHLY recommend John L. Plaster's "The Ultimate Sniper: An Advanced Training Nabual for Military and Police Snipers." I say academic because you can't learn to "snipe" without perfect practice supplemented by the proper knowledge and methodology..

The book isn't cheap but it's worth it.

J

swift
12-10-2006, 7:24 AM
I recommend you concentrate on the fundamentals. Trigger control, sight alignment, breathing. Try to be aware of everything as you fire the gun. You want to be relaxed and steady. If you don't work on the fundamentals, your potential for shooting accurately will be severely limited.

I'd recommend getting a .22 to practice the fundamentals. Ammo is cheap and it's a heck of a lot of fun. Also, check out www.benchrest.com

marxdspot
12-10-2006, 8:31 AM
If you want an academic reference I HIGHLY recommend John L. Plaster's "The Ultimate Sniper: An Advanced Training Nabual for Military and Police Snipers." I say academic because you can't learn to "snipe" without perfect practice supplemented by the proper knowledge and methodology..

The book isn't cheap but it's worth it.

J
I came accross this book on Amazon.com before posting this thread and it had high reviews. Just hesitated because there other books out there. Now I know. Thanks!

marxdspot
12-10-2006, 8:32 AM
I'd recommend getting a .22 to practice the fundamentals. Ammo is cheap and it's a heck of a lot of fun. Also, check out www.benchrest.com
Thanks...just put on my favorites!:D

bu-bye
12-10-2006, 1:43 PM
If you want an academic reference I HIGHLY recommend John L. Plaster's "The Ultimate Sniper: An Advanced Training Nabual for Military and Police Snipers." I say academic because you can't learn to "snipe" without perfect practice supplemented by the proper knowledge and methodology..

The book isn't cheap but it's worth it.

J

BIG +1!

I have read all his books and they are great. He not only talks about shooting but also human psychology, human anatomy and other tactics. Mostly pointless stuff for us non-military type but still is very interesting. Who knows, if the "S" ever does "HTF" you will have a lot of tid-bits of info that might save your life. He offers great advice in shooting and even goes over gear such as guns, optics, ammo and clothing. I have his books at least twice and every time I can't put it down.

M. Sage
12-10-2006, 1:47 PM
Don't you have to be trained or taught before going into competitions?

Depends on the competition type, but usually it's just a safety orientation type of thing. Not too tough, and they usually do it right before the compmetitions. Just do some local "for fun" stuff...

Like Chabot Tactical rifle. :D