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View Full Version : Proper use of Boresnake


tundraman
12-08-2006, 6:09 PM
What is the proper way to use the Boresnake? How are you guy's using yours? I guess I was hesitant to use mine for the first time. I am to used to using the old methods. Any help, advise, tips and suggestions are appreciated.

Fjold
12-08-2006, 7:28 PM
Unwrap it from the package and straighten it out.
Check the condition of the outer covering and wire brush inside it.
Does it feel reasonably even with no kinks?
Lift it carefully with your right thumb and forefinger
Drop it carefully in the nearest trash receptacle

markymark
12-08-2006, 7:30 PM
Unwrap it from the package and straighten it out.
Check the condition of the outer covering and wire brush inside it.
Does it feel reasonably even with no kinks?
Lift it carefully with your right thumb and forefinger
Drop it carefully in the nearest trash receptacle
LMFAO :)

tundraman
12-08-2006, 7:33 PM
Unwrap it from the package and straighten it out.
Check the condition of the outer covering and wire brush inside it.
Does it feel reasonably even with no kinks?
Lift it carefully with your right thumb and forefinger
Drop it carefully in the nearest trash receptacle
So obviously you dont like the Boresnake. What about it do you dislike so much? Apparently more people like it than not. I have not used one yet so if there are drawbacks please inform me.

PLINK
12-08-2006, 7:57 PM
I use them mainly in my .223's or .22's because of the bore size. Anyway what I do is put CLP before the brush and after the brush (tail area). Pull it through a few times. If I won't be shooting the rifle anytime soon I will use my one piece rod so I can get a good amount of oil in the barrel for storage.

Kruzr
12-08-2006, 8:01 PM
I use them on all my pistols and .22 rifles right after I shoot. I don't like them as a cleaner with solvent.......that's what patches and jags are for. It will remove any residue that remains in the barrel and makes real cleaning a little easier.

On my 1911's I run it up the magwell, across the ramp and through the barrel. Always pull it through from breech to muzzle.

When they get dirty, I put them in a jar of hot water and detergent and shake it up. Then hang to dry.

Fjold
12-08-2006, 8:10 PM
I use a solid one piece stainless steel rod and a bore guide to clean rifle barrels. My biggest concern with bore snakes is that grit and contaminants can get imbedded in the loose mesh and scratch the chamber, bore or crown of the barrel.

I want the best performance out of my rifles as possible, why wouldn't I pay $50 one time for a quality cleaning rod and a bore guide and not risk my barrel's accuracy.

icormba
12-08-2006, 8:35 PM
I use a solid one piece stainless steel rod and a bore guide to clean rifle barrels. My biggest concern with bore snakes is that grit and contaminants can get imbedded in the loose mesh and scratch the chamber, bore or crown of the barrel.

I want the best performance out of my rifles as possible, why wouldn't I pay $50 one time for a quality cleaning rod and a bore guide and not risk my barrel's accuracy.

I worried about this too, then I began to think... where the heck would grit and contaminants come from? and how the heck would they get imbedded in the loose mesh? I then thought, is that the crap from the bullet traveling through the barrel? hmmm... copper & lead is softer than my heavy duty steel barrels. I don't shoot steal core or steal jacketed ammo and I do clean the snake after each cleaning session so I don't worry about it too much.

They are great when I'm in a hurry, but when I'm taking my time... I still use the good 'ol Dewey Rod.

I worried about this too, then I began to think... where the heck would grit and contaminants come from? and how the heck would they get imbedded in the loose mesh? I then thought, is that the crap from the bullet traveling through the barrel? hmmm... copper & lead is softer than my heavy duty steel barrels. I don't shoot steal core or steal jacketed ammo and I do clean the snake after each cleaning session so I don't worry about it too much.

They are great when I'm in a hurry, but when I'm taking my time... I still use the good 'ol Dewey Rod.

For Pistols, I just use those pistol brushes and patches.

Incitatus
12-08-2006, 11:11 PM
Best invention since sliced bread.
Moisten the portion before the brush with Hoppe's #9 solvent , run it 3 times from the action to the muzzle; after finishing, put a few drops of CLP lubricant on the end part of the bore snake, run it one more time through the barrel.
Now you have a clean rifle / pistol / shotgun.

The most dangerous thing about the bore snake is cleaning it: every so often put the bore snake in the dishwasher and run a washing cycle. Or put it in an old sock and drop it in the laundry washer. Be careful, if you are seen by wife doing this, the consequences to your health may be extreme.

Scarecrow Repair
12-08-2006, 11:57 PM
As I understand it, a bore snake is a long piece of material which collects crud and ends up trading old crud for new crud, so you have to toss it after a while and buy a new one. Some people think the proper number of uses before tossing is zero :-)

I found this patch worm from someone else here -- http://www.patchworm.com/ - a long thin nylon snake which pulls ordinary patches through. Since you aren't dragging the same material through each time, it is doesn't mess up the insides of the barrel.

But I am pretty new to this, so don't take my word for it.

just4fun63
12-09-2006, 5:26 AM
I think they have their place. Quick field cleaning, good to take on hunting trips, Quick swab of the barrel between stages in my IPSC matches. When I go home and have time then it's the old fashioned method for a good cleaning. I don't use any oil on mine I think that reduces the amount of crud they pick up, and I wash 'em now and then

swift
12-10-2006, 7:13 AM
I use a solid one piece stainless steel rod and a bore guide to clean rifle barrels. My biggest concern with bore snakes is that grit and contaminants can get imbedded in the loose mesh and scratch the chamber, bore or crown of the barrel.

I want the best performance out of my rifles as possible, why wouldn't I pay $50 one time for a quality cleaning rod and a bore guide and not risk my barrel's accuracy.

I use bore snakes on handguns and shotguns. I use a good one-piece rod with a guide on rifles. Does it matter? I don't know, but I see the 'old timers' only using bore snakes on plinker firearms and not on target rifles.
When in doubt, I mimic the guys who shoot better than I do.

Mike 56
12-16-2006, 11:02 AM
The one i use for my 22 i removed the brush i pull it though 3 times then i pull a patch puller i made out of weed whacker line with CLP on it and i am done. After 500 rounds (a brick) i tear down the whole rifle including the bolt clean every thing. I just use them on my other rifles at the range for a quick cleaning every ten shots or so. Mike

9mmdude
12-22-2006, 11:59 PM
I put a couple of drops of breakfree on mine and use them to clean rifles and handguns. I think they are a great invention. After about 20 cleanings I toss them and buy a new one.

Mike 56
12-23-2006, 4:34 AM
Don't thow them away send them to me. I put mine in a laundry bag and wash them in the washing machine then air dry. Mike

Turbinator
12-25-2006, 12:14 AM
Be careful, if you are seen by wife doing this, the consequences to your health may be extreme.

Wife or no wife, there are still health consequences if you are really washing your boresnake in the dishwasher. Any leftover lead styphenate material from your spent primers embedded in the boresnake could find their way onto your dishes, and subsequently into your system. You'd probably be better off washing your boresnake separate from any objects or enclosures that will eventually make contact or somehow connect with your digestive tract.

Turby