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sierratangofoxtrotunion
12-01-2006, 1:53 AM
Where could somebody send a 80% build to have it anodized, say, around the first week of January?

M14Gunman
12-01-2006, 2:07 AM
You can anodize it yourself with little more than a battery charger...

They sell kits too... if all you ever do is one... it may not be worth it but if you plan on it in the future you could buy a kit...

Here is one such kit:
http://www.focuser.com/atm/anodize/anodize99.html

Mud
12-01-2006, 5:42 AM
Here is another supplier of Anodizing kits and also has a great Forum for the Beginner.

http://www.caswellplating.com/

cornholio1
12-01-2006, 5:55 AM
Where could somebody send a 80% build to have it anodized, say, around the first week of January?


Your gonna anodize an 80% or a 100% If I am not mistaken, only a licensed person can handle your receiver (>80%). Its kinda useless anodizing an 80%.

Sydwaiz
12-01-2006, 5:56 AM
Let your fingers do the walking! There are tons of places in L.A. that do it. Just check the yellowpages under platings or coatings and you should find a bunch.

bwiese
12-01-2006, 7:27 AM
Likely you can only do this work when it's 100% (i.e., done).

The anodizer must have an FFL unless you are continually present at the site and in vicinity with the receiver during the work.

elsolo
12-01-2006, 9:39 AM
Do you want decorative color anodizing or hard anodizing?
They are different processes, color anodizing is easy but hard anodizing is harder.
Techplate in Anaheim can do it.

SemiAutoSam
12-01-2006, 9:45 AM
IMHO you would want to complete the receiver first and then anodize as if its hard anodizing your planning to do.

Attempting to thread the buffer tube hole would be a lot harder after the surface is hard anodized.

sierratangofoxtrotunion
12-01-2006, 4:19 PM
Ok, yeah sorry for not being clear, I'm thinking anodize after it's 100%. I think that just makes the most sense. I hadn't realized there are different process for hard anodizing and for color. Is hard anodozing necessary? Or recommended? Or standard procedure? If I wanted it a color (black, or whatever) and hard, would I need both processes then? It sounds like yeah I should probably pull out a phone book.

SquidBeak
12-01-2006, 6:32 PM
You can anodize it yourself with little more than a battery charger...


Have any of you guys tried this? What kind of results have you had?

I would think that it would require a fair amount of trial and error to get things right.

I don't think it would be all that expensive to have it done by a real plating house.

SquidBeak
12-01-2006, 6:34 PM
The anodizer must have an FFL unless you are continually present at the site and in vicinity with the receiver during the work.

If that is the case, that will drastically limit your options...that blows :( .

SemiAutoSam
12-01-2006, 6:43 PM
I have a rather large power supply 0-50 Volts 0-50 Amps. Would have to research what else it would take. I have copper plaited in the past.

But not any anodizing.

sierratangofoxtrotunion
12-01-2006, 6:59 PM
I can handle practicing on bits of scrap, but.

Mud
12-01-2006, 7:20 PM
I would stay away from the battery Chargers, the Amperage fluctuates along with the current. The best way to go is with a continuous Power supply that kicks out 3-5 amps. I bought a Power supply at Frys (13v 5amps continuous) , it makes for a consistent anodizing process.

M14Gunman
12-02-2006, 2:38 PM
Have any of you guys tried this? What kind of results have you had?

I would think that it would require a fair amount of trial and error to get things right.

I don't think it would be all that expensive to have it done by a real plating house.


I have anodized a few things. I did my 80% lower I completed as a .50 cal lower... it was pretty simple. T56 aluminum is a decent alloy anyway. I anodized it just in case. Its pretty simple.. just takes some time to set up but once its done you can anodize anything.

sierratangofoxtrotunion
12-02-2006, 9:16 PM
Ok then one thing I need to clarify: retail AR lowers are black. What anodizing process(es) do those receivers... receive? Just color anodizing? Or are they hard-anodized? Does hard-anodizing come out black, and thats what they are? Or are they anodized black, and then hard-anodized after that? Or...? (Is my cluelessness in this matter evident?)

SemiAutoSam
12-02-2006, 9:23 PM
Somewhat but that's OK you have some patience with my quirks and I will have patience with yours.

here is a link that may help in your understanding of this process.

they usually anodize receivers in batches for one thing. I have the equipment and power supplies if you want one done would only need to purchase the chemicals.

http://techplate.com/specchart1rev.htm
http://www.techplate.com/firearms_pl.htm


Ok then one thing I need to clarify: retail AR lowers are black. What anodizing process(es) do those receivers... receive? Just color anodizing? Or are they hard-anodized? Does hard-anodizing come out black, and thats what they are? Or are they anodized black, and then hard-anodized after that? Or...? (Is my cluelessness in this matter evident?)

M14Gunman
12-03-2006, 3:58 AM
As I said it is pretty simple.... I do the hard anodizing.

I used a stainless steel dutch oven I purchased from Walmart.... it has to be a CHEEP ONE.. the cheeper the better because you don't want teflon or any other "coating". I removed all of the hardware and put it in my oven and did the "self clean" where it gets super hot for like 4 hours. That helped remove all of the "crap" from the manufacturing process.

I soldered a bare copper wire I got from a section of old Romex to a pistol grip bolt and then screwed the bolt firmly into the pistol grip hole.

I built a square wood frame around the dutch oven and then put wood over the top. It looked like an easter egg basket made from 2x4. I drilled a hole in the center of the 2x4 directly over the center of the dutch oven and pulled the bare copper wire through the hole so that the receiver was suspended within the dutch oven without actually touching the sides or bottom.

Fill the dutch oven with anodizing fluid so that the receiver is fully submerged. Take a good 12 volt power supply and solder the negative lead to the dutch oven and then solder the posative lead to the bare copper wire and let it stand.

The anodizing process creates little bubbles... you leave it in there until no more bubbles are forming and there is no more current draw on the PS. At that point it is hard anodized. Afterwards I sprayed it with Gunkote and it came out VERY nice.... looked factory....

On a painted receiver you wont be able to tell between anodized and not... the hard anodizing just makes the very surface of the aluminum a little bit harder to help curb wear. I would suggest it but its not even required.

cornholio1
12-03-2006, 6:12 AM
I'd go with gunmans idea if you were going to do batches of anodizing but if not, just have it done by a company and stand around while they do it. If your going to do just one, its not worth buying the solution and supplies and experimenting with it. You have to spend money on things you will probabaly not use again and find a place to store all of it. I'd go with the superior arms prices for shure.