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SarcoBlaster
05-10-2011, 12:09 PM
I'm currently about halfway though the level III academy at the OCSD academy and will be finishing at the end of June. They're not sure if they will have a level II class after ours, but word is it might not be until next year. If there's no level II academy this year, I'd like to at least get my foot in the door at one of the LASD stations as a level III reserve.

In any case, I know level III's aren't allowed to have duties that are likely to result in making arrests, so what exactly can they do? :confused:

I guess this question is geared toward those who work/have worked as a LASD deputy since I'm sure duties would differ from department to department.

Thanks in advance!

Bobby Ricigliano
05-10-2011, 1:21 PM
All of the reserves at the stations I have seen go 10-8 and make arrests. I'm sorry I don't know what a Level III is. We love our reserves though, especially on the weekends and when we are short.

Tacit Blue
05-10-2011, 1:51 PM
Correct me if i'm wrong but i think the following order goes like this:

"Level I Reserve Officers

This is the highest level of Reserve Peace Officers. These officers have the same law enforcement powers and authority as regular officers while on duty and may be utilized in such capacity depending on the policy of the host agency.

To be appointed to this level, Reserve Officers must have completed at least one of the following course regimens and completed the department prescribed field training requirements:

P.O.S.T. Basic Modular Course Level III, Level II and Level I, or
P.O.S.T. Basic Academy, or
P.O.S.T. Modules A, B, C and D, or
Appointed as a Level One Reserve Officer prior to January 1, 1997
Level I I Reserve Officers

Level Two Reserve Officers have peace officer powers and work in a general law enforcement capacity under direct supervision of a qualified regular full-time peace officer. After successful completion of a prescribed training schedule and field experience, the Level II reserve officer is eligible to be promoted to a Level I reserve officer, as long as that officer has successfully completed the POST prescribed training as outlined above.

Level I I I Reserve Officers

Level Three Reserve Officers are are deployed and authorized only to carry out limited duties not requiring general law enforcement powers in the routine performance of duties. This may include duties such as traffic control and crowd control."

source http://www.copquest.org/academy/

http://lasdreserve.com/index.php?showtopic=2466 Check this out, alot of useful info too. I guess you wear the LASD uniform and carry a firearm, during traffic control or riots. Also it mentions work as a custody assistant within the jails.

P.S i'm not LASD, nor LE Yet. Google is my friend :)

Tallship
05-10-2011, 3:36 PM
Most of our level III perform either specialized (Search and Rescue) or transport duties. The transport involves the reserve sitting at the station until the patrol dep brings in 10-16. After the station processing, the reserve then takes the prisoner down to central jail for booking, allowing the patrol dep to be back on his beat. The patrol deps love it.

Tacit Blue
05-10-2011, 4:13 PM
Do they drive the Astro Vans or a Marked/ unmarked unit? I think i've seen those level III's at Vista Detention Facility. When i drove past it, you can see the intake area from the street.

1911su16b870
05-10-2011, 6:40 PM
FWIW stay in OCSD's excellent reserve academy until you complete your L1! Get it all done and then never look back (except for your 24hr/2year perishable skills). :D

Tacit Blue
05-10-2011, 9:35 PM
Ok i'm used to the idea of a POST basic academy or a extended academy. But if you do the academy in a module format first being level Level III then II is it the same as being a academy graduate? In that the next phase would be hiring phase> then field training?

And is the structure still Para Military, in terms of the instructors? And the environment, stress . And for level 1 wouldn't you have to attend a regular academy for all 3 phases again regardless?

cowboykenny
05-11-2011, 4:58 AM
our level 3's don't leave the station unless they are doing vacation checks. (people on vacation fill out an out of town form.

Notorious
05-11-2011, 5:58 AM
Level III's are used as station guys manning the desk to take desk reports or helping out in general light administrative support roles. They don't ever go on patrol but may be used to stand around as traffic direction or visible presence for parades or other functions, however, we make sure there is an armed officer around the area since they still wear the uniform and we don't want people to take pot shots at them.

SarcoBlaster
05-11-2011, 9:54 AM
Thanks for the responses, everyone; they were really helpful. :)

Based on your post, I assume you are self sponsored/blue in the OCSD academy. Any reason why you wouldn't want to work as a Level III reserve with OCSD? There are lots of opportunities/assignments and you could gain some great experience while you wait for the next Level II academy. I know it is a long process to get through backgrounds, but I assume the process is just as long with LASD. Why no love for OCSD?????:D
Yes and no in terms of being self-sponsored; kind of in a unique situation. I currently work for a campus safety department at a local, private university and they're paying for all of the fees and have supplied us (two other people from work are in my class) with all of the necessary gear.

I'm only going to the OCSD academy because 4 other people I work with graduated last year from there after doing the level III and level II, so they've been a huge help when it comes to procedures and whatnot. Also, I live in San Dimas, so the commute is kind of a downer as is, which is why I want to reserve for a department a little closer to home. I figure I'd still get some experience and my foot in the door for when I complete level II.

Ok i'm used to the idea of a POST basic academy or a extended academy. But if you do the academy in a module format first being level Level III then II is it the same as being a academy graduate? In that the next phase would be hiring phase> then field training?

And is the structure still Para Military, in terms of the instructors? And the environment, stress . And for level 1 wouldn't you have to attend a regular academy for all 3 phases again regardless?
The modular academy breaks it up into three phases: level III, level II, and level I. At OCSD, at least, you can do each module separately and stop whenever you want. Two people I work with went through the Fullerton academy and their program is either 10 or 12 months long and covers III, II, and I all together, so it's all or nothing.

The structure is most definitely para-military in terms of the instructors, environment, and stress. At OCSD, the stress level starts off low at level III, increases in level II, and when you're in level I, it's the same as the full-time academy.

Tacit Blue
05-11-2011, 1:47 PM
Thanks for the responses, everyone; they were really helpful. :)


Yes and no in terms of being self-sponsored; kind of in a unique situation. I currently work for a campus safety department at a local, private university and they're paying for all of the fees and have supplied us (two other people from work are in my class) with all of the necessary gear.

I'm only going to the OCSD academy because 4 other people I work with graduated last year from there after doing the level III and level II, so they've been a huge help when it comes to procedures and whatnot. Also, I live in San Dimas, so the commute is kind of a downer as is, which is why I want to reserve for a department a little closer to home. I figure I'd still get some experience and my foot in the door for when I complete level II.


The modular academy breaks it up into three phases: level III, level II, and level I. At OCSD, at least, you can do each module separately and stop whenever you want. Two people I work with went through the Fullerton academy and their program is either 10 or 12 months long and covers III, II, and I all together, so it's all or nothing.

The structure is most definitely para-military in terms of the instructors, environment, and stress. At OCSD, the stress level starts off low at level III, increases in level II, and when you're in level I, it's the same as the full-time academy.

That makes sense. Do you guys also have the infamous 'ARJIS-9's i unfortunately received a couple of those. :D Its infraction written for lint fibers on a uniform, or unpolished boots etc, or just any violation in the policy and procedures.

The format is like this:

TO: TRAINING OFFICER,OFFICER SMITH.

FROM: RECRUIT JOHN DOE #5757

SYNOPSIS: ON 10-20-2009 I FAILED TO ENSURE THAT MY UNIFORM WAS FREE FROM LOOSE THREADS OF LINT OR HAIR. THIS IS A VIOLATION OF ACADEMY POLICY AND PROCEDURE 28 etc. etc..

ORIGIN: TRAINING OFFICER SMITH DIRECTED ME TO COMPLETE AN ARJIS-9 DETAILING THE INCIDENT.


You get the idea, man those are the worst. You have to write them in all Block lettering. :banghead: no more than 3 mistakes! Or they get kicked back.

Tallship
05-11-2011, 2:12 PM
Do they drive the Astro Vans or a Marked/ unmarked unit? I think i've seen those level III's at Vista Detention Facility. When i drove past it, you can see the intake area from the street.

They drive marked units, and they wear the exact same uniforms as the patrol deputies, so if you saw someone, you wouldn't know that they were a reserve, except if they were seventy or eighty years old (don't laugh, we have some reserves that age that still do transport!).

Tallship
05-11-2011, 2:21 PM
Ok i'm used to the idea of a POST basic academy or a extended academy. But if you do the academy in a module format first being level Level III then II is it the same as being a academy graduate? In that the next phase would be hiring phase> then field training?

And is the structure still Para Military, in terms of the instructors? And the environment, stress . And for level 1 wouldn't you have to attend a regular academy for all 3 phases again regardless?

In a modular academy, you can "graduate" and then be hired after any of the modules, so if you leave after completing Level III you can be hired on as a Level III reserve, etc. If you graduate Level I, you can get hired on as either a reserve or a full time officer.

frankm
05-11-2011, 2:21 PM
I was a Level 1, we were the same as the regulars. I wouldn't want to stop at Level 3. You don't get into the sh-t at that level. I assisted detectives as a marked car for drug busts, etc. Went to stabbings, shootings, suicides, hot prowl burglaries, robberies. Foot pursuits, freeway chases. All the good stuff. And yes, as a Reserve, I worked parades, did transport, etc. But I was armed and had no supervision.

Tacit Blue
05-11-2011, 2:28 PM
They drive marked units, and they wear the exact same uniforms as the patrol deputies, so if you saw someone, you wouldn't know that they were a reserve, except if they were seventy or eighty years old (don't laugh, we have some reserves that age that still do transport!).


I thought those were RSVP or ' Victor ' units :D. I have heard of this before. Where they drive them to Jail for processing, and let the level 1's go back to patrol. First time i heard of such of thing is with Escondido Police. Someone knew a guy who got a job doing this. Makes sense it wouldn't be efficient to send a Deputy/ Officer to have them drive the prisoner. When you could have a level III do it.

Notorious
05-11-2011, 6:50 PM
Is OCSD as bad as I hear? I went to Rio back in the day and while it was bad, I heard OCSD was worse. We had a guy on the department who lasted all of 6 days at OCSD and quit a sponsored ride there. Of course, this was in comparison to my class which lost 6 people on day 1, including a sponsored guy.

SarcoBlaster
05-11-2011, 7:47 PM
For our level III class, they've been giving a LOT of grace even when we make mistakes. However, from observing the level I class they have going at the same time, the difference is night and day since they treat the level I's the same as a full-time, basic academy class.

It seems like the level I class pays for every mistake. For example, they were 30 seconds late from falling out of the parking lot and into the academy facility and got 2 sets of physical discipline for it (pushups and squat thrusts, 25 reps each). We usually hear them getting chewed out in the tactical offices, hallway, etc. Who knows how many remedial instruction reports they have to write.

jaysen
05-11-2011, 8:58 PM
Is OCSD as bad as I hear? I went to Rio back in the day and while it was bad, I heard OCSD was worse. We had a guy on the department who lasted all of 6 days at OCSD and quit a sponsored ride there. Of course, this was in comparison to my class which lost 6 people on day 1, including a sponsored guy.

Not to get off-topic but wanted to chime in on the above :)

Don't know which class you graduated Notorious, but it had definitely changed since I went through, almost 7 years now. At my agency we just hired a guy who graduated about a year or 2 now and the stories I hear from him are WEAK compared to what WE went through.. Apparently they're allowed to run in running shoes now around ? No more push ups on the grinder; Squad Leader or someone needs to touch the ground first to check if its "too hot" prior to doing push ups - this was probably a result from an incident that occurred in my class where a Cadet had to go IOD from his agency with 3rd degree burns from doing push ups on the concrete, WHOOPS.

Runs range in the 2-5 miles range, whereas we were doing Nike Hill once a week and every other day was a 5 miler.

Not to mention a recent incident where Cadets/TAC staff were caught cheating. I heard from a friend that works for the college that all STAFF at the academy was forced to resign because of the incident; no more Bocanegra, Termath, kaylor, etc...

Around the time I went through it was rumored that the two toughest academies were Rio and OCSD. I have a buddy who just went through OCSD, who is an active AF Reserve, and sad it was pretty challenging - still very anal. Its sad to see such a good reputation for RIO hondo go down the drain. I was once proud to say I attended RIO, not so much anymore.

epilepticninja
05-11-2011, 9:13 PM
I was a Level 1, we were the same as the regulars. I wouldn't want to stop at Level 3. You don't get into the sh-t at that level. I assisted detectives as a marked car for drug busts, etc. Went to stabbings, shootings, suicides, hot prowl burglaries, robberies. Foot pursuits, freeway chases. All the good stuff. And yes, as a Reserve, I worked parades, did transport, etc. But I was armed and had no supervision.

Same same. Got grandfathered in when they changed the Designated/Non-designated requirements in 1997 as I was Level 1 prior to that, but hadn't taken the Module D yet. I was working as a Level I at one agency, a Level II at another agency and on active duty in the military all at the same time. Needless to say, I didn't sleep much. I did that routine for four years, then got stationed overseas for what seemed like the rest of my life.

SarcoBlaster
05-12-2011, 12:19 AM
Biola University??

I am a Level III with OCSD. We had a large academy class and two of the guys were sponsored by Biola.

There are some pretty good assignments that you can do as a Level III with OCSD. There is a LOT more to do than sit in the station and push paper. Our uniforms, equipment,weapons, etc. is exactly the same as the full time, Level I's, Level II's, etc., so when the SHTF, it is "go" time regardless of your status.

Good luck!
Yep, Biola University. Small world, haha. I'll send you a PM tonight or tomorrow Re: OCSD reserves for more info.

Notorious
05-13-2011, 1:28 AM
For our level III class, they've been giving a LOT of grace even when we make mistakes. However, from observing the level I class they have going at the same time, the difference is night and day since they treat the level I's the same as a full-time, basic academy class.

It seems like the level I class pays for every mistake. For example, they were 30 seconds late from falling out of the parking lot and into the academy facility and got 2 sets of physical discipline for it (pushups and squat thrusts, 25 reps each). We usually hear them getting chewed out in the tactical offices, hallway, etc. Who knows how many remedial instruction reports they have to write.

Not to get off-topic but wanted to chime in on the above :)

Don't know which class you graduated Notorious, but it had definitely changed since I went through, almost 7 years now. At my agency we just hired a guy who graduated about a year or 2 now and the stories I hear from him are WEAK compared to what WE went through.. Apparently they're allowed to run in running shoes now around ? No more push ups on the grinder; Squad Leader or someone needs to touch the ground first to check if its "too hot" prior to doing push ups - this was probably a result from an incident that occurred in my class where a Cadet had to go IOD from his agency with 3rd degree burns from doing push ups on the concrete, WHOOPS.

Runs range in the 2-5 miles range, whereas we were doing Nike Hill once a week and every other day was a 5 miler.

Not to mention a recent incident where Cadets/TAC staff were caught cheating. I heard from a friend that works for the college that all STAFF at the academy was forced to resign because of the incident; no more Bocanegra, Termath, kaylor, etc...

Around the time I went through it was rumored that the two toughest academies were Rio and OCSD. I have a buddy who just went through OCSD, who is an active AF Reserve, and sad it was pretty challenging - still very anal. Its sad to see such a good reputation for RIO hondo go down the drain. I was once proud to say I attended RIO, not so much anymore.

I went through Rio 17 years ago. It was USMC-spec in every way except for the fact that we didn't get chow and had to bring our own cold sandwiches.

We ran like crazy... and got gassed and ran more, and ran at night sometimes through the cold rain and sprinklers on the field and everything got you "gigged" but my handwriting and printing improved a lot from it.

We did the front grinder, back grinder, in the gym, ran that front parking lot where 3 of our guys slipped on gravel and went IOD for a week... and one guy fell off the solid wall headfirst and was able to make it back to graduate... I still have the pictures of me being carried out on a stretcher after I fractured my kneecap in an exercise... yeah... memories....

jaysen
05-13-2011, 3:08 AM
I went through Rio 17 years ago. It was USMC-spec in every way except for the fact that we didn't get chow and had to bring our own cold sandwiches.

We ran like crazy... and got gassed and ran more, and ran at night sometimes through the cold rain and sprinklers on the field and everything got you "gigged" but my handwriting and printing improved a lot from it.

We did the front grinder, back grinder, in the gym, ran that front parking lot where 3 of our guys slipped on gravel and went IOD for a week... and one guy fell off the solid wall headfirst and was able to make it back to graduate... I still have the pictures of me being carried out on a stretcher after I fractured my kneecap in an exercise... yeah... memories....

Yup, sounds pretty similar to what I went through.

Just the other day I was going through my "GIG" papers and found one one "Healthy Sandwich Nomenclature" why it was important for a cadet not to put mayonnaise on a sandwich.... DUMB, I know. Never understood the point of "Quickie changes" until I started working. Now I can arrive 3 minutes before briefing, get dressed in blues, and waiting with 30 seconds to spare! boo-yah !

Notorious
05-13-2011, 10:39 AM
2 minutes and 30 seconds and you dare call that a Rio spec quick change?

We did ours in 2 minutes flat consistently. You guys had it easy!!!!

cowboykenny
05-22-2011, 8:11 PM
OCSD was about a 30-40% drop out rate. I heard that they changed the fitness routine to do less running people were getting hurt. Plus they built the new academy in tustin a couple years back.