PDA

View Full Version : crossdraw pros/cons?


coy80176
04-29-2011, 9:34 PM
just curious, anyone favor crossdraw?

Although I can shoot both left and right handed, I am primarily right handed, and was thinking of putting a belt holster (ie. Fobus fit for a G19) on my left side for cross draw. Seems a good "flow" of movement when drawing, but I don't see it used very often.

Your thoughts, for and/or against, and why, are appreciated.

Cheers:cheers2:

Cokebottle
04-29-2011, 9:40 PM
I think part of the problem with cross-draw is that the drawing movement is more obvious, and the gun is more exposed.

By "exposed" I mean that normally, when your radar goes off, you will turn your strong side away from the opponent. This puts the cross-draw side closer.

With the strong side turned away, it may (or may not) be possible to discreetly draw and prepare to aim without the opponent being aware of exactly what you are doing.
Cross-draw.... we all saw the end of Gran Torino ;)

jermzzzzzzz
04-29-2011, 9:41 PM
Pros
Easier Draw when seated or in a vehicle
Easier to draw with your support hand if your main hand is disabled

Cons
Slower draw when your standing
Easier for an assailant to grab or knock away the hand your drawing your weapon with.

Ubermcoupe
04-29-2011, 9:54 PM
There is a real benefit when seated, like in an office setting or driving/flying (ok only a FEW ppl fly armed). Practicing cross is sometimes difficult @ certain ranges because the muzzle is general not pointed down range.

It is a little easier to conceal (bcuz I got a round belly :kest:) and "printing" is not so obvious but from a functional point of view for CCW I prefer a strong side carry.

scootle
04-29-2011, 9:59 PM
Some people also point out the drawstroke for crossdraw tends to muzzle yourself... ymmv.

WWDHD?
04-30-2011, 12:59 AM
If someone gets in close enough to grab the gun and draw it its now pointed right at you and easily fired. Although it looks cool, not worth the risk (or so I've been taught).

ruchik
04-30-2011, 4:00 AM
I think part of the problem with cross-draw is that the drawing movement is more obvious, and the gun is more exposed.

By "exposed" I mean that normally, when your radar goes off, you will turn your strong side away from the opponent. This puts the cross-draw side closer.

With the strong side turned away, it may (or may not) be possible to discreetly draw and prepare to aim without the opponent being aware of exactly what you are doing.
Cross-draw.... we all saw the end of Gran Torino ;)

1. I believe that it's the other way around; with a cross draw, it's less obvious to someone standing behind you or in front of you that you're drawing a gun, IF your hands are hidden from view. The sweeping motion to a strong side draw is pretty obvious.

2. You can draw with either hand.

3. It is more exposed to someone attempting to grab your gun. But let's think about it for a moment here. If someone grabs for your gun on your strong side, what would you do then? Clamp down with your strong arm, strike with your other. In the case of a cross draw, you can clamp down with your reaction hand, and strike with your strong hand and end it right there.

Cons:

1. It's easy to sweep body parts if you're not paying attention.

2. You're not drawing into your target, but rather across it.

Kyle1886
04-30-2011, 5:31 AM
Con: if for some reason your are on your belly or in a position of cover, or kneeling, drawing may be an issue. You cannot always be standing should you need to draw. It's a bit awkward if on your back too...but then I'm old and athritic.

Regards,
Kyle

USMC 82-86
04-30-2011, 8:37 AM
Pros: Seated position it is great. If a attacker is approaching from the rear it is a benefit as well.

Cons: Plenty, can flag yourself, attacker can keep you from clearing the weapon completely. The draw is telegraphed, and did I mention you can flag yourself, weapon can be turned on you quickly if in close quarters. Under stress from this position you may fire rounds toward innocent bystanders prematurely. I know you may have good trigger control but stress does funny things to people. I saw a story about a police shooting. The officer drew his weapon during a traffic stop when the suspect produced a weapon. The car video showed that the officer fired 3 shots into the pavement while drawing his weapon. High stress caused the officer to forget his principals for safety and he placed his finger on the trigger before getting on target. We were drilled to the point of exhaustion in the Marines on muzzle control and trigger control. Being involved in several fire fights in CQB it payed off. Most patrol officers, unless in special units don't get enough ongoing training with their service weapon. Qualifying every few months is not sufficient.

Remember if this is going to be you primary style of carry, practice, practice and more practice. Standing, seated, knealing and from your back and side. Finger off the trigger until on target. Practice slow and deliberate until it becomes automatic.

nevil
04-30-2011, 9:01 AM
I have been think about cross draw my self. One point is if you have other stuff on your strong side. Like a muilti tool or phone the cross draw is easyer to carry.

coy80176
04-30-2011, 9:14 AM
All - very good points to consider, for and against....lots to think about before making a commitment to roll with the crossdraw.

I have a leather Galco holster for my Sig 229 that is strong side/right handed and really like it. As I mentioned previoiusly, I'm interested in picking up a Fobus (or the like) for my Glock 19, which are adjustable for different angle/draw options...thus my query to you all.

Thanks again!:)

bsg
04-30-2011, 10:04 AM
the late Bruce Nelson's "Professional" with straight drop can be worn strong side or cross draw. the late Milt Sparks (with permission of Bruce Nelson) began making his version and called it the "55BN." the 55BN is still available from the folks at Milt Sparks; very nice holster.

bsg
04-30-2011, 10:23 AM
imo the Alessi DOJ is another good holster that with no cant, can be worn strong side or cross draw.

scootle
04-30-2011, 11:24 AM
One of the other (maybe small) issues is that very few schools will probably teach you cross draw these days as a general option. Best to ask around if you plan to train as you carry. Good luck!

BigDogatPlay
04-30-2011, 12:43 PM
Pro : ease of draw when seated, particularly in a car.

Cons:

- poor technique on draw stroke muzzles weak side arm

- draw stroke can be easily interfered with / overcome / reversed in close quarters

- defeats strong side bladed body position, weapon is not protected by body

- significantly increases chance of gun takeaway

Many of these are reasons why LEA largely banned crossdraw in the 1970's. The ease of use when seated in a car can be solved by staging your firearm to an accessible position when you get in the car.

bsg
04-30-2011, 9:59 PM
Pro : ease of draw when seated, particularly in a car.

Cons:

- poor technique on draw stroke muzzles weak side arm

- draw stroke can be easily interfered with / overcome / reversed in close quarters

- defeats strong side bladed body position, weapon is not protected by body

- significantly increases chance of gun takeaway

Many of these are reasons why LEA largely banned crossdraw in the 1970's. The ease of use when seated in a car can be solved by staging your firearm to an accessible position when you get in the car.


good post.