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DarkLuminor
04-23-2011, 8:34 PM
Help! I need some guidance here.

I went to the range for the first time with my XD 9 service, shot @ about 15-20 feet distance.

My shots are always landed lower than my aim and sometimes to the left. (I am right handed)

What did I do wrong?

Ubermcoupe
04-23-2011, 8:38 PM
I suggest checking where you press the trigger (pad of finger vs crease) how you are squeezing with your support hand and possible anticipation of recoil.

Hope that helps. :D
http://www.katychl.com/images/handgun_shooting_symptom_chart.jpg

HCz
04-23-2011, 8:39 PM
Yup.

If you haven't please consider taking a basic handgun class. It will improve your shooting.

pontiacpratt
04-23-2011, 8:40 PM
To Jerking the trigger and flinching.. Low and left is common for right handed people especially for first time shooters. Suggest dry-fire to try and cure the flinching and for muscle memory where the trigger breaks and while doing that practice slowly squeezing the trigger and be "Surprised" then the hammer falls... or in your case the striker falls. My humble opinion based on your information.

PandaLuv
04-23-2011, 8:40 PM
I am a noob too, it's the way you pull your trigger.
I recommend taking a course or having an experienced friend show you how it's done.

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 8:49 PM
Help! I need some guidance here.

I went to the range for the first time with my XD 9 service, shot @ about 15-20 feet distance.

My shots are always landed lower than my aim and sometimes to the left. (I am right handed)

What did I do wrong?

its possible your sights are off. personally, when i take any of my handguns to the range, i practice reflex shooting, and trying to visualize the trajectory of the round rather than use the sights.

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 8:51 PM
To Jerking the trigger and flinching.. Low and left is common for right handed people especially for first time shooters. Suggest dry-fire to try and cure the flinching and for muscle memory where the trigger breaks and while doing that practice slowly squeezing the trigger and be "Surprised" then the hammer falls... or in your case the striker falls. My humble opinion based on your information.

if anyone is going to do this type of practicing, id highly advise using snap caps. dry firing on an empty chamber can potentially damage the firearm

pontiacpratt
04-23-2011, 8:51 PM
its possible your sights are off. personally, when i take any of my handguns to the range, i practice reflex shooting, and trying to visualize the trajectory of the round rather than use the sights.
99.999% of the time it the shooter. He said it's his first trip out I'd blame the inaccuracy on his inexperience before poorly installed factory sights.

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 8:55 PM
99.999% of the time it the shooter. He said it's his first trip out I'd blame the inaccuracy on his inexperience before poorly installed factory sights.

could be. its difficult to say exactly what the problem is though

pontiacpratt
04-23-2011, 8:57 PM
could be. its difficult to say exactly what the problem is though

Next range trip, go up and down the lines looking for the best shooter... ask them to shoot the gun... if it's dead on... it's the shooter... if it's low and left.... its the gun. lol:D

AAShooter
04-23-2011, 8:57 PM
Another consideration is that the length of pull of that gun is too long for you/your grip. There should be a space between the trigger finger and the firing side of the firearm when your finger is on the trigger. If not, this will tend to push you shots to the left (for a right handed shooter)

Most likely, it is a trigger control issue.

IntoForever
04-23-2011, 8:58 PM
Have someone load your gun for you and place a snap cap or two in it. When you hit the snap cap you will see if you are flinching.

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 9:00 PM
Next range trip, go up and down the lines looking for the best shooter... ask them to shoot the gun... if it's dead on... it's the shooter... if it's low and left.... its the gun. lol:D

heh, thatl work!!

Chief-7700
04-23-2011, 9:05 PM
if anyone is going to do this type of practicing, id highly advise using snap caps. dry firing on an empty chamber can potentially damage the firearm

That is a major load of BS that your spreading.

Turbinator
04-23-2011, 9:11 PM
That is a major load of BS that your spreading.

That's a little bit harsh, but I do agree that a majority of modern centerfire firearms can be dry fired without any damage being done.

Turby

Chief-7700
04-23-2011, 9:29 PM
That's a little bit harsh, but I do agree that a majority of modern centerfire firearms can be dry fired without any damage being done.

Turby

The brutal reality of the truth hurts sometimes. Sorry if came across as harsh, will try to be more PC next time. Have been doing dry practice with a 1911 for the past 40 years
with out a problem.

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 9:33 PM
That is a major load of BS that your spreading.

if you look closely, you will notice how i worded it "can potentially" cause harm. that statement is different than "will without doubt cause harm"

Chief-7700
04-23-2011, 9:46 PM
if you look closely, you will notice how i worded it "can potentially" cause harm. that statement is different than "will without doubt cause harm"

Please explain how "can potentially cause harm"

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 9:54 PM
Please explain how "can potentially cause harm"

it has to do with hyper extending the spring on the hammer of the firearm.

stretch the spring too far and it will deform

Cokebottle
04-23-2011, 9:55 PM
if anyone is going to do this type of practicing, id highly advise using snap caps. dry firing on an empty chamber can potentially damage the firearm
Only on a rimfire.

Centerfire weapons are not a problem to dry-fire.
The best use for snap-caps is for practice loading mags and chambering/clearing, plus creating and clearing malfunctions.

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 10:01 PM
Only on a rimfire.

Centerfire weapons are not a problem to dry-fire.
The best use for snap-caps is for practice loading mags and chambering/clearing, plus creating and clearing malfunctions.

well, i think it really has to do with the design of the rifle. some types probably can be dry fired indefinitely with no damage, while some may be damaged if it happens enough.

personally, i try to baby my possessions.

oso grande
04-23-2011, 10:04 PM
You're flinching, IE: anticipating the recoil and compensating as you pull the trigger.
I suggest that you have a buddy hand you the gun, sometimes loaded other times with nothing in the chamber. also...I think "follow through" is important.
I actually try to "steer" the bullet out of the barrel.
My 2 centavos.

Oso Grande

Chief-7700
04-23-2011, 10:08 PM
it has to do with hyper extending the spring on the hammer of the firearm.

stretch the spring too far and it will deform

How does dry practice hyper extend the hammer spring on a handgun? Wouldn't
actual firing the gun do the same thing? Are you referring to a striker fired gun or a firing pin gun?

Cokebottle
04-23-2011, 10:09 PM
personally, i try to baby my possessions.
And you'll detonate a cartridge in it that creates 65,000psi and sends a 75gr piece of copper plated lead down the barrel at nearly 3000fps?

With extremely few exceptions... and no exceptions on modern firearms, dry-firing will not cause any damage to centerfire weapons.

Rimfire is a completely different story. Don't dry fire a .22 or .17.

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 10:11 PM
How does dry practice hyper extend the hammer spring on a handgun? Wouldn't
actual firing the gun do the same thing? Are you referring to a striker fired gun or a firing pin gun?

no, because the primer on the round will prevent the hammer from extending too far

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 10:13 PM
And you'll detonate a cartridge in it that creates 65,000psi and sends a 75gr piece of copper plated lead down the barrel at nearly 3000fps?

With extremely few exceptions... and no exceptions on modern firearms, dry-firing will not cause any damage to centerfire weapons.

Rimfire is a completely different story. Don't dry fire a .22 or .17.

thats a different kind of stress concentration. its subjecting the weapon to something that it was intended to do.

as for dry firing, you're probably right... probably. but its a little extreme to say anything with absolute 100% certainty.

Cokebottle
04-23-2011, 10:15 PM
it has to do with hyper extending the spring on the hammer of the firearm.

stretch the spring too far and it will deform
??????

Take a good look at the hammer and where it impacts the gun.
Now look at the firing pin.
Now look at the breech face and manually push the firing pin in. See that it doesn't protrude?
The inertia of the firing pin causes it to move forward enough to hit the primer. That's part of the safety mechanism. Gently laying the hammer on the firing pin will not even put the pin in contact with the primer.

Whether there is a round chambered or not, the hammer's primary impact force is on the area surrounding the back of the firing pin. That part of the gun doesn't move. The action and force on the hammer and spring are identical whether being live or dry fired.


On some older (40+ years ago) guns, dry firing could cause the firing pin stop to slam into the rear of the breech, damaging the firing pin.
That is no longer an issue, and never has been an issue for striker-fired guns like the Glock and XD.

Cokebottle
04-23-2011, 10:17 PM
but its a little extreme to say anything with absolute 100% certainty.
I've got over $10,000 worth of guns that I've dry-fired for years without a problem.

In fact, to disassemble the Glock and the XD for cleaning, you are required to pull the trigger on an empty chamber.

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 10:19 PM
??????

Take a good look at the hammer and where it impacts the gun.
Now look at the firing pin.
Now look at the breech face and manually push the firing pin in. See that it doesn't protrude?
The inertia of the firing pin causes it to move forward enough to hit the primer. That's part of the safety mechanism. Gently laying the hammer on the firing pin will not even put the pin in contact with the primer.

Whether there is a round chambered or not, the hammer's primary impact force is on the area surrounding the back of the firing pin. That part of the gun doesn't move. The action and force on the hammer and spring are identical whether being live or dry fired.


On some older (40+ years ago) guns, dry firing could cause the firing pin stop to slam into the rear of the breech, damaging the firing pin.
That is no longer an issue, and never has been an issue for striker-fired guns like the Glock and XD.

not all firearms are designed exactly the same way. it is at least possible that there are some modern firearms that could be damaged by dry firing.

Chief-7700
04-23-2011, 10:19 PM
no, because the primer on the round will prevent the hammer from extending too far

Ok! I give up.

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 10:21 PM
I've got over $10,000 worth of guns that I've dry-fired for years without a problem.

In fact, to disassemble the Glock and the XD for cleaning, you are required to pull the trigger on an empty chamber.

thats good... have you tried dry firing every single type of modern firearm available to justify the statement that all firearms can be dry fired indefinitely without any possibility of damage?

Cokebottle
04-23-2011, 10:21 PM
no, because the primer on the round will prevent the hammer from extending too far
YKRMcTlbWTs

Watch carefully. See the firing pin "bounce" away and back into the hammer? The hammer itself is NEVER directly in contact with a part that is at the same time in direct contact with the primer.
The hammer stops at the back of the slide every time.

Cokebottle
04-23-2011, 10:26 PM
it is at least possible that there are some modern firearms that could be damaged by dry firing.
No, it's not

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 10:26 PM
i was under the impression that most firearms had some kind of spring attached to the firing pin. obviously, this doesnt apply to all types, but definitely some of them.

Chief-7700
04-23-2011, 10:27 PM
YKRMcTlbWTs

Watch carefully. See the firing pin "bounce" away and back into the hammer? The hammer itself is NEVER directly in contact with a part that is at the same time in direct contact with the primer.
The hammer stops at the back of the slide every time.

Check your PM's

DPC
04-23-2011, 10:28 PM
Aim higher to the right:seeya:

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 10:29 PM
No, it's not

i see... so you're familiar with every single design in production?

Cokebottle
04-23-2011, 10:35 PM
i see... so you're familiar with every single design in production?
Pretty much. The designs are all quite similar.
It's either hammer/pin or striker.

The hammer/pin arrangement in the 1911 is identical to the arrangement in the AR15, except that the AR15 does not have a spring to hold it to the rear of the BCG, the 1911 does.
And the extra .002" compression of the firing pin spring is not causing any additional stress that will lead to early failure.

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 10:40 PM
i dont know man. i think its questionable to say anything with absolute certainty.

besides, there is a difference between damaged, and broken to the point of failure

Chief-7700
04-23-2011, 10:51 PM
i dont know man. i think its questionable to say anything with absolute certainty.

besides, there is a difference between damaged, and broken to the point of failure

You are right 'I don't know man" I suggest that you get some professional Firearms training, since you have a lot to learn. Good night!

locosway
04-23-2011, 10:52 PM
Rimfires can be damaged by dry firing the weapon. Furthermore, Glock has recently advised people who engage in a lot of dry practice to use snap caps to lessen the wear on the firearm. However, Glock will still replace and fix the firearm if it happens to develop problems from dry practice.

The best thing to do is consult with the firearm manufacturer to see what they recommend.

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 10:55 PM
You are right 'I don't know man" I suggest that you get some professional Firearms training, since you have a lot to learn. Good night!

easy there bruh, no need to get upset

Voo
04-23-2011, 10:58 PM
easy there bruh, no need to get upset

TROLL ALERT

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 11:00 PM
TROLL ALERT

read the first page and youl understand exactly why this thread went the direction that it did

elSquid
04-23-2011, 11:00 PM
No, it's not

S&W M&Ps have been through a couple revisions for their strikers. Dry firing older versions sans snap caps did result in broker strikers. YMMV, google for details...

-- Michael

Chief-7700
04-23-2011, 11:07 PM
easy there bruh, no need to get upset

I'm not upset! Just puzzled by your lack of knowledge of how modern centerfire
handguns function. A bit of my history have been shooting and rebuilding 1911's for close to 40 years. One last question what spring weights are you using for the recoil, firing pin, and hammer spring's are you using?
Chief

Voo
04-23-2011, 11:09 PM
read the first page and youl understand exactly why this thread went the direction that it did

I did and you're a TROLL.. I'm putting you on my ignore list.. :-)

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 11:10 PM
I'm not upset! Just puzzled by your lack of knowledge of how modern centerfire
handguns function. A bit of my history have been shooting and rebuilding 1911's for close to 40 years. One last question what spring weights are you using for the recoil, firing pin, and hammer spring's are you using?
Chief

were talking about all modern types of firearms. i stated that multiple times, not just 1911s. as for spring weights, i really dont know. i use what came with the firearm. how exactly does that apply to what were discussing here anyway?

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 11:11 PM
I did and you're a TROLL.. I'm putting you on my ignore list.. :-)

really?

well, ok

Chief-7700
04-23-2011, 11:21 PM
were talking about all modern types of firearms. i stated that multiple times, not just 1911s. as for spring weights, i really dont know. i use what came with the firearm. how exactly does that apply to what were discussing here anyway?

As stated before " You have a lot to lean about modern day centerfire handguns" Don't be an arrogant A**! You have been given information and advice from handgun shooter's who have been around many different handgun platforms, probably longer that you have been alive. Accept the information that you have been given.
Good Night
Chief

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 11:22 PM
As stated before " You have a lot to lean about modern day centerfire handguns" Don't be an arrogant A**! You have been given information and advice from handgun shooter's who have been around many different handgun platforms, probably longer that you have been alive. Accept the information that you have been given.
Good Night
Chief

i never said i was an expert on the subject. all i said was that dry firing could potentially damage a firearm. which is true

Chief-7700
04-23-2011, 11:43 PM
i never said i was an expert on the subject. all i said was that dry firing could potentially damage a firearm. which is true

You have your belief's about dry fire practice and I have mine. Miles apart. May be one day you will come over to the dark side and realize that dry practice is a good thing that does not hurt the gun. Please let us know how the lack of dry practice works for you? I shoot close to 1500+ rounds of .45ACP per month and do dry practice 30 minutes per day. ]
Happy Bunny Day
Going to bed
Chief

cali_armz
04-23-2011, 11:52 PM
You have your belief's about dry fire practice and I have mine. Miles apart. May be one day you will come over to the dark side and realize that dry practice is a good thing that does not hurt the gun. Please let us know how the lack of dry practice works for you? I shoot close to 1500+ rounds of .45ACP per month and do dry practice 30 minutes per day. ]
Happy Bunny Day
Going to bed
Chief

i have no desire to dry fire any of my firearms. when i practice, i do so with live ammunition at the shooting range

XDshooter
04-24-2011, 12:07 AM
i have no desire to dry fire any of my firearms. when i practice, i do so with live ammunition at the shooting range

Dude, dry-firing is essential in developing good trigger technique. It develops proper muscle memory for "sqeezing" the trigger. AND the best part is that it's free.

Get over yourself. You heard one thing from one person and you obviously held it to be truth. This reveals the kind of person you are. <- full of FUD.

cali_armz
04-24-2011, 12:16 AM
Dude, dry-firing is essential in developing good trigger technique. It develops proper muscle memory for "sqeezing" the trigger. AND the best part is that it's free.

Get over yourself. You heard one thing from one person and you obviously held it to be truth. This reveals the kind of person you are. <- full of FUD.

well obviously, someone must be full of fud when they say something like "dry firing could potentially damage a firearm"

never mind the instances mentioned above where firearms were damaged because of dry firing

cali_armz
04-24-2011, 1:16 AM
here is a thread which addresses the issue of dry firing. it even has a picture of a glock which has been severely damaged

http://www.northeastshooters.com/vbulletin/threads/24122-CAUTION-from-Glock-on-Dry-Firing!

atomicwedgy
04-24-2011, 8:07 AM
buy dummy rounds. load magazines with them scattered in. you will see if you are anticipating fire. It also is good practice for emergency FTF situations.

locosway
04-24-2011, 9:30 AM
i have no desire to dry fire any of my firearms. when i practice, i do so with live ammunition at the shooting range

Dry practice is an essential part of becoming a good marksman. Sure, you can do it without, but it's a lot harder. Dry practice is free, and if done moderately (less than hundreds of thousands of times) does not damage the gun. However, they do make snap caps for just this reason.

cali_armz
04-24-2011, 10:02 AM
Dry practice is an essential part of becoming a good marksman. Sure, you can do it without, but it's a lot harder. Dry practice is free, and if done moderately (less than hundreds of thousands of times) does not damage the gun. However, they do make snap caps for just this reason.

yea, i agree with you. you know, it never really occurred to me to do dry fire practicing, but it makes sense that it would help with being proficient with a firearm

rdmax
04-24-2011, 10:28 AM
Snap caps are a waste for trying to protect your center fire gun from dry fire practise. I purchased some, just in case they did help. Well, after snapping off a bunch of dry fires, the fake brass primer got dented and became very deep to the point I doubt that it was preventing the firing pin from going the full distance on hammer impact.

As for helping with trigger control when used in random order in loaded magazine, this does work very well. If you flinch, you will know when you fire on a dummy round.

ken worth
04-24-2011, 10:34 AM
i have no desire to dry fire any of my firearms. when i practice, i do so with live ammunition at the shooting range

I'll bet this guy drives a prius.

if you don't dry practice ,you'll only get worse not better.
live fire validates your dry practice. in your dry practice you can see your faults and correct them. if you live fire only you will ingrain your faults and only get worse.

but then maybe you don't have any faults. can you walk on water too?

Cokebottle
04-24-2011, 10:47 AM
here is a thread which addresses the issue of dry firing. it even has a picture of a glock which has been severely damaged

http://www.northeastshooters.com/vbulletin/threads/24122-CAUTION-from-Glock-on-Dry-Firing!
http://wikkidpissah.com/ftp/lens/Cracked_breech2.jpg

That was absolutely not caused by dry firing.

If you had showed a picture of a hole punched out in the very center around the firing pin, I might believe you, but this link is just another example of your typical "I heard from a gun shop"

It's time to sit back, relax, and LEARN, before dispensing advice that you are not qualified to dispense.

Cokebottle
04-24-2011, 10:50 AM
I'll bet this guy drives a prius.

if you don't dry practice ,you'll only get worse not better.
live fire validates your dry practice. in your dry practice you can see your faults and correct them. if you live fire only you will ingrain your faults and only get worse.

but then maybe you don't have any faults. can you walk on water too?
He goes to the range and shoots without using his sights too.
"Reflex shooting"

Ya, it has it's place, but not for a new shooter.... and certainly not for a new shooter and a public range. If I see him doing that when I'm there, the RO is getting a call.

gorenut
04-24-2011, 10:50 AM
I think some members are coming down too hard on cali_armz on a topic that has been debated to be plausible on both sides (edited because someone insists on de-railing the OP's post and calling it being on "topic at hand"). Its true there has been center-fire guns that can be damaged from dry-firing (early M&Ps, early USPs, some Sigs, just to name a few). Bottom line, use snap caps that actually cushion the firing pin if you need that cheap peace of mind. The plus side is you get a tool that allows you to perform other function drills.

but I think something that is more relevant to the OP is arguing discussing.....
i have no desire to dry fire any of my firearms. when i practice, i do so with live ammunition at the shooting range

Snap caps or not, but I think if you're not dry-firing.. you're really short-changing yourself in training. I remember reading an article/interview from Brian Enos how back in the days.. he'd spend a big portion of his days before the competition just dry-firing in the hotel before even setting foot on the range where he's going to compete (not sure the legalities of this anymore.. sure it varies from state to state).

Also...
http://grayguns.com/dry-fire-secrets-of-the-pros/

and for those that aren't familiar with Bruce Gray... he's pretty much considered THE guy you go to for Sig gunsmithing and as far as his shooting abilities.. I've seen Randy Lee of Apex vouch his skills many times, not to mention those who have gone to his practical shooting classes.

XDshooter
04-24-2011, 8:09 PM
here is a thread which addresses the issue of dry firing. it even has a picture of a glock which has been severely damaged

http://www.northeastshooters.com/vbulletin/threads/24122-CAUTION-from-Glock-on-Dry-Firing!


You keep validating what we all know about your character. You see/hear one thing and believe it to be true.

You see that the OP in that thread stated the damage is by dry-firing. You take that to be true without any proof to back it up, just the OPs say-so.

The damage to that Glock was most definitely not caused by dry-firing. You are a fool to think otherwise.

cali_armz
04-24-2011, 9:04 PM
all these assumptions you make off one simple statement are absurd.

but back to the topic at hand... take a good look at this picture. what do you think could have caused this damage?

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y50/wriggly1dog/GlockBreechFaceExcessiveDryFireDamage6.jpg

gorenut
04-24-2011, 9:06 PM
Well.. so much for the OP's thread...

locosway
04-24-2011, 9:07 PM
all these assumptions you make off one simple statement are absurd.

but back to the topic at hand... take a good look at this picture. what do you think could have caused this damage?

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y50/wriggly1dog/GlockBreechFaceExcessiveDryFireDamage6.jpg

Hard to say without being able to inspect the slide. However, I don't think that was from dry firing... That looks like a violent change in the metal, not a slow fatigue.

Cokebottle
04-24-2011, 9:09 PM
but back to the topic at hand... take a good look at this picture. what do you think could have caused this damage
Materials defect in the slide? Hot reloads?
Could be any of a number of things. Dry fire didn't cause the breech face to fracture. Something else did.

SixPointEight
04-24-2011, 9:10 PM
thats a different kind of stress concentration. its subjecting the weapon to something that it was intended to do.

as for dry firing, you're probably right... probably. but its a little extreme to say anything with absolute 100% certainty.

Many guns require a dry fire to disassemble, and most manuals recommend a dry fire during the course of a function test after every cleaning.

The person who posted the target with the directions on it, I find those to be helpful, except the fact that low and left they suggest is a trigger pull issue. I find it to be far more commonly a flinch issue.

techshot
04-24-2011, 9:11 PM
all these assumptions you make off one simple statement are absurd.

but back to the topic at hand... take a good look at this picture. what do you think could have caused this damage?

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y50/wriggly1dog/GlockBreechFaceExcessiveDryFireDamage6.jpg

Looks like someone got tipsy at the reloading press...

cali_armz
04-24-2011, 9:11 PM
He goes to the range and shoots without using his sights too.
"Reflex shooting"

Ya, it has it's place, but not for a new shooter.... and certainly not for a new shooter and a public range. If I see him doing that when I'm there, the RO is getting a call.

more assumptions eh? let me guess. you think im new to shooting because i said dry firing could potentially damage a firearm?

how exactly does that make sense?

cali_armz
04-24-2011, 9:14 PM
Materials defect in the slide? Hot reloads?
Could be any of a number of things. Dry fire didn't cause the breech face to fracture. Something else did.

well, it is difficult to say exactly, but you will notice how the material forms an angled plane opening in the direction of the barrel. this means it was caused by some kind of force pushing from the direction of the firing pin.

Cokebottle
04-24-2011, 9:14 PM
The person who posted the target with the directions on it, I find those to be helpful, except the fact that low and left they suggest is a trigger pull issue. I find it to be far more commonly a flinch issue.
Similar here. Snap-cap practice (loaded in the mag in an unknown position) revealed that I was anticipating recoil and pushing down and left at the moment of trigger break.

Cokebottle
04-24-2011, 9:15 PM
more assumptions eh? let me guess. you think im new to shooting because i said dry firing could potentially damage a firearm?

how exactly does that make sense?
I think you're new to shooting because you said that you were new to shooting in a post a few days ago.

cali_armz
04-24-2011, 9:17 PM
I think you're new to shooting because you said that you were new to shooting in a post a few days ago.

haha yea ok man. and where was that post?

cali_armz
04-24-2011, 9:21 PM
Similar here. Snap-cap practice (loaded in the mag in an unknown position) revealed that I was anticipating recoil and pushing down and left at the moment of trigger break.

if you use snap caps when you dry fire practice then why are you trying to argue the point that dry firing on an empty chamber is fine for the firearm?

SixPointEight
04-24-2011, 9:23 PM
Similar here. Snap-cap practice (loaded in the mag in an unknown position) revealed that I was anticipating recoil and pushing down and left at the moment of trigger break.
Every now and then we all have to pull out the snap caps and train a flinch away haha. But I know I'm doing it when I see my groups opening to the lower left.

well, it is difficult to say exactly, but you will notice how the material forms an angled plane opening in the direction of the barrel. this means it was caused by some kind of force pushing from the direction of the firing pin.

It could be that, or it could be that a crack formed from something else, then the final blow came from that side. You could now say that Glock agrees it's from dry firing, but then I'd say something like, Glock has been known to hide it's mistakes in the past, blame it on something else, and then fix the problem graciously.

SixPointEight
04-24-2011, 9:25 PM
if you use snap caps when you dry fire practice then why are you trying to argue the point that dry firing on an empty chamber is fine for the firearm?

He's not using them for dry fire. He's placing them in a mag in order to detect movement in the gun/sights in the last microsecond before the shot would break. movement that is next to impossible to see when a cartridge goes off and the recoil overcomes any movement. This in combination with dry fire are some of the best, most common exercises GOOD shooters use to IMPROVE their shooting.

pontiacpratt
04-24-2011, 9:27 PM
I hear by declare, with the power vested in me due to the fact I suggested dry-fire originally, that we need to stop this bickering. The OP is probably rolling his eyes at the childish behavior. He was looking for guidance and ended up with a 79 post thread on dry-firing. Let's leave it be.:shrug:

cali_armz
04-24-2011, 9:29 PM
I hear by declare, with the power vested in me due to the fact I suggested dry-fire originally, that we need to stop this bickering. The OP is probably rolling his eyes at the childish behavior. He was looking for guidance and ended up with a 79 post thread on dry-firing. Let's leave it be.:shrug:

im all for that. i have no desire to get into e-fights. it just makes everyone look immature

locosway
04-25-2011, 5:16 PM
I have to use them because if I don't it wakes up my wife. The snap caps make the pin fall much quieter.

MaHoTex
04-25-2011, 5:51 PM
Next range trip, go up and down the lines looking for the best shooter... ask them to shoot the gun... if it's dead on... it's the shooter... if it's low and left.... its the gun. lol:D

Exactly what I did... It was the gun. Shooting 8+ inches left and 6 or so low at about 15 yards. Oh, and it was an XD9 as well.

Got a site pusher and adjust the site myself. Boy was that a bear to move.

LBDamned
04-25-2011, 6:04 PM
WoW! Talk about OT!!!

OP asked about low/left with an XD9 and the thread went 2.5 pages on and on about dry firing a variety of firearms... wtf?

norcal rider
04-25-2011, 6:31 PM
Help! I need some guidance here.

I went to the range for the first time with my XD 9 service, shot @ about 15-20 feet distance.

My shots are always landed lower than my aim and sometimes to the left. (I am right handed)

What did I do wrong?

Dark Luminor,

I have an XD 9 Service. Two things I learned from taking this weapon to the range:

High Bore Axis - This affected me personally and I did not find anyone else having this issue. I found that I was looking over the top of the front sight and breaking my wrist down while shooting. YMMV.

Sights - Once I figured out I breaking my wrist, I was placing POA/POI on top of the sight. This meant I was still shooting low. I tried covering the POA/POI with the sight and i started hitting the target.

Dunno if you checked the user manual, but I believe this is covered in the manual. Good luck.

Cokebottle
04-25-2011, 6:41 PM
Dunno if you checked the user manual, but I believe this is covered in the manual. Good luck.
Manual is the same as the Glock and Beretta manuals....
6-o'clock sight picture, "but some guns shoot point of aim"

IOTW: It depends on the shooter ;)