PDA

View Full Version : Any advice: Blinking when the pistol fires...


BigFatGuy
04-21-2011, 3:00 PM
Training classes were a good way to get started, but on the really niggling little details of shooting I've gotten more good advice from this forum's users then anywhere else... (and it's usually a post somebody makes as an afterthought just before the thread vanishes to the 2nd page...)

So, here's one more stupid newbie question: Any advice on not blinking every time the pistol fires? with .22/9mm it's not an issue, .40 is a little bit worse, but with anything bigger I have the damnedest time keeping my eyes open just as the pistol fires. I guess feeling the shock wave through my glasses is the trigger...

Any exercises, tricks, advice?

(and, for the record, thanks to the advice I've found here I'm putting all 10 rounds in a 4" circle at 25'... now I just need to get "my" 4" circle on top of the 4" circle printed on the target and I'll be golden. ;-)

Thanks, all.

colddeadhands
04-21-2011, 3:03 PM
practice by dry firing.

NorCal Einstein
04-21-2011, 3:05 PM
practice by dry firing.

But he's having a reaction to the sound. I don't believe this is a reaction to the motion of pulling the trigger to the rear.

himurax13
04-21-2011, 3:06 PM
practice by dry firing.

and if that doesn't work, I could stand next to you while shooting and rap you in the hand with a ruler whenever you blink while firing. I am sure, that will sove the problem quickly ;).

DVSmith
04-21-2011, 3:07 PM
Why is blinking a problem?

As long as you maintain your sight alignment and sight picture while squeezing the trigger, if you blink after the round is fired it should be a non-issue.

BigFatGuy
04-21-2011, 3:07 PM
practice by dry firing.

It doesn't happen when dry-firing.

The louder or the more muzzle flash the round has, the worse I do it.

BigFatGuy
04-21-2011, 3:07 PM
and if that doesn't work, I could stand next to you while shooting and rap you in the hand with a ruler whenever you blink while firing. I am sure, that will sove the problem quickly ;).

Now, that might work. ;-)

Come to think of it, my wife was Catholic... I wonder if they taught her ruler-fu.

Therunningidiot
04-21-2011, 3:18 PM
Get someone to load your mags for you, and have them mix in snap caps, snake shot, and your standard ammo. Not only will it help with flinching/blinking, it'll help you recover from malfunctions at the same time.

wu_dot_com
04-21-2011, 3:21 PM
Why is blinking a problem?

As long as you maintain your sight alignment and sight picture while squeezing the trigger, if you blink after the round is fired it should be a non-issue.

its a big problem because he is not maintaining proper follow through.

Tripper
04-21-2011, 3:22 PM
If it's the sound or flash, try diff ear protection like electronic, maybe tinted slightly glasses

wu_dot_com
04-21-2011, 3:24 PM
here is a suggestion. double on the ear protection.

do not anticipate the shotbreak point. if you know where that point is, your mind will prepare yourself to blink. the trigger should be a roll off rather than break like glass.

third, shoot with both eye open. if you have one eye close, its easier for you to close the open eye. if both eyes were open, than you will sequent rather than close both eye.

dagger10k
04-21-2011, 3:28 PM
Practice. You have to practice shooting the larger rounds, the ones that make you blink, until you don't blink anymore.

There are several tricks to this one, but the one I like best is the simplest. This is a Brian Enos tip. Look at the front sight, but put all of your attention into your face. Feel what your face is doing. When you can really feel everything going on in your face (blinking, etc), it will be easier to stop.

That, and just getting used to it. If shooting a .45 makes you blink, you need to shoot the .45 until you don't blink anymore. It will probably take some time.

BigFatGuy
04-21-2011, 3:37 PM
you mean I have to spend... MORE time at the range?

This is so... disappointing. ;-)

no, really... disappointing... ;-)

;-)

Ninja45
04-21-2011, 3:48 PM
I agree with the doubling up of the hearing protection. I once read that it is not the recoil that causes a shooter to flinch, it is the muzzle blast. The louder the blast, the more the tendency to flinch or in your case, "blink".

DVSmith
04-21-2011, 4:04 PM
its a big problem because he is not maintaining proper follow through.

That is different than blinking. Blinking is a pretty natural reaction when a firearm discharges.

So my thought was that blinking shouldn't prevent him from watching sight alignment and coming back on sight picture after the shot was fired.

Am I taking the blinking description too literally here? Maybe he meant to say he is flinching?

BigFatGuy
04-21-2011, 4:13 PM
I'm doing pretty well at not flinching (as in, moving my hands, torso, or head in response to the muzzle blast), but my eyes do close pretty strongly... which then means I have to re-open them, re-focus on the front sight, bring the pistol back...

I'm not there yet, but I have a feeling this will bite me in the *** when i start trying to do double-taps and the like.

sigfan91
04-21-2011, 4:19 PM
Close your eyes before you fire. Then open them after the shot. ;)

FeuerFrei
04-21-2011, 5:54 PM
Rapid mag dumps from your pistol would be a good start.
Ranges don't allow this most of the time. Need to find a legal quiet spot to let it rip. Get comfortable.
Make a war face. Squint hard and stare. Looks goofy but can also train your face to keep doing something that the mind thinks is productive
The eyes not the mouth!
http://www.gabrielglewis.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/full-metal-jacket-sergeant.jpg
Anticipating the coming noise and recoil causes your eyes to brace for impact.
If you can feel the concussion of the report then try goggles. I know it sounds silly but I have seen this work. Make sure you use ear muff type protection too.
Getting hit by brass can also cause the blinkin problem too.
You need to put mind over matter. Once you don't mind then it won't matter. ;)

G-forceJunkie
04-21-2011, 6:01 PM
Earplugs and muffs to start. They key, as mentioned, is follow through. Watch the front site. Where does it go? Does it rise straigh up? Curve up to the left or right? How high above the rear site does it go? Are you following it back down to proper sight alighnment and site picture. People think when the pistol discharges, its an explosion that you have no control over, you loose sight of everything, then have to find it again. This is only true if other factors (grip and such) is not optimum. A .44 mag is a different story, but we are talking about mid level semi auto pistols here. Focus on the front site, pay attention and learn where and why it is moving, and keep tracking it the whole time. With enough focus, you won't be blinking.

llamatrnr
04-21-2011, 6:07 PM
and if that doesn't work, I could stand next to you while shooting and rap you in the hand with a ruler whenever you blink while firing. I am sure, that will sove the problem quickly ;).

There you go! I'll bet Neil would even loan you one of his nun's habits for the occasion.:devil2:

Either/Or
04-21-2011, 6:58 PM
I find the rapid fire comment very interesting. I sometimes have this "blinking issue,"
Though I'm mostly rifle shooting, but I found that even firing at a slightly increased rate and I stopped blinking. This is just the range acceptable 2-3 seconds between shots instead of 10-15 seconds or so...

jumpthestack
04-21-2011, 9:13 PM
Focus on calling your shot.

Shoot at a distance such that you can't see the holes in the paper. When you shoot, focus hard on the front sight and as the shot breaks, note where the front sight was relative to the target. Due to unavoidable jitter, the front sight will be a little low or high or left or whatever. If you saw the front sight a little bit left on the target and the round went left, then that's ok. If you saw the front sight more or less on target but you are hitting low left, then you know you have trigger control issues.

The side effect of focusing on calling your shot is that it will help you keep your eyes open.

cali_armz
04-21-2011, 9:28 PM
Training classes were a good way to get started, but on the really niggling little details of shooting I've gotten more good advice from this forum's users then anywhere else... (and it's usually a post somebody makes as an afterthought just before the thread vanishes to the 2nd page...)

So, here's one more stupid newbie question: Any advice on not blinking every time the pistol fires? with .22/9mm it's not an issue, .40 is a little bit worse, but with anything bigger I have the damnedest time keeping my eyes open just as the pistol fires. I guess feeling the shock wave through my glasses is the trigger...

Any exercises, tricks, advice?

(and, for the record, thanks to the advice I've found here I'm putting all 10 rounds in a 4" circle at 25'... now I just need to get "my" 4" circle on top of the 4" circle printed on the target and I'll be golden. ;-)

Thanks, all.

maybe get better hearing protection?

what kind of do you use now?

other than that, id say practice more

NytWolf
04-21-2011, 9:38 PM
That blinking is flinching. It is a psychological game. You flinch more if you pay attention to the shot. Although it sounds ironic, if you anticipate the firing, you will flinch. Like all pros say, the trigger break should be a surprise to you ... in other words, do not anticipate the trigger break. The key is, like someone said earlier, practice, practice, practice.

In rifle shooting, when we start to flinch, we switch to a smaller caliber rifle and shoot until we don't flinch anymore. Then we switch back and keep practicing.

You can do the same with a handgun. Switch to a small caliber handgun, and shoot until you get used to it, then switch back and continue.

MontClaire
04-21-2011, 9:48 PM
dry fire at home to erase the shot anticipation. you shouldn't blink anyway. that's not right.

BigFatGuy
04-21-2011, 10:58 PM
maybe get better hearing protection?

what kind of do you use now?



Plugs and Howard Leight electronics muffs.

Practice it is!

cali_armz
04-22-2011, 12:09 AM
Plugs and Howard Leight electronics muffs.

Practice it is!

yea, sounds like you got some of the best hearing protection available. practice is likely the best thing to do from here.

besides, its always nice having another reason to go put rounds downrange!!

gatesbox
04-22-2011, 12:16 AM
I think lots of good advice here...for me, most of my anticipation reaction issues were solved with by two things.....first at the range I practice at least a few mags with very slow controlled trigger pull, squeeze slowly. Any change in sight picture or stability and I pause until I'm on target. Pause means keeping the pressure on the trigger....slowing everything down to the extreme always helps me.

Second, I love my ruger pistol with the laser grips...I focus so much on the red dot that follow through and flinching are easy to notice and work through.

Fishslayer
04-22-2011, 5:13 AM
I concentrate on the front sight, try to watch the muzzle flash and try to call the shot. Concentrating on all that can help if you have a flinch, too. You're not thinking about the gun going off.

Can't buy anything here
04-22-2011, 6:15 AM
You should also practice not blinking in case you get shot by having someone throw BBs at you....

BamBam-31
04-22-2011, 8:13 AM
Double up on hearing, and train more with a .22lr.

Barbarossa
04-22-2011, 8:21 AM
Two for flinching

chesterthehero
04-22-2011, 12:32 PM
great... i have no idea if i blink or not when shooting.. now im going to paying attention to that...

BamBam-31
04-22-2011, 12:39 PM
If it's a surprise break, you should still be visually tracking your sights in relation to your target ("calling your shot" when it breaks) and look it back onto your target during your follow through. If you saw all that happen, you didn't blink.

IPSICK
04-22-2011, 12:43 PM
Do you shoot with both eyes open?

If not, pressure from closing one eye to shoot may add to the stress to your other eye and necessitating the blink (besides the concussive blast from the round). One way to train yourself to shoot with both eyes open is to put scotch tape on your non-shooting eye's side of your safety glasses.

bussda
04-22-2011, 1:04 PM
If you are using ear muffs, switch to in ear protection. I found that safety glasses created a gap with over ear protection. In ear resulted in better results.

CALI SHOT DOC
04-22-2011, 4:33 PM
Double up on ear protection. Use both ear plugs and ear muffs to block the sound. When i'm training i listen to music under my ear muffs which helps block out the noise.

Realize that it's natural to blink when you have an "explosion" go off in your hand. Takes time to train yourself to accept it and get use to it.

VTX
04-22-2011, 5:02 PM
which end of the barrel are you on?

nrvnqsrxk
04-22-2011, 5:43 PM
Surprised I haven't heard anyone recommend actively looking for the ejected casing. You can blink after you see it fly to your right :)

jwkincal
04-22-2011, 5:49 PM
Took until post #24 until someone said it:

The discharge must be a surprise. You are anticipating if your eyes close long enough to come out of focus and off the sight picture.

Practice. Dry fire is supposed to help, not with the actual blink/flinch, but with the "roll-off" break.

The better eye/ear protection can't hurt. Neither can lots of live fire :)

The_Tinman
04-22-2011, 5:50 PM
I found going from .22LR and 9x19 up to .40 S&W easier by practicing skeet shooting with a 12 gauge shotgun. The movement staying ahead of the clays help to keep me focused and the proximity of the considerably louder shotgun rounds help condition me for shooting the more powerful cartridges I shoot now.

559luke
04-22-2011, 7:10 PM
its a big problem because he is not maintaining proper follow through.

What is follow through in the context of shooting. Makes sense on the golf course. What about the range?

bartt
04-22-2011, 7:38 PM
Training classes were a good way to get started, but on the really niggling little details of shooting I've gotten more good advice from this forum's users then anywhere else... (and it's usually a post somebody makes as an afterthought just before the thread vanishes to the 2nd page...)

So, here's one more stupid newbie question: Any advice on not blinking every time the pistol fires? with .22/9mm it's not an issue, .40 is a little bit worse, but with anything bigger I have the damnedest time keeping my eyes open just as the pistol fires. I guess feeling the shock wave through my glasses is the trigger...

Any exercises, tricks, advice?

(and, for the record, thanks to the advice I've found here I'm putting all 10 rounds in a 4" circle at 25'... now I just need to get "my" 4" circle on top of the 4" circle printed on the target and I'll be golden. ;-)

Thanks, all.
To stop blinking - concentrate on the front site, really hard. You want to do that anyway for accuracy's sake, but if you do it hard enough you'll find you don't blink. That's what works for me...:D

cv0lv0g0
04-22-2011, 7:52 PM
shoot 6 full power 44s then go back to a pea shooter it worked 4 me along time ago

Us3rName
04-22-2011, 9:33 PM
like what has been said above. don't anticipate your shot. Just squeeze it off.

also I think it could be a trama type thing. Maybe expose yourself to more "in your face" things. Like big mean fish in a fish tank, or fire crackers, snap caps, games. Just things that tend to make you jump back a bit. Normally its the "WTF?!" things that would do it.

I found that after being exposed to things that normally makes people jump, your senses becomes numb to it. Stand next to someone while their shooting and stare at the firearm.

You'll over come it eventually. Just keep shooting.