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mjlennon
04-08-2011, 7:27 PM
Can a Nikon monarch scope handle the 340 recoil with out a muzzle brake?

BigNick
04-08-2011, 7:56 PM
I have one on a tikka t3 300 wsm. It's working fine ATM. I have about 300 rounds down range so far, not a 340 but it's all I have.

bruce_ventura
04-09-2011, 9:24 AM
It'll handle the recoil better than you will!

I have a 340 wthby, sans muzzle brake. It's not a gun I would choose to shoot often because of the recoil. Shooting from a field position is fine (like 12 ga shotgun), but from a bench rest or prone is tough on the shoulder.

I know a little about this topic, I'm no expert. There are at least two distinct effects on a scope from recoil. One is the effect of high frequency acceleration on internal mechanisms. I've measured accelerations of 5,000 -10,000 Gs at the scope on a variety of centerfire rifles. The main effect of this is brinnelling on mating mechanical surfaces, which increases friction and makes movements seem rough. This type of wear can cause real problems with reticle adjustment mechanisms (shifting zeros, stuck reticles, etc.). Occasionally this acceleration can cause poorly mounted optics weak mechanical components to fail.

The second is the overall force (impulse) on the scope as the rifle accelerates backward. Poorly designed mechanical components can become distorted, leading to loose mechanisms. Inadequate scope mounts can stress the scope tube.

The damage accumulates with the number of shots. Magnum caliber rifles cause a longer duration vibration with somewhat higher peak acceleration, so the effects of shock are observed after fewer shots.

The shock from 340 wthby rifle will be hard on any scope. The Monarch scope line is designed to handle high recoil, so it will survive longer. Paying more is no guarantee that the scope will handle recoil better. If you plan to shoot the rifle a lot (>1,000 shots), I recommend you buy a scope with a lifetime, no hassle replacement warranty. Always use high quality steel scope mounts and lap the rings.

Alexa79
04-21-2011, 11:08 PM
It'll handle the recoil better than you will!

I have a 340 wthby, sans muzzle brake. It's not a gun I would choose to shoot often because of the recoil. Shooting from a field position is fine (like 12 ga shotgun), but from a bench rest or prone is tough on the shoulder.

I know a little about this topic, I'm no expert. There are at least two distinct effects on a scope from recoil. One is the effect of high frequency acceleration on internal mechanisms. I've measured accelerations of 5,000 -10,000 Gs at the scope on a variety of centerfire rifles. The main effect of this is brinnelling on mating mechanical surfaces, which increases friction and makes movements seem rough. This type of wear can cause real problems with reticle adjustment mechanisms (shifting zeros, stuck reticles, etc.). Occasionally this acceleration can cause poorly mounted optics weak mechanical components to fail.

The second is the overall force (impulse) on the scope as the rifle accelerates backward. Poorly designed mechanical components can become distorted, leading to loose mechanisms. Inadequate scope mounts can stress the scope tube.

The damage accumulates with the number of shots. Magnum caliber rifles cause a longer duration vibration with somewhat higher peak acceleration, so the effects of shock are observed after fewer shots.

The shock from 340 wthby rifle will be hard on any scope. The Monarch scope line is designed to handle high recoil, so it will survive longer. Paying more is no guarantee that the scope will handle recoil better. If you plan to shoot the rifle a lot (>1,000 shots), I recommend you buy a scope with a lifetime, no hassle replacement warranty. Always use high quality steel scope mounts and lap the rings.
What does it mean "lap the rings"