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jojojones
10-26-2006, 7:14 PM
It is my understanding that Remington 870, winchester mod 12's, ithica mod 37's and mossbergs were all used during vietnam. I have some picks of all but the mossberg. I have found a cheap old mossberg for sale and was thinking of building it as a retro gun to look like a vietnam era shotgun. I was wondering if anyone has pictures of any mossbergs used in that time, or any info at all. I did a basic google search but found little except some poor rez viseo game pics.


Thanks for the help,




Jojo

grammaton76
10-26-2006, 7:17 PM
Mossberg M590, http://world.guns.ru/shotgun/sh04-e.htm

I think to Vietnam-ize it, all you'd have to do is add an optional bayonet. :)

Mssr. Eleganté
10-26-2006, 8:39 PM
I've never heard of Mossbergs being used in Vietnam, but if they were it would the Model 500 and not the 590. I thought the military didn't buy Mossbergs until the late 1970's or early 1980's.

A Google search for "Mossberg" and "Vietnam" only brings up mention of the videogame "Battlefield Vietnam", which are probably the images you found.

But you always see pictures or hear first hand stories of troops using weapons that they shouldn't have really had, so who knows? The military did buy civilian shotguns for troops to use for recreational sporting use.

Heck, cut the barrel down to 18 inches, put a wood stock on it and parkerize the metal and it will look like a Vietnam era Mossberg even if they didn't exist. :p

Patriot
10-26-2006, 8:53 PM
I've heard of Winchester 1xxxs and Ithacas being used in Vietnam, but that's all 2nd hand. A book I have says Savage pump-actions were also used.

Mssr. Eleganté
10-26-2006, 9:12 PM
A book I have says Savage pump-actions were also used.

I think Savage-Stevens Model 620's were used. Back when I was shopping online for Stevens shotguns, US proofed Model 620's used to always come up, with the seller mentioning that they were Vietnam era.

http://www.colt45s.com/188.jpg

Timberland
10-26-2006, 9:46 PM
500 were used in vietnam, they were introduced in the early 60s. That one on the link is the current army shotgun. I have a nam era mossy not a military model, but it is the nicest mossy youll ever see. Mossbergs are cool cheap guns.

jojojones
10-27-2006, 10:01 AM
It was my understanding, from some reading that the military hadn't truly standardized the shotgun for use since like WWII, so it was whatever they could get there hands on, i.e. the stevens, ithicas, winchesters, and whatever else was out there.

It has a wood stack and fore end and I was planning on chopping the barrel to 18" and teh putiing a heat shield on the parking the entire thing...figured that would make it look vintage enough. Does anyone know if you can order the bayonet luck mag clamp from mossberg? I think it is f'in hilarious to have a bayonet on a shotgun. Plus the 870's had them in vietnam so I figure the mossy's did too.


Thanks,




Jojo

lazyman
11-01-2006, 12:16 PM
don't forget the fully automatic remington 7188. that was a bad boy gun :D

rorschach
11-03-2006, 6:50 PM
In "One More Mission" then-Lieutenant Oliver "Blue" North writes of carrying a USGI Winchester M12 shotgun through the jungles of Vietnam, I dont remember all the details, but I remember it jammed on him when "Blue" (and the shotgun) got hit by shrapnel, and a piece had wedged itself between the tube and the action bar

In his book "Pointman" Navy SEAL Chief James "Patches" Watson carried a pistol gripped Ithaca M37 in 'Nam. It was specially fitted by Navy armorers with an extended magtube and a special "duckbill" muzzle attachment, which spread buckshot in a horizontal pattern. Although limited in range, coupled with #4 Buck, and the Ithaca's slamfire capability, this configuration was no doubt a devestating anti-personnel weapon. Ithaca later offered pistol grips and 8-shot mag tubes from the factory. I read that Chief Watson was questioned by some pencil pushing brass for using this shotgun/ammo setup as it was deemed illegal by the Geneva Convention to which he replied "This ain't Geneva!"

Some SEALs were issued full-auto Remingon 1100's but they werent as reliable as pumpguns, and slow to reload.

anotherone
11-04-2006, 12:43 AM
Mossbergs are cool cheap guns.

There are many Mossberg shotguns tucked away in various truck cabs across the state :).

pacificamark
11-04-2006, 8:41 AM
Here's a duckbill attachment for those Ithacas:

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid101/p82fbfdec06bed254da112e885a8a3eb4/f9cf0bb4.jpg

dw1784
11-04-2006, 3:58 PM
In his book "Pointman" Navy SEAL Chief James "Patches" Watson carried a pistol gripped Ithaca M37 in 'Nam. It was specially fitted by Navy armorers with an extended magtube and a special "duckbill" muzzle attachment, which spread buckshot in a horizontal pattern. Although limited in range, coupled with #4 Buck, and the Ithaca's slamfire capability, this configuration was no doubt a devestating anti-personnel weapon. Ithaca later offered pistol grips and 8-shot mag tubes from the factory. I read that Chief Watson was questioned by some pencil pushing brass for using this shotgun/ammo setup as it was deemed illegal by the Geneva Convention to which he replied "This ain't Geneva!"

Some SEALs were issued full-auto Remingon 1100's but they werent as reliable as pumpguns, and slow to reload.

hey I got an autographed copy of that book(and his other book, Walking Point)!! My friend Bob, who was a UDT, took my copy to a vet function to have it signed!!

Watson's shotgun, "Sweetheart" was modified at Frankford Arsenal in 68, with the saw-ed off grip made by Watson himself. It was "cobbled" together with scrap barrel pieces at Frankford. Almost all Navy SEAL shotguns were Ithaca 37's without disconnectors. Bob said there were Stevens because during the 20 and 30's, that's what they had, Ithacas and Stevens.

Though the Ithaca's were capable of slamfire, SEALs weren't trained in using it that way. It was considered as a waste of ammo and not being able to hit accurately.

In the book, Watson was confronted by an airforce colonel. Watson told him the shotgun is not against the Geneva convention, only soft lead bullet such as old style buckshots were. He says: "Colonel, if they ever send me to Geneva, I'll leave her at home. But between now and then, she and I just don't part company".