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View Full Version : What is the proper way to lap scope rings?


keninsb
03-02-2011, 5:22 PM
First of all, I want to apologize in advance, this is my first post on this site (I am a rookie member) and am sure this has probably been posted before. I did a quick search, but could not find any threads that answered my questions. So if this subject has been convered to death or if I posted in the wrong forum I sincerely apologize.
That being said, I have a Remington 700VTR .308 that I am converting to a tacticlal rifle. I have purchased some good Leupold PRW Perma Rings and a Precision Reflex Mount. I have done a TON of research of scope lapping and think I have a grasp on how to proceed but still have a couple of questions.
I have a scope lapping kit from Russ Hayden's Shooter's Supply (http://www.shooters-supply.com/web_specials.html). The directions on the lapping tool advise you to lap only the bottom rings, while Midway (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWv7SiBheV0) advises to install the upper rings and lap the upper and lower rings at the same time. It seems like lapping both upper and lower rings makes more sense (even though it looked like the Midway video looked like they took too much material off the rings). I mean the more contact, the better right?
I am tempted to do the uppers and lowers but take off about 75%. Does that sound like a good approach?
On another subject, I was wondering if it is a good idea to LocTite the front and rear trigger guard screws. I am assuming that it is but just wanted to run it by everyone.
Sorry for the stupid questions. Any help is greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Ken (calguns rookie)

bridgeport
03-03-2011, 5:24 AM
Hi Ken, your question is valid, let me help you with it.
The reason you only need to lap the lower rings, is that that is the anchor, or solid point of alignment. The upper rings then "sit" on the lower rings and normally have enough play to align themselves as they sit on the lower rings.... get what I'm saying?
Most new rings these days are very well made and will require just a wee bit of lapping and this is really to "perfect" the fit. My advice is worry less. Do the install. and go shootin.

Fjold
03-03-2011, 5:52 AM
75% contact with the lower rings is the most that I would recommend. You risk oversizing the rings and making them too loose to hold the scope. I always take a light lap on the upper rings just to remove any high spots that could scratch the scope.

keninsb
03-03-2011, 9:30 AM
Thanks for the help guys, I REALLY appreciate it. The lapping process makes much more sense to me now.
Thanks again,
Ken

bridgeport
03-03-2011, 2:21 PM
Ken, when you lapp, the coloring on your rings will wear away revealing the amount of contact you are getting. Fjold is right, go easy, and I also touch the caps just to even out any roughness. If you feel the need to confirm the wear pattern you can always recolor them using a felt tip marker. Just food for thought.

keninsb
03-03-2011, 2:43 PM
Thanks again Bridgeport, I really appreciate the help. I have got the idea now and feel pretty confident about proceeding.
Any thoughts on the trigger guard screws? The manual has the torque specs, but does not mention Loctite. Do you think it is a good idea to put a dab of Loctite on those screws?
Thanks again for the help.
Ken

Fjold
03-03-2011, 4:10 PM
You can put a small dab of releasable lock tight on them if you want but I don't bother even on my hard recoiling rifles.

keninsb
03-03-2011, 4:32 PM
You can put a small dab of releasable lock tight on them if you want but I don't bother even on my hard recoiling rifles.

Thanks Frank.
Man, I have spent so much time working on this rifle (changed the stock, installed a detachable magazine kit, Jewell trigger, lapped the bolt lugs (VERY lightly) and am now going to install the scope) and have still not fired a round trough it yet! It has been kind of a hobby for me, I enjoy learning about the rifle and doing the work. Too bad the range is 40 minutes away! It's tough being a firearms enthusiast in CA.
Thanks again, can't wait to get the scope installed!

Ken

bridgeport
03-03-2011, 7:05 PM
Satisfaction and developing an understanding of the mechanics of the beast. That is what its about. Study up on it, and you will or may already have found, that this can be taken to extremes. Guys have devoted their lives to building the perfect rifle.

keninsb
03-03-2011, 7:52 PM
Satisfaction and developing an understanding of the mechanics of the beast. That is what its about. Study up on it, and you will or may already have found, that this can be taken to extremes. Guys have devoted their lives to building the perfect rifle.

I completely understand. I have done LOTS of research on the web looking at different upgrades and modifications. I am turning my 700VTR into a tactical rifle and keep finding fun things to do. I am not going to take it to the extreme, but would like to build a nice rifle that I can shoot out to 300yds or so with descent accuracy. I am not going to blue print the receiver or anything like that (now if money was no object:rolleyes:) but would like a nice descent looking rifle that shoots well. Here is what I have into it so far:

Bell & Carlson Tactical Medalist A-5 Stock
Wyatt's Tactical Detachable Magazine Kit
Jewell HVRTSBR SS Trigger
Callahan Speedlock firing Pin Assembly
Precision Reflex Scop Base
Leupold PRW Rings
Bushnell Elite 6500 4.5X30X50 Tactical Scope (I know, but they were rated really well and I got it for $600 shipped, couldn't pass it up)
Harris Bi-Pod
The next "mod" is a Callahan tactical bolt knob that i am going to install.
I think that is it (for now):o

Ken

bridgeport
03-04-2011, 5:36 AM
Nice. That should work well beyond 300 yds. No worries on the glass. Optics add significant cost to a build, You have to go with what works for you. I dont know if you hand load, but if you do not... that is a great way to enhance accuracy and save a few bucks. Also, hand loading gives the shooter a means to both extend the time you spend with the sport and opens up an array of different cartridges that would otherwise be
unusable in a practical sense. Just food for thought.

keninsb
03-04-2011, 8:29 AM
Nice. That should work well beyond 300 yds. No worries on the glass. Optics add significant cost to a build, You have to go with what works for you. I dont know if you hand load, but if you do not... that is a great way to enhance accuracy and save a few bucks. Also, hand loading gives the shooter a means to both extend the time you spend with the sport and opens up an array of different cartridges that would otherwise be
unusable in a practical sense. Just food for thought.

Thanks Bridgeport. I am looking forward to taking the 700 out to the range. I have heard a lot about reloading too, allthough I have not researched it. Is there an "art" to reloading or does practice make perfect? I heard that it is just as cheap to buy good ammo as it is to reload, is that true? What equipment is needed to reload? Cost? Again, sorry for all of the questions, but in all fairness... you started it:)
Thanks again,
Ken

emilio
03-04-2011, 8:54 AM
howdy, sounds like you're putting together a nice piece of gear.

note that screws with Loctite will change your torque specs, much like spark plugs with anti-seize (perhaps moreso from the smaller surface area). pretty much use a torque wrench to specs OR use Loctite to hand-tight.

- emilio

keninsb
03-04-2011, 8:59 AM
howdy, sounds like you're putting together a nice piece of gear.

note that screws with Loctite will change your torque specs, much like spark plugs with anti-seize (perhaps moreso from the smaller surface area). pretty much use a torque wrench to specs OR use Loctite to hand-tight.

- emilio

Thanks Emilio.
That brings up a really good point. My scope base and rings did not come with any torques specs. Any idea what the screws on the base and rings should be torqued to?
Thanks,
Ken

keninsb
03-04-2011, 10:02 AM
I did some searching on line and found two links that refer to scope base/ring torque. Here they are:
http://www.longrangehunting.com/forums/f37/scope-mounting-how-much-torque-screws-38709/

http://www.longrangehunting.com/forums/f37/torque-recomendations-29756/

From what I gather, the scope base screws should be about 30 in lbs, scope rings should be 10-15 in lbs for aluminum and 15-20 in lbs for steel.
Does this sound about right?
Thanks,
Ken

bridgeport
03-04-2011, 10:21 AM
Thanks Bridgeport. I am looking forward to taking the 700 out to the range. I have heard a lot about reloading too, allthough I have not researched it. Is there an "art" to reloading or does practice make perfect? I heard that it is just as cheap to buy good ammo as it is to reload, is that true? What equipment is needed to reload? Cost? Again, sorry for all of the questions, but in all fairness... you started it:)
Thanks again,
Ken

Reloading is so easy, that the biggest problem people have with it is not
starting, because they worry about it being difficult. Primer, Powder, bullet.
Press, dyes, powder measure, scale. A pair of calipers and a set of shoulder gauges can round out the simple kit required to load. The components are all widely available, and the tools are too, either new or used. A few hours of tutelage from someone knowledgable, or even reading a manual and just going for it you could teach yourself and ask questions here in the ammo forum. I am sure others will chime in with advice on this
but it is just to good a thing to not do it.

keninsb
03-04-2011, 11:29 AM
Reloading is so easy, that the biggest problem people have with it is not
starting, because they worry about it being difficult. Primer, Powder, bullet.
Press, dyes, powder measure, scale. A pair of calipers and a set of shoulder gauges can round out the simple kit required to load. The components are all widely available, and the tools are too, either new or used. A few hours of tutelage from someone knowledgable, or even reading a manual and just going for it you could teach yourself and ask questions here in the ammo forum. I am sure others will chime in with advice on this
but it is just to good a thing to not do it.

Thanks again Bridgeport. I will definitely look into that. I have read a lot of posts where people load their own for better accuracy. Seems like a trial and error process, but once you get it dialed in it seems like it would be worth it.
Thanks again,

Ken