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View Full Version : Anybody shoot at Richmond Rod and Gun?


M. Sage
09-26-2006, 6:34 PM
A friend of mine just got a new toy, and we'll by trying out this weekend at RRG, so... I was wondering what their rules are like, since their web site seems a bit light on that info.

Do they allow free shooting, or only from benches?

Do they care if I bring steel-jacketed ammo? (Hope not, it's all I got, even my SP is steel-jacketed.)

Thanks!

metalhead357
09-26-2006, 7:07 PM
If NRA_HPS doesnt wander over to answer I'd PM him. I've shot there but only for competitions..... the rest of the range does look nice but I have no idea on thier seperate rules for them.

Metalhead

blkA4alb
09-26-2006, 7:16 PM
I try to shoot there once a week, and have been for 4 years. To my knowledge there are no ammo restrictions (besides tracers and incind. obviously.) They have never checked my ammo or anyones I know for a steel core. You can only shoot rimfire rifles on the 25 yard range though. On the 100 yard range there are a couple spaces to the right of the benches where you could shoot standing, though I've never seen any rules prohibiting it from the benches.

Hope that helps, theres a small chance I could get there around 2:45-3:15.

M. Sage
09-26-2006, 8:36 PM
Yep, that helps a lot, thanks!

Python2
09-27-2006, 1:06 PM
Yep, that helps a lot, thanks!

While there, shooting on a Saturday or Sunday and you wonder where the sound of double tap, triple tap or tap till one full mag. is emptied as fast as you can pull the trigger, thats where USPSA/IPSC and IDPA shooters are. If you want to do combat shooting or practical shooting as they call it a politically correct terminology, you are required to take an orientation class and understand the rules. Enjoy and shoot safe.

NRAhighpowershooter
09-27-2006, 3:59 PM
yup.. no FMJ or steel core restrictions at Richmond.. as for shooting other than from the benches.. I dunno.. on the public line I have only shot on the pistol line.......

M. Sage
09-27-2006, 6:03 PM
While there, shooting on a Saturday or Sunday and you wonder where the sound of double tap, triple tap or tap till one full mag. is emptied as fast as you can pull the trigger, thats where USPSA/IPSC and IDPA shooters are. If you want to do combat shooting or practical shooting as they call it a politically correct terminology, you are required to take an orientation class and understand the rules. Enjoy and shoot safe.

I'm used to hearing the sounds of rapid fire and steel getting knocked down at Chabot's ranges 4 & 5, and have even knocked some of it down myself.

Combat shooting is fun! (even when your "combat gun" is late-19th century technology. :P )

sargenv
09-28-2006, 10:26 AM
Actually, the safety orientation is reccomended but is not required to shoot on the IPSC range. If you show up after paying your range fee and come to bay 3 where there is usually a 10 yard firing line and talk to the range officer on duty. Usually they will ask if you've been there before and if not they will explain the rules of the range to you. If there are enough RO's on duty that day, there may be one that will orient you and give you the rules of the range and show you around. Our web site (which I help maintain) is for the most part about the IPSC range (www.richmondhotshots.com) and we have announcements about competitions and training courses as they become available. Generally practice is held every Sat from 9:30a - 1:30p. Those who come out have access to a stand and shoot range (Bay 3) and a practice stage (usually bay 4 but sometimes 1 depending on the schedule) .

As far as I know there are no ammo restrictions on the IPSC range other than no steel core ammo or shotshell steel shot on steel targets and no Shotgun slugs on steel targets. It is one of the few ranges that allows you to fire shotgun slugs on paper but usually it's only at the 10 yard line, so it would really only be useful for function firing. Generally bay 1, 2, and 5 are for off duty RO's to practice on. PM me if you have any other questions.. or the "mail to" link on the hotshots page comes to me directly.

Vince

Python2
09-30-2006, 8:04 AM
Actually, the safety orientation is reccomended but is not required to shoot on the IPSC range. If you show up after paying your range fee and come to bay 3 where there is usually a 10 yard firing line and talk to the range officer on duty. Usually they will ask if you've been there before and if not they will explain the rules of the range to you.
Vince

I am surprise to hear Hotshot do not require orientation to shoot IPSC at RR&GC. Sounds like Range Fee is more important than to engrain into someone who want to shoot practical the importance of knowing the rules specially safety rules. Explaining the rules in a few minutes before they allow you to shoot multiple even at the ten yard line in my opinion is an accident waiting to happen. I believe orientation should be mandatory rather than recommended. No wonder I've seen some shooters in the ten yard line that make me step back every now and then.

sargenv
09-30-2006, 9:40 AM
I am surprise to hear Hotshots do not require orientation to shoot IPSC at RR&GC. Sounds like Range Fee is more important than to engrain into someone who want to shoot practical the importance of knowing the rules specially safety rules. Explaining the rules in a few minutes before they allow you to shoot multiple even at the ten yard line in my opinion is an accident waiting to happen. I believe orientation should be mandatory rather than recommended. No wonder I've seen some shooters in the ten yard line that make me step back every now and then.

Like I said, we offer a practice every saturday for IPSC/IDPA style shooting drawing from a holster. There is always someone there that makes sure you are being safe on the line (many times other experienced shooters are on the line and will give advice). If you've never been to a practice, it's informal. You bring your gear, you go to the Firing line on bay 3. If I'm RO'ing I ask if the shooter has had any experience, and I go from there. I can't speak for the other 50 or so RO's but that is the general procedure. If you are being unsafe, you WILL be asked not to do that. It's not like a general firing line at the 25 yard line. There is usually at least 1 RO watching you as well as other regular shooters making sure everyone on the line is being safe. Many off duty RO's are there practing also. I think that if you actually came out to see what was going on rather than inferring your experience at other ranges to here, you'd be happily surprised at the level of safety mindednes. However, anything I say can be twisted to seem dangerous to anyone, that is simply not the case. What you think is based on what you have experienced at other places. If you want to see what it is like, I suggest you come out and take a look for yourself.

The main reason that we don't require orientation is because we get a large volume of experienced shooters coming through. Matt Burkett, a GM in USPSA is holding a class there this weekend. Should we make it mandatory that a GM, with years of experience on the world competition level, take our orientation class? There are lots of people at different levels that come through. We recommend to new people that if they are interested in competition that they take the orientation class. If you have already shot somewhere else at one of the area clubs (Chabot, Yolo, USI, Gridley(IDPA), Sacramento, etc) then we run over the basic rules and watch the new (to Richmond) shooter making sure they know what's going on.

We do take safety seriously despite what you may think goes on. I've not covered everything and have been general on this forum, but until you see what's going on, you can "believe" anything you like.

See ya at the range,

Vince

M. Sage
09-30-2006, 5:46 PM
Well, we had a great time on the 100 yard range. The ex-roommate got to see what shooting at "those real far" targets is like, and did really well for a first-time gun owner shooting iron sights.

Her CZ452 is VERY nice. I love the trigger, though the action could use a few more tens of thousands of rounds to loosen it up a bit. :P The sights are a lot better than my Marlin's irons were.

Everybody at the range seemed really friendly (shooters and staff), and didn't seem too distressed when I was taking my target down and realized I'd hit the wire (with the Mosin...), so they had to wait for me to fix the bottom wire.

They didn't seem to care that I was shooting standing at the benches, someone else was shooting prone at the other end of the range. Didn't see an RSO wandering, but the guys in the office seemed to be paying attention just fine. There didn't seem to be a lot of room between the benches for prone or kneeling shooting, it looked like the ends were your best bet.

Python2
10-02-2006, 12:24 PM
The main reason that we don't require orientation is because we get a large volume of experienced shooters coming through.

Experienced shooters is entirely different than experienced IPSC and IDPA, or ICORE shooter IMHO? I consider myself an experienced shooter, but I still had to take orientation class both with Hotshots and TASC. Sure, if you do not know Burkett, you can simply ask if he'd shot IPSC and he is good to go.
Maybe the 10 yrd line practice is OK, but what about the Stage Practice? Would you let a beginner go thru it without proper orientation and reading the rules?


I've not covered everything and have been general on this forum, but until you see what's going on, you can "believe" anything you like.

Vince

I have seen what is going on. I am a member of RR&GC and shoot IPSC & IDPA. My experience tells me, orientation class should be made mandatory for first time IPSC and IDPA shooter.

thmpr
10-02-2006, 1:17 PM
Anyone heading this sat?

blkA4alb
10-02-2006, 2:17 PM
Anyone heading this sat?
Possibly :cool: .

SecondAmendmentgirl
02-21-2008, 6:15 PM
I might check it out next month.

wooger
02-21-2008, 6:25 PM
Makes me feel like shooting rifle for a change!