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View Full Version : Ithaca M37 with extended mag tube


lazyman
09-11-2006, 3:02 PM
good shotgun? I have a Remington 870 and want to buy another 870 or an Ithaca M37. what do you guys think?

anotherone
09-11-2006, 3:11 PM
Why not get a Benelli SuperNova if you're looking for something else in a pump action?

Black_Talon
09-11-2006, 4:55 PM
good shotgun?

Great shotgun.

M37's are about as bullet-proof as it gets. All steel and walnut. No plastic. Less parts than an 870 and lighter, shorter and easier to maneuver. Super reliable as well.

Personally, I'm not a big fan of the 8-shot versions as they get a little nose-heavy, but that's a personal preference and YMMV. That said, I own two of them anyway. I <3 Model 37's ! :)

http://www.black-talon.org/RKBA/SG/M37_DSPS_SCSO_0800.jpg

http://www.black-talon.org/RKBA/SG/M37_DSPS_HC_0800.jpg

lazyman
09-11-2006, 5:17 PM
OMG!!! those picks make me drool. That's the one(top). O so beautiful. I'm sold, Ithaca M37. Black Talon, are those older models or new production ones? how much? you want to sell me the black one? :)

Black_Talon
09-13-2006, 4:54 PM
Black Talon, are those older models or new production ones? how much? you want to sell me the black one? :)

They're both vintage 1980.

Hadn't considered selling either of them, but email me and we can talk.

Where are you located?

rorschach
09-13-2006, 5:32 PM
You will not go wrong with an Ithaca M37. If its an older model with no trigger disconnect, you can hold the trigger down and pump, and it will fire off a round every time you cycle the action. In trained hands, it will fire off all 5 rounds of slugs or 00 Buck as fast as a Benelli.

M. Sage
09-13-2006, 5:42 PM
You will not go wrong with an Ithaca M37. If its an older model with no trigger disconnect, you can hold the trigger down and pump, and it will fire off a round every time you cycle the action. In trained hands, it will fire off all 5 rounds of slugs or 00 Buck as fast as a Benelli.

Even in only somewhat trained hands. :D Seen it done that way, and done it that way myself. It's tons of fun watching a semi-auto shooter lose a ROF-based bet. :D

Ithaca 37's are great shotguns. I need to find a replacement for mine sometime...

BPA
09-18-2006, 7:37 PM
You will not go wrong with an Ithaca M37. If its an older model with no trigger disconnect, you can hold the trigger down and pump, and it will fire off a round every time you cycle the action. In trained hands, it will fire off all 5 rounds of slugs or 00 Buck as fast as a Benelli.


How do you know if it has the trigger disconnect when looking at used ones in a store?

Black_Talon
09-19-2006, 2:28 PM
How do you know if it has the trigger disconnect when looking at used ones in a store?

1) MAKE SURE THE GUN IS UNLOADED!!!!!!

2) Close action, pull trigger,

3) Pump action open,

4) While continuing to pull the trigger, slowly close the action. One of three things will happen:



A) Hammer will remain cocked and trip just as the bolt is nearly closed. This is the so-called "slam-fire" trigger (that everyone seems to be so impressed with).

...or:

B) Hammer will remain cocked and will not fall, even though action is fully closed. Releasing the trigger will allow the hammer to reset and it will be ready to fire once the trigger is pulled again. This is the so-called "fire interrupter" or "disconnecter" trigger. These are relatively rare on M37's. This is the typical type of trigger found on most shotguns (and other repeating weapons).

...or:

C) Hammer will remain uncocked and will follow the bolt all the way closed. This is the post 1975 "Standard Trigger" (as Ithaca referred to it) and it will not fire this way. Holding the trigger down on this style of gun will leave you with the hammer down on a gun with a loaded round in the chamber. Your only option at this point is to cycle the action again (without holding the trigger back) which will eject your live round onto the ground but will cycle a new round into the chamber. At this point you will finally have a gun that's ready to fire.


Most people seem to like the "slam-fire" trigger, but personally, I prefer the "Interrupter" trigger on my M37's. I find it too easy to double-fire the slam-fire guns when I'm shooting the gun quickly. Not coordinated enough, I guess...

BPA
09-19-2006, 10:49 PM
Thanks for the info,very interesting.The slam fire trigger models were pre 75 for the most part ?

TKo_Productions
09-19-2006, 11:06 PM
A) Hammer will remain cocked and trip just as the bolt is nearly closed. This is the so-called "slam-fire" trigger (that everyone seems to be so impressed with).

Isn't that comparable to round going off "out of battery?"

sounds dangerous if the hammer is falling while the bolt isn't closed, don't you risk damage to the gun or yourself?

have you actually slamfired yours?

Black_Talon
09-20-2006, 4:50 PM
Thanks for the info,very interesting.The slam fire trigger models were pre 75 for the most part ?

Yes, almost all pre '75 models were slam-fire. There were some LE guns made with the interrupter triggers though.

Black_Talon
09-20-2006, 4:59 PM
Isn't that comparable to round going off "out of battery?"

sounds dangerous if the hammer is falling while the bolt isn't closed, don't you risk damage to the gun or yourself?

have you actually slamfired yours?

Well, the actual sequence is that the hammer will not trip until the action release pivots up as the bolt clears it. When the bolt is in that exact position it's just started moving upward into the locking recess in the receiver. So *technically* it's (barely) locked up, but it's really a timing thing. It doesn't take much wear, or some stacked tolerances for it to actually go off out of battery. For that reason, slam-firing these is never recommended by anyone who is familiar with how they actually work.

I (almost) never slam-fire mine deliberately, but as I noted above, it does happen occasionally when I'm firing the gun real fast. That (and the fact that anything other than the first shot is not going to hit your target) is why I prefer the interrupter type of M37 trigger.