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View Full Version : What would a registration process really give you?


mattmcg
08-26-2006, 8:37 PM
I'm reading all of these posts about registration events and I'm a bit confounded for what you really gain by having a registration occur? Today somebody complies with a fixed mag on an AR and they own a long gun. If the DOJ lists OLLs and you register, you now have an AW that offers the ability to use a detachable mag still limited to 10 rounds. Yes, the inconvenience of scissor loading an AR is a bit of a pain, but is the detachable mag really that important? Especially when it means that you will be registering with an entity with a proven desire to swipe all firearms from private citizens (and specifically give the DOJ the address of where to go to initiate a voluntary or involuntary confiscation of your AW).

I know, a naive question but sometimes it makes sense to ask the basic ones..... I'd like to hear what a couple others of you think about this. Perhaps I'm just missing something in the logic here?

It would be nice if the CA DOJ and legislators would just realize that law abiding citizens should have access to sporting firearms like the rest of the 49 states and understand that unlawful individuals won't care about the law and build their illegal weapons any way they want.

ocabj
08-26-2006, 8:41 PM
If the DOJ lists OLLs and you register, you now have an AW that offers the ability to use a detachable mag still limited to 10 rounds. Yes, the inconvenience of scissor loading an AR is a bit of a pain, but is the detachable mag really that important?

Well, if you don't have any assault weapons as defined by California, I guess this becomes an issue for you now.

Back in 2000, I had the option of registering or not registering and just 'hiding' it. I chose to stay legal and regiester. I'm sure a few people were and are paranoid about registration and didn't register rifles that they possessed and kept. While I do not like law, I follow it. I cannot call myself a law abiding firearms owner if I didn't register.

Mssr. Eleganté
08-26-2006, 9:11 PM
... I'm a bit confounded for what you really gain by having a registration occur? Today somebody complies with a fixed mag on an AR and they own a long gun. If the DOJ lists OLLs and you register, you now have an AW that offers the ability to use a detachable mag still limited to 10 rounds.

Many of us have lots of 20 and 30 round mags we bought before the ban and these would be perfectly legal to use if we could register our rifles as "AR-15 series" assault weapons.

And many folks just want their firearms to look and work as they were originally intended to.

Oh, and my AR's aren't "sporting firearms". They are "unorganized militia (www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode10/usc_sec_10_00000311----000-.html)" firearms. :D

bwiese
08-26-2006, 9:21 PM
.... that offers the ability to use a detachable mag still limited to 10 rounds.

Wherever did you get that idea?

The magazine is only limited to 10rds if you didn't have the hicap mags before 1/1/2000. There's no restriction on a reg'd AW itself.

In 1999, many, many of us bought hicap magazines for guns we didn't even own then. I myself bought hicap mags for guns I didn't even particularly like and thought I might likely never own.

In fact, many folks are using their OLL-based rifles with detachable mags, as they have no flash hiders, telestocks or pistol grips and use a legal alternative like the MonsterMan grip that allows an ordinary rifle grip on a regular A2 stock.

mattmcg
08-26-2006, 9:47 PM
Many of us have lots of 20 and 30 round mags we bought before the ban and these would be perfectly legal to use if we could register our rifles as "AR-15 series" assault weapons.

Ah yes, excellent point. I forgot about the high-cap mag grandfathering provisions prior to 200. Unfortunately some of us weren't as lucky to stock up on these items at that time..... :rolleyes:

blkA4alb
08-26-2006, 9:55 PM
This discussion brings me to another question about the registration process. Does registering an AW "guarantee" your right of continued ownership of the asset into the future?
No one can guarantee anything. There is no answer to your question. One would like to believe so however.

bwiese
08-26-2006, 10:30 PM
This discussion brings me to another question about the registration process. Does registering an AW "guarantee" your right of continued ownership of the asset into the future?

Hmm. One primary goal - in fact, true legislative intent - of the Roberti-Roos law, which is essentially unchanged in the subsequent 16-17 yrs since then is that existing owners would be able to keep their guns should they transition into AW status by external circumstances (court/DOJ action, additional add-on legislation, etc.)

In fact, were it not for this proviso, the original Roberti-Roos law would not have passed (it passed by only one vote, due to the above inclusion of ability to register/retain). There were strong property rights issues on both sides of the aisle and worry about the political outcome of seizures or mandatory surrender/render-safe actions. SB23 and other amendations to Roberti-Roos have not changed this, and are not really separate bodies of law: in fact, SB23 is dependent upon Roberti-Roos' existence, as it just patched in an additional generic definition.

However, the CA AW laws are a mixture of disdain, idiocy and antigun/ anti-gun-owner sentiment. They make these guns more difficult to handle without accidentally committing crines - whether by omission or commission. It's easier to have legal problems with a legal, registered AW than with other firearms. The penalties for violating AW-related strictures can be secure and are often felonies.

rollyourown
08-27-2006, 1:23 AM
[QUOTE=treelogger] Do you wish to become a criminal? /QUOTE]

Your kidding right? If you own a gun in this state you are already assumed to be a criminal by those in power. Don't kid yourself.

As for registration, there is no reason for any type of gun registration except for tracking and future confiscation of said firearms. Don't even compare registration of guns to registration of cars. Cars are registrered for taxation purposes. Every year you pay the state for the privilage to own a car, and it costs. Firearms ownership is a RIGHT, granted by the people to the people through the Constitution of the United States of America. You do not pay taxes every year to own your weapons, so there is no reason to register them. Only weak minded cowards volunteerarly register their firearms.

What happend to the backbone of the American citizen in this state? What the hell is wrong with you that you would choose to lay down and take it in the rear from people that are hell bent on enslaving you???:confused:

Paul1960
08-27-2006, 6:35 AM
Registration?

Not me. I shipped a DOZEN AR's out of state to various locations around the nation rather than to give the SOB's in Sacramento a reason to kick down my door at midnight. The progressive liberals are walking a fine line between a massive disarming of the whole population and a political up rising. They feed the emotional fears of their voters by allowing revolving door justice from pansy-assed judges and DA's willing to plea bargain charges down as fast as possible. The steady training of criminals, the "no victim" crime of drugs, and no true reform of the system means there will be a constant high level of crime in our liberal cities and those victims will always need a "concerned" liberal to come to their rescue for the mear cost of a vote and their freedom.

It's sick. Did you ever notice that we register firearm owners and child sexual predators? How long before we have to wear ankle transmitters? We're not allowed within 1000 feet of a school either with our firearms.

No free man shall be debarred the use of arms ... some old dead white guy said that. Until the United States Constitution once again applies to California there are alternatives like:

http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y215/paul1960/Weapons/RegisterdVoter.jpg

http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y215/paul1960/Weapons/TempestuousSeaofLiberty.jpg