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mindwip
01-23-2011, 11:53 PM
I would like to start hunting with bow and arrow and rifle but none of my friends hunt so I have never learned.

yea I know the basic grab rifle get permit/hunter safty course and go find the animal. But how do you cut it up to store the meat, track, places to go etc. how does one learn with no one to teach them?

I have no interest for hunting just for fun, but want to take the meat and sinew for my bows that I make

lumwilliam
01-24-2011, 12:02 AM
I would like to start hunting with bow and arrow and rifle but none of my friends hunt so I have never learned.

yea I know the basic grab rifle get permit/hunter safty course and go find the animal. But how do you cut it up to store the meat, track, places to go etc. how does one learn with no one to teach them?

I have no interest for hunting just for fun, but want to take the meat and sinew for my bows that I make

I am interested in this as well. I thought about taking my AR out onto national park land or blm land...I hear hi cap mags are legal there since they are outside California control, so I will bring my unassembled drum magazine and put it together at the campgrounds. I plan to dress in camo, but not the digital stuff used by the marines because I do not want to look like a poser.

I plan on opening up on anything that moves. Bump fire most likely to ensure good hits. I'll be sure to put a new battery in my red dot. I hear that dear run fast so getting a good sight picture will be key.

Oh and one other thing, I have heard that sometimes hit animals can run several hundred yards before falling dead and can be quite difficult to find. So I have picked up some incendiary rounds from Arizona that I will be using. I figure I can just follow the flames, or if the brush gets to thick, I can follow the smell of cooked meat.

Bigyates
01-24-2011, 12:44 AM
There is a lot of initial planning in preparing for a successful hunt. If you intend to hunt deer, you will need to apply for a tag for the area or state you wish to hunt in. Application dates are specific and just because you apply does not mean you will draw a tag. If you do draw you need gear to match the terrain and weather conditions you might encounter during your hunt. Hunting is just that ; a lot of glassing and searching for your intended animal. You will need a good set of binoculars and good set of broken in boots. There are many books available that will show you how to butcher your animal if you are able find and shoot one. I would highly recommend the use of a guide or outfitter on your first couple of hunts. You will learn more from a good outfitter on a single hunt than from a whole stack of books on hunting. Good luck. Statistically less that 5% of the shooting public hunts.

bob7122
01-24-2011, 12:58 AM
I am interested in this as well. I thought about taking my AR out onto national park land or blm land...I hear hi cap mags are legal there since they are outside California control, so I will bring my unassembled drum magazine and put it together at the campgrounds. I plan to dress in camo, but not the digital stuff used by the marines because I do not want to look like a poser.

I plan on opening up on anything that moves. Bump fire most likely to ensure good hits. I'll be sure to put a new battery in my red dot. I hear that dear run fast so getting a good sight picture will be key.

Oh and one other thing, I have heard that sometimes hit animals can run several hundred yards before falling dead and can be quite difficult to find. So I have picked up some incendiary rounds from Arizona that I will be using. I figure I can just follow the flames, or if the brush gets to thick, I can follow the smell of cooked meat.

haha great imitation of a mall ninja :shuriken::smilielol5::rofl2:

bob7122
01-24-2011, 1:04 AM
be prepared to do alot of walking to scout an area ahead of time. skinning is pretty easy but time consuming. skinning a rabbit and skinning a deer are two different things, for one a rabbits fur will come right off. remember to field dress it asap and get the temp of the animal down to save the meat. and butchering can be read in a book some terminology maybe different for example backstraps and loin are the same thing, and finding out how to cut the joint with minimal energy.

tony270
01-24-2011, 8:50 AM
First read all the books you can on hunting, the animal’s behavior, the CDFG/CFGC regulations, applicable county ordinances, how to find BLM and National Forest lands that are legal to hunt, and their regulations. Those are the two public agencies that we hunt the most, then Military Reservations and National Preserves and state lands. You also need to know how to handle firearms safely and accurately.

mindwip
01-24-2011, 12:55 PM
Thanks for all the tips. Never thought of getting a guide for a local hunt. I already hike and camp and have a pair of boots. From my rock climbing/camping and BS Military Explorer days i have all the gear i would need with the exception of really nice glass.

What books are good? There are so many? do you know of any?

tony270
01-24-2011, 2:39 PM
I canít recall any particular book, just go to the library and check out a few old/vintage how to books on rabbit hunting or whatever type of hunting you plan on doing and read them. Like I said, start off hunting small game and then progress to larger game, just like riding a motorcycle, start off small and work your way up.
One of the best ways to get information is to talk to old and wise hunters who are enthusiastic about hunting and started off at an early age, or a young hunter who has learned from an old and wise hunter.

taperxz
01-24-2011, 7:23 PM
I am interested in this as well. I thought about taking my AR out onto national park land or blm land...I hear hi cap mags are legal there since they are outside California control, so I will bring my unassembled drum magazine and put it together at the campgrounds. I plan to dress in camo, but not the digital stuff used by the marines because I do not want to look like a poser.

I plan on opening up on anything that moves. Bump fire most likely to ensure good hits. I'll be sure to put a new battery in my red dot. I hear that dear run fast so getting a good sight picture will be key.

Oh and one other thing, I have heard that sometimes hit animals can run several hundred yards before falling dead and can be quite difficult to find. So I have picked up some incendiary rounds from Arizona that I will be using. I figure I can just follow the flames, or if the brush gets to thick, I can follow the smell of cooked meat.

WHAT??? All california laws apply everywhere in CA!! Your AR MUST be legally configured anywhere in CA!! Do not think you make an AW because you are in FED. regulated property!! You can not hunt in a National Park!!!!!!!

You have a lot of reading to do before you go out and hunt!! Please don't ruin it for the rest of us because of your ignorance.

dodgerfan175
01-24-2011, 7:32 PM
First thing you have to do when you start hunting is open up your wallet, and be willing to keep it open.:D

winxp_man
01-24-2011, 7:49 PM
haha great imitation of a mall ninja :shuriken::smilielol5::rofl2:


TRUE TRUE hahahahahahahaha :rofl2:

clay32
01-24-2011, 8:07 PM
I plan on opening up on anything that moves. Bump fire most likely to ensure good hits.
So I have picked up some incendiary rounds from Arizona that I will be using. I figure I can just follow the flames, or if the brush gets to thick, I can follow the smell of cooked meat.

Three very important, yet overlooked, tips to a successful hunt. I try to follow these whenever possible and look forward to passing along these traditions down to my son. ;)

(In all seriousness, if you listen to the anti-s, they actually think this is what goes on while hunting. Scary stuff.)

Brd_Hntr
01-24-2011, 8:12 PM
Start by taking a hunter safety class. There are three online classes which allow a home study approach to the problem. This is followed up by a four hour class.
All these are free to study on, but two require a fee for an online certificate.
www.hunter-ed.com/ca/
homestudy.ihea.com/
www.huntercourse.com/usa/california/

Otherwise you need a traditional course which takes about 10 hours plus the exam time.

Class schedules and additional information:
http://www.dfg.ca.gov/huntered/index.aspx

After you have a license it might be worthwhile to hire a guide for a specific hunt. You can learn a tremendous amount from a day in the field with an experienced person.
California also offers advanced hunter education classes. These are a good place to connect with others interested in hunting. If you have any specific questions pm me and I'll try to assist. Field dressing and butchering of meat are very well covered in the big game advanced class. There are also several good dvds and books on the subject.

The use of sinew from harvested animals will require a little more research - I never made it past basic flintknapping myself, but search youtube for 'turkish archery sinew' and you can watch and learn quite a bit. Thanks - Mark

nbkvig2
01-24-2011, 8:34 PM
First thing you have to do when you start hunting is open up your wallet, and be willing to keep it open.:D

:iagree:

wjc
01-24-2011, 9:33 PM
First thing you have to do when you start hunting is open up your wallet, and be willing to keep it open.:D

You forgot the part about having to refill it often. :D

Interloper
01-24-2011, 9:47 PM
Books on hunting?
I'm sure there are many that deal with specific regions or game animals.
But you need to learn to think like a hunter. Get True at First Light and any collections of short stories by Hemingway. The Snows of Kilimanjaro is a good one.
Find To Ride, Shoot Straight, and Speak the Truth and Fireworks by Colonel Jeff Cooper. We could give you all kinds of advice on how to hunt but these gentlemen will teach you how to think like a hunter.
"We do not hunt to kill. We kill to have hunted."

GlockBlocker
01-24-2011, 10:12 PM
I've spent the last few months starting from scratch myself. Getting some maps which clearly outline the NF and BLM land helped focus me on my options. The forest service and BLM both have their own maps which you can get at ranger stations or blm offices.

mindwip
01-24-2011, 10:12 PM
Brd_Hntr: Thanks for the links, i did not know that the hunting safety class went into a lot of my questions and reading about the advanced hunting course sounds like it is worth it. I have a lot to go on now. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction.

I have already made 3 bows 30, 35, 43 pounds and on my 4th. None have broken yet, and already have a book on how to get and use the sinew from deer. Bowyers Bible rocks for all things bows and arrows, i have all 4 editions. I plan to make a traditional bow makers kit from a deer once i get better (years from now). I actually like making bows more then shooting.

Interlooper and glockbuster thanks, will look into the books and maps

tony270
01-25-2011, 3:11 AM
The folks at Bass Pro will tell you that many of the folks that take the
on-line part of the class and then attend the 4 hour class fail the test. It's best to take the all day class, especially if you are a new to hunting.


Books on hunting?
I'm sure there are many that deal with specific regions or game animals.
But you need to learn to think like a hunter. Get True at First Light and any collections of short stories by Hemingway. The Snows of Kilimanjaro is a good one.
Find To Ride, Shoot Straight, and Speak the Truth and Fireworks by Colonel Jeff Cooper. We could give you all kinds of advice on how to hunt but these gentlemen will teach you how to think like a hunter.
"We do not hunt to kill. We kill to have hunted."

Yeah, how toobooks on hunting. One can learn many aspects of hunting as well as trapping from them. Then combine the research and interviews to get a big picture on what's really going on, that's what helped me, mentors help a lot too.

rob1105
01-25-2011, 4:51 AM
if you have never hunted before a good idea is to hook up with an Outfitter. They will have all the gear and info you need to a successful hunt. Sure it might cost you a little to get going but you need to learn the ropes from someone who know what they are doing.

AndrewMendez
01-25-2011, 4:59 AM
bass pro shop off the 210 and 15 offers the class. You pay 20 bucks to reserve your spot, then you get a gift card for 20 bucks when you finish the class. I bought a nice orange hat. My class started at 9 sharp, we broke around 10, then 11, then had lunch from 12-1:30, and I think I was taking the test by 3. The course is not 10 hours long, its a breeze. I got 100% on the test...just think Nanny state, and you will be fine.

semperfidelis354
01-25-2011, 6:19 AM
hmmm wanted to go to bass pro soon, and I've wanted my hunting license...

tony270
01-25-2011, 6:30 AM
hmmm wanted to go to bass pro soon, and I've wanted my hunting license...

My future wingman took the class at Bass Pro this past Sunday. The test has 100 questions, nearly 60 students attended this particular class, and the class started at 9 am and ended after 5 pm. The instructor told the future wingman that 2 internet students failed the previous weekend.

devilinblack
01-25-2011, 6:57 AM
Depending on what part of OC you're in Grant Boys in Costa Mesa might be closer. They have the classes at least a couple Saturday's a month iirc. They list the dates on their website, same deal as Bass Pro, go in before hand to sign up and pay for the class and get your book, go back later for the class and test.

Chris M
01-25-2011, 7:14 AM
My brother and I were in this situation just a few years ago. Our father has always hunted, but never involved us. He lives 3,000 miles away, and knows nothing about hunting in CA.

So, we took the course together, bought some guns, camo, binoculars, and countless accessories over the past 4 years. All we've hunted so far are waterfowl and turkey. One of these years I'll give Pig & Deer hunting a try.

Pig hunting may be your best bet for starting off, though your chances for success are probably pretty low without a guide. You don't need a ton of gear. You don't need to apply for certain zones. "Pig Season" is all year round.

It's a bit late to get into waterfowl hunting, since this weekend will close the season...BUT, a lot of places will start discounting their waterfowl gear, so you may be able to get some good deals for next season, and it'll give you plenty of time to gather information.

Be warned that waterfowl hunting can get VERY VERY expensive. First there are the calls & decoys (not only buying them, but learning how to use them) - Mallard, Pintail, Canada Goose, Snow Goose, Speckle Belly, Teal, Wood Duck,..... and eventually you may be looking for a hunting dog, a boat, a duck hunting club, etc.

Of course, it doesn't have to be expensive. I can hunt locally (Alviso) for free, and with very little equipment by hiking or even biking in on a Levee with only my gun, a box of ammo, a couple calls, and a fishing rod with some kind of grapple that can be casted out - for retrieving your ducks that fall in the pond, if you don't have a dog. The downside is you're shooting ducks that have been hanging out at the Sunnyvale water treatment plant. :puke:

If you give us an idea of exactly what game you'd like to target, I'm sure plenty of us will be willing to offer up our collective knowledge (but not any of our 'secret spots', of course. :D )

Probably the 2 best things you can do are read the regulations to find out where, when, how, and what you can hunt, and get out there and scout. Spend some time hiking around in the wilderness looking for signs of life - game trails, tracks, poop (scat), watering holes, bedding areas, etc.

Starting this year, it looks like there will be 2 "Free Hunt Days", where no license will be necessary (look for the new regs around May or so) - but a licensed hunter will have to be present to ensure safety and all regulations are followed. Maybe either you can find a 'mentor', or if you get your license, you can try to convince one of your friends to take advantage of one of the free hunt days.

GlockBlocker
01-25-2011, 9:07 AM
The folks at Bass Pro will tell you that many of the folks that take the
on-line part of the class and then attend the 4 hour class fail the test. It's best to take the all day class, especially if you are a new to hunting.
Freddie, the instructor I had at bass pro shop in rancho, said the same thing at the beginning of the class. (i took the online version)

Then he countered himself by reading off test scores from the last online class, and everyone got 80 to high 90s with 1 100%... except for 2 Fs.

He said those 2 guys actually showed up 1/2 way through the class, with no online certificate, which he suspects they didn't even do the online version.

If you're decent at self study, the online version is fine.

AndrewMendez
01-26-2011, 3:29 AM
Freddie, the instructor I had at bass pro shop in rancho, said the same thing at the beginning of the class. (i took the online version)

Then he countered himself by reading off test scores from the last online class, and everyone got 80 to high 90s with 1 100%... except for 2 Fs.

He said those 2 guys actually showed up 1/2 way through the class, with no online certificate, which he suspects they didn't even do the online version.

If you're decent at self study, the online version is fine.

If it was the class on Jan 15th that he was talking about, the 100% was mine! Seriously!

tony270
01-26-2011, 6:24 AM
I was told that a minor got 100 that day; it was actually put like this "a kid scored 100% and I got 80.

professionalcoyotehunter
01-26-2011, 11:31 AM
Tag along with me sometime.

royTheRidgeback
01-26-2011, 12:25 PM
Does anybody know of any good guides or outfitters in the San Diego area? I'm trying to get started hunting and would like to participate in the upcoming turkey season this spring. Unforunately, I don't know any hunters well enough to ask them to take me out on a hunt.

mindwip
01-26-2011, 1:19 PM
I would rather take the full day class. On-line study is fine, but would rather take a full day since its not like i already know hunting and just need the cert.

PMs answered


professionalcoyotehunter: More then happy to!

Chris M: I figure Deer or birds. But like you start off with birds, but i dont have a shotgun. Just rifles for now. Planning to hunt with my M1 Garand or AR, my only rifles that can handle the job. Looking at getting a 1903A and could use that. Since i am not all on the up and up with which rifles are great to hunt with i was thinking any hunting rifle i wanted would be a lever gun as i have always wanted one and need an excuse to get one.

devilinblack: I live in Irvine, so Grants is close to me i will be calling them

TemporarilyIncognito, and a few others: Brass pro is far off far me. in fact i have never been there but have been wanting to go. My GF lives in that area so we may visit this weekend.

royTheRidgeback: dito

tony270
01-26-2011, 1:20 PM
Does anybody know of any good guides or outfitters in the San Diego area? I'm trying to get started hunting and would like to participate in the upcoming turkey season this spring. Unforunately, I don't know any hunters well enough to ask them to take me out on a hunt.

http://www.dfg.ca.gov/licensing/specialpermits/specialpermits.html#

SAN
DIEGO SAN DIEGO SPORTSMANS CLUB 9935 VIA DE ORO, SPRING VALLEY, CA 91977 (619) 729-4876 500 B