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Whiskey84
01-10-2011, 4:29 AM
Got a male Jack tonight. Cleaned him up and have him soaking in a cold saltwater bath until I get home in the morning.

I'm pretty pumped that I got through it ok. I was real deliberate and managed to barely nick the guts. Fortunately it was about 29 degrees so I couldn't smell anything :D

Note for next time: Short sleeves no matter how cold it is.

What were the first animals you guys cleaned?

Spyder
01-10-2011, 7:28 AM
Besides fish, and pheasant, dove, and quail, a pretty nice muley up in Oregon.

I've never eaten Jack before...let us know how it is!

If you're one of us who seems to get blood everywhere when cleaning stuff, get some of the elbow length rubber gloves. They work wonders. You'll get a bunch of flak from the guys at deer camp, but it's a million times easier to clean up afterwards, which means you're the first one to the ice chest!

professionalcoyotehunter
01-10-2011, 7:34 AM
Whitetails.

stphnman20
01-10-2011, 7:37 AM
I want to hunt some jacks. :(

Someone take me!

olhunter
01-10-2011, 9:07 AM
...get some of the elbow length rubber gloves. They work wonders.

Even better...

http://www.shopmedvet.com/product/shoulder-length-gloves-03x240x830mm-100-box/gloves-surgical-exam-handling

ElvenSoul
01-10-2011, 9:10 AM
Congrats! Next you will want to step up to bigger game.

00BuckShot
01-10-2011, 9:11 AM
Jacks area nasty to clean but once the job is done (and the saltwater bath is a must...good job) they don't taste too bad. I make a killer Jack Rabbit Chili.

Hogs are tough to clean out, skin and quarter. I went through two GOOD knives on my last one.

lewdogg21
01-10-2011, 11:09 AM
First deer I was around made me want to throw up. Of course I was suffering from the early stages of frostbite and hypothermia so I was already messed up.

To be honest the nastiest ones are pheasants and turkeys. Unless your deer/elk/pig is gutshot they don't stink horrible like upland birds. For whatever reason pheasants are stinky while ducks don't stink. Just my experience.

portegee
01-10-2011, 1:42 PM
First deer I was around made me want to throw up. Of course I was suffering from the early stages of frostbite and hypothermia so I was already messed up.

To be honest the nastiest ones are pheasants and turkeys. Unless your deer/elk/pig is gutshot they don't stink horrible like upland birds. For whatever reason pheasants are stinky while ducks don't stink. Just my experience.

I never thought pheasents were all that bad, when I first started hunting quail those would bother me but nothing really does anymore

taperxz
01-10-2011, 1:47 PM
First deer I was around made me want to throw up. Of course I was suffering from the early stages of frostbite and hypothermia so I was already messed up.

To be honest the nastiest ones are pheasants and turkeys. Unless your deer/elk/pig is gutshot they don't stink horrible like upland birds. For whatever reason pheasants are stinky while ducks don't stink. Just my experience.

+1 on the Turkeys are the worst!! I don't get it either cause there ain't much in em and they eat the same stuff as deer.

lewdogg21
01-10-2011, 4:12 PM
+1 on the Turkeys are the worst!! I don't get it either cause there ain't much in em and they eat the same stuff as deer.

Yeah its funny how bad they stink but when you do an elk or deer it's wham bam, gut pile it out no problem.

tankerman
01-10-2011, 4:20 PM
Hogs are tough to clean out, skin and quarter. I went through two GOOD knives on my last one.
Hogs are easy to clean.
http://inlinethumb44.webshots.com/47147/2184299290105137698S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2184299290105137698AjPfpl)

brassballs
01-10-2011, 4:24 PM
[QUOTE=
To be honest the nastiest ones are pheasants and turkeys. Unless your deer/elk/pig is gutshot they don't stink horrible like upland birds. For whatever reason pheasants are stinky while ducks don't stink. Just my experience.[/QUOTE]

Just for reference, keep the pheasant and turkey intestines, as there the best catfish and even bass bait i have ever used!

duckman1
01-10-2011, 4:39 PM
I wouldn't eat a jackrabbit. Seems to me I read some where they carried a couple of bad viruses and parasites that can be transmitted to people.

Shoot-it
01-10-2011, 4:42 PM
I just stick to cotton tail if I plan to eat wild rabbit.

21SF
01-11-2011, 10:34 AM
Just for reference, keep the pheasant and turkey intestines, as there the best catfish and even bass bait i have ever used!

Trout guts....i used to nail the big cats at sunset with trout guts at del valle.

Full Clip
01-11-2011, 10:52 AM
Roll that brined jackrabbit meat in egg wash and cornmeal (laced with black pepper, chile powder and cumin) and pan fry... works for me.

Interloper
01-11-2011, 12:47 PM
Whiskey84,
Today you are a man! Good job!

First thing I ever cleaned was a gray squirrel. The smell hit me just right and made me light headed. Had to sit down for a second. Hasn't been an issue since.
My BIL cracked me up one time though. He helped me swing a buck up onto the tailgate that had been in the sun awhile. This rank little fart came out of the wound and my bro puked so hard I couldn't believe it. Even when he had nothing left to give he just kept on heaving and gagging all bent over...lord it was hilarious. :D

I wouldn't eat a jackrabbit. Seems to me I read some where they carried a couple of bad viruses and parasites that can be transmitted to people.

Myxomatosis and Tularemia are pretty nasty. If the animal looks healthy it's probably not an issue but that's where the rubber gloves come in. Cook the meat thoroughly and wash your hands and there's little danger. I like to freeze all my wild game as insurance.
If there's wolves in the meat though forget it. I can't bring myself to eat them then. :ack2:

edwardm
01-11-2011, 2:41 PM
That's amazing!

As a little (6-7) kid, pheasant, doves, etc. did not bother me. The second my old man opened up a duck, I was gagging and puking (or nearly so). Rabbits aren't much bother, but lately I've noticed that quail from a particular area smell about as bad as pig innards.

These days it doesn't bother me. Go figure.

First deer I was around made me want to throw up. Of course I was suffering from the early stages of frostbite and hypothermia so I was already messed up.

To be honest the nastiest ones are pheasants and turkeys. Unless your deer/elk/pig is gutshot they don't stink horrible like upland birds. For whatever reason pheasants are stinky while ducks don't stink. Just my experience.

edwardm
01-11-2011, 2:47 PM
If it infects a jackrabbit, odds are it will infect a cottontail or varying hare (snowshoe hare, to some). The trick is to 1) not eat an animal that shows signs of disease, and even if it looks healthy, 2) properly cook it. That means getting your internal temps up to whatever the USDA calls out for a given critter, for the specified period of time.

The cottontail stew I had this past fall was good. Very mild (hindquarters and backstraps were all I could use, really). Jackrabbit I've never been able to make taste decent. But cottontails. Next time I'm going to try making cottontail curry!

I wouldn't eat a jackrabbit. Seems to me I read some where they carried a couple of bad viruses and parasites that can be transmitted to people.

edwardm
01-11-2011, 2:49 PM
Myxomatosis and Tularemia are pretty nasty. If the animal looks healthy it's probably not an issue but that's where the rubber gloves come in. Cook the meat thoroughly and wash your hands and there's little danger. I like to freeze all my wild game as insurance.
If there's wolves in the meat though forget it. I can't bring myself to eat them then. :ack2:

Not rabbit-specific, but keep in mind that generally freezing meat won't necessarily kill all the bad stuff in it. An example is trichinella in pork. Freezing *can* kill it, but you have to get it to a certain temperature below 0C, and hold it there reliably for a certain period of time (the numbers escape me right now). Or, just cook the livin' heck out of it. That's why I boil my wild pork in onions, water and beer before I grill it.

Interloper
01-11-2011, 4:22 PM
Not rabbit-specific, but keep in mind that generally freezing meat won't necessarily kill all the bad stuff in it. An example is trichinella in pork. Freezing *can* kill it, but you have to get it to a certain temperature below 0C, and hold it there reliably for a certain period of time (the numbers escape me right now). Or, just cook the livin' heck out of it. That's why I boil my wild pork in onions, water and beer before I grill it.

Yeah you are right about that. The guidelines are crazy...like -20 C for 48 hours or something like that. Obviously your average household freezer never comes close to that. For me it's placebo against germaphobia but I do cook things thoroughly all the same...except my venison. I gotta eat that rare.

woodsman
01-11-2011, 6:41 PM
Yum, fried Jack and taters.

Been a while.

elevated
01-11-2011, 7:20 PM
first thing I cleaned was a cottontail about 3 months ago. I got the tinyest bit of the intestine matter on my finger and had to smell it. You know how you look at something and you just have to smell it? that's me, made me gag a little but I was proud after I did it. That was the first thing I've ever killed and ate. Since then I've shot 2 quail, 2 chukar and 2 pheasants. The chukar and pheasant were at Antelope Valley Sports Man's Club. I have to say the quail and pheasant have a very distinct smell, not bad but very earthy. I'm honestly a little scared about something like a pig or my first deer, still can't wait to do it though.

Spelunker
01-12-2011, 2:49 PM
You need to freeze hog meat in a sub-zero for 3 days or a regular house freezer for 7 days. I usually brine the meat in a cooler for 3 days then vacuum pack and freeze. Brine consists of salt, vinegar, ice and water. Too much vinegar can give it an odd looking green color.

Chris M
01-14-2011, 11:04 AM
First thing I ever killed and cleaned was a bluegill when I was probably about 5 or 6 years old.

Besides fish, it was a turkey that I shot a couple years ago. That thing sure did stink. I had the dry-heaves a little bit.

1911ShooterPhil
01-15-2011, 1:05 AM
A 311-lb wild boar in Georgia in 2008. Never had to dress and clean one by myself until then. It's hard, messy, stinky work. I had a hell of a lot more respect for hunting guides and outfitters after that. But, all said and done, after "low & slow" cooking for a day, plus a family friend's "secret" Cajun Barbecue Pulled Pork recipe, it was all worth it. Really makes you appreciate the whole hunting experience more when you hunt down the game, you dress it out, and then you make something delicious out of it. Just my thoughts. Stay frosty people.

polojeff
01-15-2011, 3:41 PM
First clean was an Ibex. Smelled horrific but was an easy job once I started