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SwissFluCase
01-10-2011, 12:50 AM
I have searched, but cannot find...

In some counties (Marin County comes to mind) the current policy is for the Sheriff to contact members of your family during the background investigation. The problem I (and many others) have is in the case where one's immediate family has been disowned, and there has been no contact for an extended period of time (say, over 10 - 20+ years).

What will be the standard for this going forward? Is this a requirement that will be dropped as counties are being brought into line with the law, or will this be a continuing issue? This seems unduly burdensome for a right that should only be evaluated based on a record of criminal or dangerous behavior.

I know for a fact that I am not the only one who has disowned their family and sees an issue here. As a matter of fact, this could affect anyone who has an anti gun family for that matter.

Regards,


SwissFluCase

dantodd
01-10-2011, 1:00 AM
If it were me I would not divulge the names and contact info for my family in your situation. I would say that I have no immediate family.

wildhawker
01-10-2011, 1:07 AM
Background checks will become far more administrative as the core right is secured (e.g., shall-issue upon being found not-prohibited), the process becomes consistent with other permitted rights, and fees are brought into line with actual costs (and "reasonable" so as to not unduly burden the right).

Window_Seat
01-10-2011, 1:07 AM
From Billy Jack's Blog:What CCW will look like if a court defines Good Cause as 'Self' Defense'

2010-09-28 1846

I realize there are some out there that want unfettered CCW issuance on demand in California. Ain't going to happen, if you will excuse my speech pattern.

Here are the requirements that you can expect most departments to set. Most of these are already discretionary to some extent but you can expect them to become mandatory.

1. 16 hours Firearm Training for all initial applications. (Currently minimum is 4 to 16 hours maximum).

2. Mandatory Psychological testing for all initial appplications. (Currently discretionary)

3. Face to face interview with department personnel. (Currrently some departments are doing phone interviews)

4. Character letters from non family members.

5. Inspection of all CCW weapons by department Range Master.

6. Qualification at department range with all CCW carry weapons.

I know this will not sit well with those who want them on demand and who have not read the SCOTUS decision in McDonald. These are not draconian and they will stand a court challenge as they simply establish resonable criteria for carrying concealed and do not violate your 2nd Amendment Right to possess. Possessing is one thing, while carrying concealed is a public safety issue.

Billy Jack
Tea Party Patriot & Son of Liberty

And what you can (and should) believe from the brain trust of CGF:

I'm not sure whether BillyJack is still banned but I do know that his blog doesn't seem to accept comments so I'm going to repost his post here and comment.



Let's go through one by one.

1. There is no minimum. I'm sure SFSO will require 16 or even 24 hours via a community college per the Penal Code.

2. The rub on psych testing is that the licensing authority is required to match parity with its own employees. Per the PC, "If psychological testing on the initial application is required by the licensing authority, the license applicant shall be referred to a licensed psychologist used by the licensing authority for the psychological testing of its own employees."

3. The face to face requirement will last a couple of weeks until the tidal wave inundates the process. If the process remains slow, the CGF litigation team will have fun with the county's treasury.

4. I'm sorry, that's a violation of the Penal Code. "Reference letters" would be a prohibited type of "no requirement ... may be imposed by any licensing authority as a condition of the application for a license." See PC 12054(d).

5 & 6. See 4 for - at worst - an amusing pucker by County Counsel. Either way, CGF will have fun getting County Counsel to explain how they could require marching inspection for a parade permit under either intermediate or strict scrutiny...

Wasn't it Billy Jack who said that when law enforcement doesn't follow the law...?

-Gene

Not to worry. :cool:

Erik.

Untamed1972
01-10-2011, 9:13 AM
I have searched, but cannot find...

In some counties (Marin County comes to mind) the current policy is for the Sheriff to contact members of your family during the background investigation. The problem I (and many others) have is in the case where one's immediate family has been disowned, and there has been no contact for an extended period of time (say, over 10 - 20+ years).

What will be the standard for this going forward? Is this a requirement that will be dropped as counties are being brought into line with the law, or will this be a continuing issue? This seems unduly burdensome for a right that should only be evaluated based on a record of criminal or dangerous behavior.

I know for a fact that I am not the only one who has disowned their family and sees an issue here. As a matter of fact, this could affect anyone who has an anti gun family for that matter.

Regards,


SwissFluCase


You could simply state that you have had no contact with certain members of your family for an extended period of time and have no contact information for them.

And also just stick what's on the standard DOJ app form. If there is no place for specfically listing family members, then dont supply them.