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eta34
01-03-2011, 10:37 AM
I currently have a Dell Dimension 3100. It has become slow over the last couple of years. I looked online and can upgrade to 2 gigs of memory for 40 bucks. It currently has 512 kb.

The pc has two internal slots currently occupied.by the dual 256 cards. I have no.other slots. When replacing those cards, will I lose anything on my hard drive?

I hope this all made sense.

sepiid
01-03-2011, 10:55 AM
no, you will nhot lose anything on the hard drive.

when you receive the memory just shutdown and unplug the computer from power

open the case and touch any metal portion of the case to release static electricity.

remove the old memory

open the new memory and compare to old to make sure it has the slot in the same spot

install new memory

close case

plug in

power on

JDay
01-03-2011, 12:21 PM
You're probably much better off just replacing that system, adding RAM is not going to do much to speed up a 3+ year old machine. More likely than not it is infected with adware/spyware. Running something like Malwarebytes on it should take care of that. In any case, if you upgrade the RAM make sure that you get the right type (DDR2 400mhz) for that machine.

UltraLNW
01-03-2011, 1:46 PM
Check this out - brand new Dell Vostro 230 Mini desktop w/ Intel E5700, Windows 7, 2gb DDR3, etc etc, with 17" LCD for $339.

http://configure.us.dell.com/dellstore/config.aspx?oc=bv1cs3x3&cs=04&dgvcode=ss&c=US&l=EN&dgc=BF&cid=27740&lid=1567911&acd=10853442-404255-173973

E Pluribus Unum
01-03-2011, 1:52 PM
You would probably be better off replacing the system.

I charge a flat rate $100 to copy customer data off the drive, format and reinstall the OS, and then copy the data back on. That is dirt cheap, but it has to be because I can't charge more due to the fact that the client could buy a new computer for not much more.

IrishPirate
01-03-2011, 1:57 PM
ummm....don't listen to them. I have a 7 year old machine that works just fine. I upgraded to 2gb of RAM 4 years ago (what you're looking to do) and when the hard drive went bad a few months ago, i just replaced that. It runs great!!! Adding the 2gb of RAM will help and you wont lose any info. RAM doesn't hold anything long term, it just holds info in the short term so your computer can run faster than it would if it just ran off the hard drive. If you have to replace the hard drive, that's when you'll need to back up all your info.

JDay
01-03-2011, 2:45 PM
ummm....don't listen to them. I have a 7 year old machine that works just fine. I upgraded to 2gb of RAM 4 years ago (what you're looking to do) and when the hard drive went bad a few months ago, i just replaced that. It runs great!!! Adding the 2gb of RAM will help and you wont lose any info. RAM doesn't hold anything long term, it just holds info in the short term so your computer can run faster than it would if it just ran off the hard drive. If you have to replace the hard drive, that's when you'll need to back up all your info.

That's all fine unless you want to do things such as watch HD video or use current versions of software.

Flyin Brian
01-03-2011, 3:08 PM
Going from 512k to 2gb is a huge jump and I'm betting you will notice a significant improvement. Get another year or two out of your current system and then upgrade.

orangeglo
01-03-2011, 5:44 PM
RAM is random access memory. It is temporary storage for things that are currently running on your machine. Like say you were editing a notepad document. That info is temporarily stored into your RAM until you decide to save it to your hard drive. That is why when you don't save and your computer crashes/powers off you lose everything.

When you save things to your hard drive it is always saved, unless your hard drive dies.

You can change your RAM without worrying about losing anything.

high_revs
01-03-2011, 6:23 PM
i'm running windows 7 enterprise 32-bit on a 3-4 year old laptop with just a pentium m processor and 2GB of ram. runs fine though yeah, it's slower than my other laptop on a core-duo processor with 3 gb of ram (4gb but technically, stupid mcafee endpoint takes 25% of the ram). it does basic stuff well but i cannot comment on hdmi/hd since it doesn't have blu-ray or hdmi output. so long as OP ok with that, yeah, RAM upgrade should suffice. (you have only 512K? really? gotta be older than 3 yrs no?).

factor in how much the ram is going to cost you vs. the model suggested above. desktops much, much cheaper than laptops and sometimes (if not most times), just faster.

p.s. i say reformat and resintall your data. but since you're asking if you'll if you'll lose data by removing and installing new ram modules, not sure if you're up to it. i recommend this only so you can really see the performance difference by starting clean and removing those vampiric adware/malware crap.

JDay
01-04-2011, 1:56 PM
Going from 512k to 2gb is a huge jump and I'm betting you will notice a significant improvement. Get another year or two out of your current system and then upgrade.

He has 512MB not KB.

Coded-Dude
01-04-2011, 2:01 PM
WHAT CPU ARE YOU RUNNING?

sorry for the caps, but that is the most important part to consider when on the fence about upgrading vs new pc. You can easily get upgraded graphics cards, memory, and hard drives....the cpu is the most proprietary slot. If its fast enough, just upgrade like you are. If its not you may want to buy a new pc(or MB/CPU combo and build a new PC)

high_revs
01-04-2011, 2:30 PM
He has 512MB not KB.

ooppsie.. LOL i meant Mb. :)

512K?? reminds me of my old 386sx. :D

Barbarossa
01-04-2011, 3:25 PM
winultilities (http://download.cnet.com/WinUtilities-Free-Edition/3000-18512_4-75021441.html)


I've had great luck with the above program, to just do simple routine maintenance.

five.five-six
01-04-2011, 3:33 PM
You would probably be better off replacing the system.

I charge a flat rate $100 to copy customer data off the drive, format and reinstall the OS, and then copy the data back on. That is dirt cheap, but it has to be because I can't charge more due to the fact that the client could buy a new computer for not much more.
normaly the new case will have an empty drive bay, I just take the old drive out of the old machine and put it in the new box... $100 seems fair for that



OP, go to curical.com

click "scan my computer"

then

click "download the scanner"

fallow the prompts, then print the findings and go to frys

energizer
01-04-2011, 6:44 PM
Dell Dimension 3100 will take 2x ddr2 1GB modules. $40 is a fair price depending from where you get them.

Stick with brands like Corsair, Crucial, Kingston. Sometime you can get Samsung Original Modules from OEMs.

Later if you feel that your machine is slower, convert it to Linux.



I currently have a Dell Dimension 3100. It has become slow over the last couple of years. I looked online and can upgrade to 2 gigs of memory for 40 bucks. It currently has 512 kb.

The pc has two internal slots currently occupied.by the dual 256 cards. I have no.other slots. When replacing those cards, will I lose anything on my hard drive?

I hope this all made sense.

cherylfoster
01-05-2011, 10:05 AM
You may be better just to replace the system, increasing RAM will not do much to speed up more than 3 years old machine. More likely to be infected with adware / spyware. Malwarebytes running like it should be noted on this point. In any case, if you upgrade the memory to ensure you get the correct type of the machine.

UltraLNW
01-05-2011, 11:13 AM
Replace the system - here's why:

1. Your CPU is likely not a dual or quad core - going from single to mult-core is like going from a Le Car to a Porsche.

2. Your southbridge likely does not support SATA - using an IDE drive is fine until you have to use it after getting used to a 7200 RPM SATA II.

3. DDR memory is slow - DDR3 is the standard now, and DDR4 is around the bend. Plus, most mobos running DDR cannot support more than 2gb. That big of a deal if you are running 32bit OS, but 64bit Windows 7 is priced the same as 32bit, and in addition to the general increase in speed, 64bit OS can support and use more than 3.2gb of memory (32bit ceiling)

I run a relatively outdated system - P45 chipset, QX6700 Quad Core Extreme (65nm), 4gb DDR2-800 memory, 64gb SSD (220 read/100 write), GTX460. A couple years back, it was a screamer, but it lags considerably behind what is available today. I am fixing a buddy's PC specced with a single core Athlon, 512mb of DDR mem, IDE drive. The system is about 5 years old. I cannot imagine having to use it on a daily basis, as my outdated system has spoiled the hell out of me.

Upgrade to a new system and get SATA III, DDR3, 32nm processors, etc etc. You will not believe how smooth it is compared to what you have grown accustomed to.

That Dell deal is still available - $340 for a new system with moitor!

JDay
01-05-2011, 12:28 PM
normaly the new case will have an empty drive bay, I just take the old drive out of the old machine and put it in the new box... $100 seems fair for that

Doing it that way will leave a ton of stuff on the drive that is no longer being used (old Windows install, Program Files, Swap File, Hibernation file, Temp Files, etc), obviously there is more to it.

eta34
01-05-2011, 12:35 PM
I recently purchased a new laptop...nothing fancy, just a $400 Gateway special. The desktop is primarily used to store photos, music, and to allow my kid to use the internet. I am not in need of anything fancy. I use Carbonite to back everything up.

I used the malwarebytes program and found 38 different processes. We will see how the thing runs now.

Someone asked me what CPU is was using. What in the heck does that mean? How do I find out? Obviously, I am not tech savvy. Thanks again for the help.

Coded-Dude
01-05-2011, 12:54 PM
click the Start Bar and right click on My Computer, select Properties. From there you should be able to determine the processor type/speed(its listed in the general tab). It will also tell you how much memory, computer name, etc.

JDay
01-05-2011, 12:59 PM
Someone asked me what CPU is was using. What in the heck does that mean? How do I find out? Obviously, I am not tech savvy. Thanks again for the help.

It's a Pentium 4, all anyone who asks needs to do is Google the specs for your model machine, which you posted.

http://www.dell.com/us/en/dfb/desktops/dimen_3100/pd.aspx?refid=dimen_3100&cs=28&s=dfb

Coded-Dude
01-05-2011, 1:06 PM
yes but that is only the chip classification(not its speed).

[EDIT]
according to your link it should be a 3.2 GHz with hyper threading. if he upgrades his XP machine(which I assume it is) with more memory he should notice substantial difference.

JDay
01-05-2011, 1:15 PM
yes but that is only the chip classification(not its speed).

[EDIT]
according to your link it should be a 3.2 GHz with hyper threading. if he upgrades his XP machine(which I assume it is) with more memory he should notice substantial difference.

That says up to 3.2Ghz. The important thing is that the CPU supports HT (HyperThreading), with this enabled you effectively have a dual-core CPU (one physical one virtual).

Coded-Dude
01-05-2011, 1:17 PM
right, but the tech specs say no lower than 2.8(521, 630 or 640). as long as he is in or close to 3GHz with HT, he should be fine(if he sticks with XP). I agree an upgrade would be warranted with a newer version of widows though.

JDay
01-05-2011, 1:23 PM
right, but the tech specs say no lower than 2.8(521, 630 or 640). as long as he is in or close to 3GHz with HT, he should be fine(if he sticks with XP). I agree an upgrade would be warranted with a newer version of widows though.

He can run Windows 7 with that system no problem if he upgrades to 2GB of ram. I've done it with 1GB on a similar system but there was a tiny amount of system lag (due to the swap file).

Ricky-Ray
01-05-2011, 1:41 PM
I picked up a laptop from work that we were phasing out. It was a Dell Latitude D610 and it was a 1.6mhz processor and only had 1gig or RAM on there. I upgraded it to 2 gigs and installed window's 7 on there. Granted it's a bit slow compared to my other computer but I just use it around the house for surfing the net and whatever.

Basically what I'm getting at is you may not need to upgrade your computer to a newer one is the current one will serve your purpose and YES you will notice better performance going from 512mb to 2 gigs.

IMO if the upgrade is going to cost $40, it will be $40 well worth it and consider upgrading in a few years down the line.

orchard
01-05-2011, 6:35 PM
Get the memory - it will give you enough that the system isn't swapping in and out of paged memory, if all you need it for is email, web browsing, etc.

I'm running 2Gb on an old laptop used for the same purpose, works fines for that purpose. Plus you can have a guest account locked down for the kids :-)

Orchard

MikeH1
01-07-2011, 3:53 PM
Going from 512k to 2gb is a huge jump and I'm betting you will notice a significant improvement. Get another year or two out of your current system and then upgrade.

+1

I just got a 5 year old IBM Thinkpad, upgraded it from 1 GB to 2GB (it's max) and it'll do quite nicely for a year or two or more, even with Win 7. Memory is usually cheaper than a complete new system.

mmrx2
02-04-2011, 12:50 PM
check your task manager to see how much % your cpu is being used and how much total ram you are using. Did you try reinstalling your os? An SSD is a good upgrade to speed up older cpus.

Yemff
02-04-2011, 1:18 PM
Ive got a 1.0Ghz, 2Gb RAM powermac that I got in 2003 that still works like new, the only time it slows is when streaming videos, since the video card is pretty small compared to newer ones. But to answer your question switching ram is pretty much one of the easiest hardware upgrades you can do, just take out old and put in new, making sure you buy the right speed of ram for your computer. However you need to see if your computer can support 2GB of ram, there is a maximum you can use per slot. Good luck!

Wherryj
02-09-2011, 3:09 PM
no, you will nhot lose anything on the hard drive.

when you receive the memory just shutdown and unplug the computer from power

open the case and touch any metal portion of the case to release static electricity.

remove the old memory

open the new memory and compare to old to make sure it has the slot in the same spot

install new memory

close case

plug in

power on

Also, make sure that you have compatible memory and optimally two identical units. Some motherboards are a bit picky about memory, so just having the correct speed doesn't guarantee that it will work.

I've run into that on my Lenovo T42 in the past. Even when using the same company's memory, certain series within the same memory type and speed would work and others were no-go (well documented on the internet/company website).

Wherryj
02-09-2011, 3:11 PM
Ive got a 1.0Ghz, 2Gb RAM powermac that I got in 2003 that still works like new, the only time it slows is when streaming videos, since the video card is pretty small compared to newer ones. But to answer your question switching ram is pretty much one of the easiest hardware upgrades you can do, just take out old and put in new, making sure you buy the right speed of ram for your computer. However you need to see if your computer can support 2GB of ram, there is a maximum you can use per slot. Good luck!

If you aren't sure, Crucial has a memory checking application that will tell you what type, how much per slot, maximum supported, etc. You don't have to purchase it there if you don't want to, but can use it to be sure about what you are buying.

http://www.crucial.com/