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tpuig
12-31-2010, 9:33 AM
Is there any regulation against taking your four legged buddy hunting with you? Not for tracking an animal or to pursue game, just to tag along by your side. My german shepherd goes everywhere with me, and I'd hate to have to leave her for a couple days while hunting.

She even retrieved a pheasant on her first time out. But never again after that. ;-)

thejester
12-31-2010, 9:52 AM
Here is the code as written:


265. Use of Dogs for Pursuit/Take of Mammals or for Dog Training.
(a) Prohibitions on the Use of dogs. The use of dogs for the pursuit/take of mammals or for dog
training is prohibited as follows.
(1) The use of dogs is prohibited during the archery seasons for deer or bear.
(2) The use of dogs is prohibited for the take of elk, bighorn sheep and antelope.
(3) Mountain lions may not be pursued with dogs except under the provisions of a depredation
permit issued pursuant to Section 4803 of the Fish and Game Code. Dog training on
mountain lions is prohibited.
(4) The use of dogs for the pursuit/take of mammals or for dog training is prohibited from the
first Saturday in April through the day preceding the opening of the general deer season in
the following dog control zones:
(A) Central California Dog Control Zone: Napa County north of Highway 128 and east of
Highway 29; Lake County east of a line beginning at the Lake-Napa county line and
Highway 29; northwest on Highway 29 to Highway 20; northwest on Highway 20 to the
Lake-Mendocino county line; Mendocino County east of Highway 101, and north of
Highway 20; Sierra and Alpine counties, and those portions of Nevada, Placer, Amador
and Calaveras counties east of Highway 49; and El Dorado County east of the following
line: Beginning at the junction of Highway 49 and the Placer-El Dorado county line;
south on Highway 49 to Highway 193 at Cool; east and south along Highway 193 to
Highway 49 in Placerville; south on Highway 49 to the Amador-El Dorado county line.
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(B) Northern California Dog Control Zone: Plumas and Trinity counties; Butte County east
of the following line: Beginning at the junction of Highway 99 and the Butte-Tehama
county line; south and east along Highway 99 to Highway 149; south and east along
Highway 149 to Highway 70; south along Highway 70 to the Butte-Yuba county line;
Del Norte County east of Highway 101; Glenn County west of a line beginning at the
intersection of the Stonyford-Ladoga Road and the Glenn-Tehama county line; south
along this road to the Colusa-Glenn county line; Humboldt County north and east of
Highway 36 and 101; Siskiyou County south and west of the following line; from the
Oregon-California state line south on Interstate 5 to Highway 97 at the town of Weed;
north on Highway 97 to the town of Macdoel; south from Macdoel on the Mt. Hebron
Road to the Redrock Road; east on the Redrock Road to the Davis Road; north on David
Road to the Gold Digger Pass Road; east on the Gold Digger Pass Road to the western
boundary of the Lava Beds National Monument; north and east on said boundary to the
Siskiyou-Modoc county line; Shasta County south and west of Highways 89 and 44 and
north of the following line; where the Trinity National Forest boundary intersects the
Shasta-Tehama county line; north on said boundary to Highway 36 near the town of
Platina; east on Highway 36 to County Road A16; north on Road A16 to the city of
Redding; north on Interstate 5 to the south shore of Shasta Lake; east and north along the
shore of Shasta Lake to Fender's Ferry Road; southeast on Fender's Ferry Road to
Highway 299; southwest on Highway 299 to Oakrun; southwest on the Oakrun Road to
Fern Road; east and south on Fern Road to the town of Whitmore; south on Ponderosa
Way to Highway 44 near Innwood; east on Highway 44 and the Wilson Hill Road to the
Shasta-Tehama county line; those portions of Tehama County within the Mendocino and
Trinity National Forests and east of the Ponderosa Truck Trail; those portions of Lassen
County north and west of the following line: north from the Lassen-Sierra county line on
Highway 395 to Highway 36 east of Susanville; northwest on Highway 36 to Highway
139; north on Highway 139 to the Lassen-Modoc county line.
(C) Southern Sierra Dog Control Zone: Those portions of Tuolumne, Mariposa, Madera,
Fresno and Tulare counties east of the following line: Beginning at the intersection of
Highway 49 and the Calaveras-Tuolumne county line; south on Highway 49 to Highway
120; east on Highway 120 to the Smith Station Road (J20); south on the Smith Station
Road (J20) to the Greeley Hill Road; east on the Greeley Hill Road to the North Fork of
the Merced River at Bower Cave; south on the North Fork of the Merced River to Road
3S15 (Black Mountain Road); east on Road 3S15 to Forest Service Road 3S02;
southwest on Forest Service Road 3S02 crossing the U.S. Forest Service-Bureau of Land
Management property boundary in Section 28 located in Township 3S, Range 18E to
Forest Service Road 2S05 (Bull Creek Road); south on Forest Service Road 2S05 (Bull
Creek Road) to the Main Fork of the Merced River; west on the Main Fork of the Merced
River to Highway 49; south on Highway 49 to Highway 140 at Mariposa; north on
Highway 140 to the South Fork of the Merced River; east along the South Fork of the
Merced River to Hite Cove and south on the U.S. Forest Service Road and its
continuation from Hite Cove, through Jerseydale Station and Darrah to the Triangle
Road; south along the Triangle Road to Highway 49; south along Highway 49 to
Highway 41 at Oakhurst; north along Highway 41 to its intersection with the Bass Lake
Road at Yosemite Forks; south along Bass Lake Road and Road 274 past Bass Lake on
the east side of the lake to the junction with the Mammoth Pool Road at North Fork;
south along the North Fork-Auberry Road to the San Joaquin River; east along the San
Joaquin River to Italian Bar Road at the Italian Bar Bridge; south on Italian Bar Road to
Jose Basin Road (County Road M2441; east on Jose Basin Road (County Road M2441)
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to its intersection with Forestry Service Roads 8S08 (Railroad Grade Road) and 9S07
(Jose Basin Road); south on 9S07 (Jose Basin Road) to Auberry Road near Pine Ridge;
east on Auberry Road to Highway 168; east on Highway 168 to Toll House Road; south
on Toll House Road to Peterson Mill Road; east on Peterson Mill Road to Rush Creek
Road at Soaproot Saddle; south on Rush Creek Road to Big Creek Road; east on Big
Creek Road to Dinkey-Trimmer Road at Haslett Basin; east on Dinkey-Trimmer Road to
Sycamore Springs Road; east on Sycamore Springs Road to Black Rock Road at Balch
Camp; east on the Black Rock Road to the Rodgers Ridge Road at Black Rock Station;
east along Rodgers Ridge Road to Garlic Spur; south on Garlic Spur to the Kings River;
west along the Kings River to Verplank Ridge; south on Verplank Ridge-Hoise Ridge to
Highway 180 near Cherry Gap; south along Highway 180 to the north boundary of Kings
Canyon National Park; south along that park boundary and along the west boundary of
Sequoia National Park to the boundary of Sequoia National Forest between Grouse Peak
and Dennison Mountain; south along the common line between R29E and R30E,
M.D.B.M. to the boundary of the Sequoia National Forest; east and south along that
boundary to Balch Park Road; southeast along that road to the west boundary of
Mountain Home State Forest; south and east along that boundary to Forest Trail 30E15;
southeast along 30E15 to the Doyle Springs Road; southwest along Doyle Springs Road
to Camp Wishon; southeast along the Alder Creek Grove-Hossack Meadow Road to
Camp Nelson; south along Highway 190 and the Coy Flat Road to the boundary of the
Tule River Indian Reservation; south along the east boundary of that reservation to
Parker Peak; southeast through Upper Parker Meadow to Parker Pass; south through
Starvation Creek Grove to the southwest corner of Section 15, T23S, R31E, M.D.B.M.;
east to the northeast corner of Section 22, T23S, R31E, M.D.B.M.; south approximately 6
miles to Sugarload Campground; southeast along the Forest Road 24S06 through
Portuguese Pass to the Tulare-Kern county line; that portion of Kern County within a
line beginning where the Tulare-Kern county line intersects the west boundary of the
Sequoia National Forest; south along the said boundary to the Poso Flat-Davis Station
Road; northeast along said road through Davis Flat and Shirley Meadow to Forest
Highway 90 at Greenhorn Summit; northeast along Forest Highway 90, Cow Creek and
Bull Run Creek to the Tulare-Kern county line; west along said county line to the point of
beginning; and those portions of Inyo and Mono counties west of Highway 395.
(D) Southern California Dog Control Zone: Those portions of Los Angeles, Ventura and
Santa Barbara counties within the Los Padres and Angeles National Forests; and those
portions of San Bernardino County within the San Bernardino and Angeles National
Forests.
(b) Authorized Use of Dogs. The use of dogs for the pursuit/take of mammals or for dog training is
authorized as follows:
(1) Dog Control Zones. The use of dogs for the pursuit/take of mammals or for dog training is
permitted in the dog control zones described in subsections 265(a)(4)(A), (B), (C) and (D)
from the opening day of the general deer season through the first Friday in April.
(2) Areas of the State Outside the Dog Control Zones. The use of dogs for the pursuit/take of
mammals or for dog training in areas outside of the dog control zones is permitted yearround,
except for closures and restrictions described in this Section 265 and section 364, and
the provisions of sections 3960 and 4800 of the Fish and Game Code which prohibit allowing
any dog to pursue any big game mammal during the closed season on such mammal or
mountain lions, elk or any fully-protected, threatened or endangered mammal at any time.
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thejester
12-31-2010, 9:53 AM
(3) Take of Depredating Mammals. The use of dogs is permitted for pursuing/taking depredating
mammals by federal and county animal damage control officers or by permittees authorized
under a depredation permit issued by the department.
(4) Take of Furbearers and Nongame Mammals. Furbearers and nongame mammals as specified
in Section 472(a) may be taken with the aid of dogs during the appropriate open season,
except for closures and restrictions described in subsections 265(a) and (b).
(5) Prohibition on Starting Pursuit Within 400 Yards of Baited Area. Pursuits may not be started
within 400 yards of a baited area as described in Section 257.5 of these regulations.
(6) Dog Training. Except for the prohibitions of subsection 265(a), dog training is permitted
pursuant to the following provisions:
(A) Dog Training Defined. For purposes of these regulations, dog training is defined as the
education of dogs through “breaking” or “practicing” under strict provisions that
preclude the injuring or take of animals. Training is distinguished from “pursuit”, as used
in Section 86 of the Fish and Game Code, in that the animal being chased shall not be
killed, captured, or injured.
(B) Prohibition on Killing, Capturing or Injuring Mammals. No person shall kill, capture or
injure any mammal, nor shall any person's dog be allowed to kill, capture or injure any
mammal during dog training.
(C) Prohibition on Possession of Equipment. No firearm, archery gear, crossbow or other
instrument capable of killing, injuring or capturing any animal may be possessed by any
person training dogs during the seasons described in subsection 265(b)(6)(F) below.
Possession of a firearm, archery gear, crossbow or other instrument capable of killing or
capturing any animal is prohibited while training dogs, but such equipment may be
transported to or from a campsite, transported to or from a residence or lawfully
possessed by a person at a campsite provided all dogs are secured and under the control
of the owner, agent or person training or transporting said dogs.
(D) Prohibition on Starting Dog Training Within 400 Yards of Baited Area. Dog Training
may not be started within 400 yards of a baited area as described in Section 257.5 of
these regulations.
(E) Prohibition on Training Dogs on Bear and Other Big Game Mammals or on Protected,
Threatened or Endangered Mammals. It shall be unlawful to train any dog on any big
game mammal or to train any dog on any fully-protected, threatened or endangered
mammal at any time. A person in possession of a valid bear tag may utilize the general
bear season for purposes of educating dogs for bear. A person in possession of a valid
deer tag may utilize the general deer season for purposes of educating a dog for deer.
Only one dog may be used for training in areas where the general deer season (as
described in subsection 360(a) and (b)) is open.
(F) Seasons.
(1) Gray Fox. Dogs may be trained on gray fox from March 1 through the day preceding
the opening of the general gray fox season, except for closures and restrictions
described in subsections 265(a) and (b).
(2) Raccoon. Dogs may be trained on raccoon from April 1 through the day preceding
the opening of the general raccoon season, except for closures and restrictions
described in subsections 265(a) and (b).
(3) Bobcat. Dogs may be trained on bobcat from the day following the close of the
bobcat seasons through the day preceding the opening of the general bobcat seasons,
except for closures and restrictions described in subsections 265(a) and (b).
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(4) Other Mammals. Except for closures and prohibitions described in this Section 265
and sections 3960 and 4800 of the Fish and Game Code, dogs may be trained on
mammals other than gray fox, raccoon and bobcat at any time.
(c) Restrictions on the Number of Dogs per Hunter.
(1) One Dog per Hunter Limitation During Deer Season. No more than one dog per hunter may
be used in the area where the general deer season is open.
(2) Three Dogs per Hunter Limitation for the Take of Wild Pigs. Up to three dogs per hunter
may be used for the purpose of taking wild pigs, pursuant to the following provisions:
(A) No more than one dog per hunter may be used in an area where the general deer season is
open.
(B) No dogs may be used within the closures described in subsection 265(a).
(C) After the general deer season (as described in subsections 360(a) and (b)) closes, there is
no limit on the number of dogs that may be used during the general bear season.
(D) Prohibition on Treeing Switches and Use of Global Positioning System Equipment.
(1) Treeing Switches. Effective July 1, 1995, electronic dog retrieval collars containing
functioning treeing switches (devices consisting of a mercury switch mechanism that
results in a change in the transmitted signals when the dog raises its head to a treed
animal) are prohibited on dogs used for the pursuit/take of mammals.
(2) Global Positioning System Equipment. Electronic dog retrieval collars employing the
use of global positioning system equipment (devices that utilize satellite
transmissions) are prohibited on dogs used for the pursuit/take of mammals.

tpuig
12-31-2010, 1:12 PM
Guess I'm going to get a white cane and a vest for the dog. We'll see what the ADA says... ;-)

mif_slim
12-31-2010, 10:23 PM
Isn't there a limit on how many letters per post?!? Lol

KMG Hunting Safaris
12-31-2010, 10:40 PM
Tpuig,
Are you stricly speaking from a USA point of view? My dog, although used for tracking clients' wounded game, even goes with when I get a chance to hunt for myself. A Jack Russel terrier. His senses often helps me out by picking something up either upwind, which allows me to know that there is something, before I can even see it. Or he spots something sneaking through the brush, while I'm glassing another spot. I always just keep an eye on his nose or ears for signs.
Once you have them as a hunting partner , its difficult to imagine hunting without them.
Man's best friend for sure...

tpuig
01-01-2011, 9:56 AM
Thanks Marius, I've spoken with many PH from many parts of Africa, and they all seem to love the Jack Russel. Tough little buggers.

I hope to make it over your way for a hunt in 2012/13 for a couple months. I've been researching a bit for the last couple years, and am getting lots of great info. Tough part is deciding what to hunt and where. My hope is go over for 2 to 3 months and do some sightseeing as well as a couple hunts in a number of areas. Finances will ultimately decide... ;-)

tpuig
01-01-2011, 9:57 AM
Although I'd love to, I won't be able to bring my buddy along. She's a great dog, but I'd rather not see her become a leopard snack.
But I do take her pheasant hunting with me. The pointing dogs work out front, and she stays by my side.

SupportGeek
01-04-2011, 9:38 AM
Here is the code as written:
<SNIP>



So after reading that wall of text, it looks like you are a-ok as long as the dog isnt used to chase or kill the game.

KMG Hunting Safaris
01-05-2011, 1:32 AM
Thanks Marius, I've spoken with many PH from many parts of Africa, and they all seem to love the Jack Russel. Tough little buggers.

I hope to make it over your way for a hunt in 2012/13 for a couple months. I've been researching a bit for the last couple years, and am getting lots of great info. Tough part is deciding what to hunt and where. My hope is go over for 2 to 3 months and do some sightseeing as well as a couple hunts in a number of areas. Finances will ultimately decide... ;-)

Well since you are looking at an extended trip, I would highly recommend visiting Kruger National Park. Awesome stuff, and you will nowhere in the world get closer to nature.

Big Jake
01-05-2011, 5:26 AM
Isn't there a limit on how many letters per post?!? Lol

This! :confused:

tpuig
01-05-2011, 9:30 AM
I like to travel off the beaten path. While I no longer need to sleep on the ground, I'd rather spend a month in a tent than a week in a hotel.

Kruger is on my list for sure. I'd like to make a big loop, maybe starting off in RSA and going through Namibia, Angola, a quick hop to Uganda, Tanzania, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Botswana. A hunt there and there would be great, but I'd like to be flexible.

Unfortunately, my Rhodesian friends are no longer around... ;-)

Well since you are looking at an extended trip, I would highly recommend visiting Kruger National Park. Awesome stuff, and you will nowhere in the world get closer to nature.