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CalBear
12-31-2010, 9:17 AM
Has anyone else experienced tremendously childish remarks by anti colleagues, friends, family, etc.?

I have had many underhanded remarks hurled at me quite frequently. A few people I know will drop these into conversations at the most ridiculous times. They are basically searching for ways to take a shot at me, even though I almost never talk about guns around them.

The worst are the comments suggesting I'll "go postal" at work at some point. I've had a few coworkers joke that I would bring a gun to work and start picking off everyone. It's incessant from a few people.

Others will joke when the topic of some other state comes up. E.g. if the midwest or south comes up somehow, they'll joke I should go there so I can carry my gun and shoot people.

Another favorite is the insinuation that if I carried while driving, I could turn every fender bender into a shootout.

I'm seriously tired of it, and I've already confronted a few people about their childishness. A few of them are remarkably smart people, but it's like half of their brain drops off the map when talking about firearms. They're like little babies on the issue.

Anyone else experience this?

Matt C
12-31-2010, 9:29 AM
Yup, I get that all the time, and from people I am very friendly with, including the CEO of on of the main companies I work for. It makes me very uncomfortable, considering I have had legal trouble for some very similar crap.

What can you do though? If you get all pissed and say it's not funny, they will really think you are going to go postal. I suppose they feel ok making the jokes because they think the idea of you (or I) doing something like that is silly because they know us, but they don't realize that someone overhearing it might become very concerned.

I'm sure someone will chime in saying we should just keep our hobby "in the closet", but that not always possible, and I don't like the idea anyway. I want to bring more people into shooting, not hide it like I am ashamed.

Just-in
12-31-2010, 9:31 AM
**** Em...

the_natterjack
12-31-2010, 9:32 AM
" You really think I would want to hurt someone? I guess you don't know me very well" is my standard response. Then again I don't talk much about firearms at work.

sandsnow
12-31-2010, 9:32 AM
Yes, but it's all in good fun. Only my best of freinds know about the extent of my collection. Are you sure they are serious?

As far as family goes, long ago my ex-mother in law thought for sure someone was going to shoot at us since I had a NRA sticker on the car. There was no convincing her that an anti-gun person would not have a gun. Another reason that marriage was a mistake.

Flopper
12-31-2010, 9:34 AM
Want to get them to shut up?

Next time they mention you going postal, just :D

SpringfieldEMP
12-31-2010, 9:36 AM
Shoot em!

But seriously, happens all the time. I just sit back and think to myself that if the SHTF or a really big earthquake or something, I will be the one that is able to protect my family. Then all of a sudden, the joke is on them.

stover
12-31-2010, 9:36 AM
Invite them to the range.

SeanCasey
12-31-2010, 9:39 AM
I guess I am lucky in that I don't work around any anti's and really don't know any, even if I did I wouldn't hide my interest in firearms.m unless I felt discretion was needed with a particular individual.

Write Winger
12-31-2010, 9:46 AM
This is where wit fights back. Don't get irritated or annoyed; they feed on that. What you do is illustrate absurdity by being absurd, all the while making your point. Next time they talk about going postal, say something like, "if anyone ever comes in here to shoot up the place, you'll be hiding behind me cuz I'll be the only one shooting back!" or I had an anti say if he had a gun and ever got in an argument with his wife, he might pick it up and shoot her. So I said, "do you have steak knives? Do you ever pick one up and start stabbing her if you get mad? Why don't you be a man and use your bare hands and strangle her?" It does work. After mocking them back, you can get preachy and show them the fallacy of their thinking.

TimRB
12-31-2010, 9:49 AM
A few of them are remarkably smart people, but it's like half of their brain drops off the map when talking about firearms.

That's a very good analysis. I know lots of very well-educated people who magically become simpletons when the subject of guns comes up. It's almost impossible to argue with them since their response is always to rattle off sound bites they've gotten from the "news", but, as has been pointed out already, if you can take them to the range, there's a fair chance you can turn them around.

It's pretty remarkable that regardless of their political views, almost everyone likes to shoot guns. Go figure.

Tim

voiceofreason
12-31-2010, 9:50 AM
Make a list of who has said when and your best estimate of when.

Make a formal submission of the harassment to management with some type of record.

If it continues do it again with a new list.

Harassment is harassment. Doesn't matter why.

Your employer is responsible for keeping your work environment free from comments that disparage you in a way that makes you uncomfortable.

Do NOT under any circumstances respond to their childish comments as they will almost certainly be used against you at some point in time.

If it continues after bringing it up with management twice, consider hiring an attorney.

You have a right to be free from harassment.

joe_sun
12-31-2010, 9:53 AM
I get that but I also have a surprising number of gun owners I work with.

I was in the break room one day and I saw someone breaking into a car in the parking lot so I called the police and they were arrested.

The manager of the office came up to me and said she was surprised I didn't pull out my gun and chase them down. I told her I'd never violate company policy by carrying a gun, she just gave me that.. Uh huh.. look and walked away.

There's also a person (ultra liberal homosexual who I sit next to) who every now and then breaks out with a "Watch out.. don't get him angry he clings to guns and religion"

I'd like to add that I never "outed" myself as a gun owner. I worked there for two years when someone asked if I could give them a ride home. On the ride he started talking about how much he loves guns so I mentioned I like to shoot and we should go sometime. That was my mistake. We went shooting and the VERY NEXT DAY people I didn't even know started coming up to me at work saying "So I hear you're a good shot."

The guy told EVERYONE I mean EVERYONE in the office about it.

It ended up working out thou, turns out there are a ton of gunowners in the office and we've been shooting quite a few times.

cdtx2001
12-31-2010, 10:01 AM
Invite them to the range.

I've done that with a few hecklers, works pretty well. Most actually show up and have a great time. Some of them are now gun owners and get heckled by others. Hah!

BluNorthern
12-31-2010, 10:02 AM
Make a list of who has said when and your best estimate of when.

Make a formal submission of the harassment to management with some type of record.

If it continues do it again with a new list.

Harassment is harassment. Doesn't matter why.

Your employer is responsible for keeping your work environment free from comments that disparage you in a way that makes you uncomfortable.

Do NOT under any circumstances respond to their childish comments as they will almost certainly be used against you at some point in time.

If it continues after bringing it up with management twice, consider hiring an attorney.

You have a right to be free from harassment.

You've got to be kidding!! How about you just suck it up, shrug it off, and ignore them. Do we really need to go the 'Nanny" route here?

River Jack
12-31-2010, 10:03 AM
Next time someone says something like that in mixed company, just turn to the one of the others involved in the conversation and say..."He's got a real real purty mouth ain't he?" Then turn to the offending party and say..."I'll bet you can squeal like a pig, weeeee," and finally..."You gonna do some prayin' for me, boy. And you better pray good." That will either shut them the hell up or get a real good laugh. It should actually defuse the situation and show them that you either don't give a crap what they think or that you at least have a sense (albeit twisted) of humor about the matter.

Trust me, I'm in the same boat you are. Work with/friends with a bunch of antis. If you get too serious about their joking, they will think you really do have a problem with this stuff and really are on the edge. Laugh it off, joke it up, and let them know that when the SHTF, they will be most welcome (for dinner) at your place!

PsychGuy274
12-31-2010, 10:09 AM
Just tell them, "You'll change your tone the day an employee here does go 'postal' and starts 'picking off' people. Don't worry though, it won't be me and I additionally won't be coming to save you."

I always tell my anti friends that the more they illogically nag me about my firearms, the less inclined I'm going to be to help them. My buddy always says, "Haha, I'll never buy a gun, but when SHTF I'm coming over here." And i sternly told him, "No you're not."

CalBear
12-31-2010, 10:10 AM
Everyone's work situation is different. My workplace is quite informal, and we're all pretty friendly with each other. I would never go down any formal complaint path, because it just doesn't bother me enough. I actually get along with most of the people at work quite well -- even the few antis. This comes from the few antis at work, as well as a few friends / family members. It's not meant to viciously attack me, and it may be funny the first time, but after hearing it repeatedly from the same people, and hearing it from several people, it's just not so funny for me anymore.

When I mention it to people, I don't get fiery and furious with them, I just try to show them the absurdity of their jokes. Their "jokes" are basically meant as such, with a secondary point of taking constant jabs at gun owners, and me in particular. These people know me well enough to know I'd never hurt someone else unless totally necessary, I'd never go postal, and I'm quite level headed. I've just gotten tired of the jokes, that's all. It's lame to reduce a serious conversation to childish jokes, or to drag some other topic over to guns to smear gun owners.

River Jack
12-31-2010, 10:26 AM
Deliverance quotes will either bust out the laughs or shut them up.

Bavaria1990
12-31-2010, 10:31 AM
I get it too. they see my NRA decal on the rear bumper and assume it is like a swastika.

My coworkers brought it up and said I shouldn't have one? I quickly told them I have an AK, and an arsenal of others locked down in my compound.

one coworker is my neighbor,I am sure they would like to know if there was a collapse of society that thier is a mosin for them if they need it.

Matt C
12-31-2010, 10:35 AM
.

If it continues after bringing it up with management twice, consider hiring an attorney.

You have a right to be free from harassment.

Wow, I think you are wound a little tight. First off if sue everyone I work for/with how long do you think I will remain employable? Second, I am sick and tired of this crap in America where people think they have the right not to be offended. Get a little thicker skin for heaven's sake. I'm pretty sure CalBear knows how to find an attorney and sue somebody, he is just blowing off a little steam here.

Everyone's work situation is different. My workplace is quite informal, and we're all pretty friendly with each other. I would never go down any formal complaint path, because it just doesn't bother me enough. I actually get along with most of the people at work quite well -- even the few antis. This comes from the few antis at work, as well as a few friends / family members. It's not meant to viciously attack me, and it may be funny the first time, but after hearing it repeatedly from the same people, and hearing it from several people, it's just not so funny for me anymore.

When I mention it to people, I don't get fiery and furious with them, I just try to show them the absurdity of their jokes. Their "jokes" are basically meant as such, with a secondary point of taking constant jabs at gun owners, and me in particular. These people know me well enough to know I'd never hurt someone else unless totally necessary, I'd never go postal, and I'm quite level headed. I've just gotten tired of the jokes, that's all. It's lame to reduce a serious conversation to childish jokes, or to drag some other topic over to guns to smear gun owners.

Pretty much the exact same with me, except like I said I do have a little apprehension due to past legal issues. I think what we need to do is get all of these people to the range and give them BRD, then pressure them to buy more guns. :43:

zvardan
12-31-2010, 10:36 AM
I usually ask them to not accuse me of any "redneckery".

bussda
12-31-2010, 10:46 AM
It is verbal dominance and bullying. When you get an abrupt change in conversation, say something like "Jealous?". Learn to make some jokes about it. Or ask why they are so fascinated by guns, after all, they keep bringing them into the conversation. Just keep it lite.

BusBoy
12-31-2010, 10:46 AM
Deliverance quotes will either bust out the laughs or shut them up.

You ever float a deliverance quote to young'un?? Nothing but blank stares. :D

I work at a large telco in a technical lab environment where you get all types or personalities. Found out one of my co workers was a shooter and invited him to some Action Pistol shooting. Now we openly talk about matches and practice across our desks and the entire office area can hear... we got a few weird looks I think but nothing really anti.

Definitely no jokes about going postal and you gotta be careful also as MANY places of employment have restrictions on bringing weapons onto their property.

ZirconJohn
12-31-2010, 10:47 AM
Make a list of who has said when and your best estimate of when.

Make a formal submission of the harassment to management with some type of record.

If it continues do it again with a new list.

Harassment is harassment. Doesn't matter why.

Your employer is responsible for keeping your work environment free from comments that disparage you in a way that makes you uncomfortable.

Do NOT under any circumstances respond to their childish comments as they will almost certainly be used against you at some point in time.

If it continues after bringing it up with management twice, consider hiring an attorney.

You have a right to be free from harassment.

This is the best response :yes:

Obvious that voiceofreason knows something about workplace
structure and human resources.

My workplace is corporate structure and it has taken a ling time for me to
catch on to their way of human relations in the workplace.

A simple and polite request face-to-face and one-on-one to please refrain
from comments that make you uncomfortable, and infer that official
report to management if harassment continues can prevent full course.
Leave the ball in their court... be nice, but be firm.

If your workmate is a friend, they may see your side and understand. They
may just be joking around and yet not know the extent of what they are
saying can truly affect a person. You need to politely let them know the
reality of what they think is a joke... is NOT a funny matter.

Then if the comments continue... submit report.

wilit
12-31-2010, 10:53 AM
Everyone's work situation is different. My workplace is quite informal, and we're all pretty friendly with each other. I would never go down any formal complaint path, because it just doesn't bother me enough. I actually get along with most of the people at work quite well -- even the few antis. This comes from the few antis at work, as well as a few friends / family members. It's not meant to viciously attack me, and it may be funny the first time, but after hearing it repeatedly from the same people, and hearing it from several people, it's just not so funny for me anymore.

When I mention it to people, I don't get fiery and furious with them, I just try to show them the absurdity of their jokes. Their "jokes" are basically meant as such, with a secondary point of taking constant jabs at gun owners, and me in particular. These people know me well enough to know I'd never hurt someone else unless totally necessary, I'd never go postal, and I'm quite level headed. I've just gotten tired of the jokes, that's all. It's lame to reduce a serious conversation to childish jokes, or to drag some other topic over to guns to smear gun owners.

Well, obviously it bothers you enough to have said something to them and make a post about it on Calguns.

NorCalDustin
12-31-2010, 10:56 AM
I get that from people all the time... Which is why I completely avoid the topic now... If people ask me if I had guns... I'll almost always say, "Nope."

vantec08
12-31-2010, 10:57 AM
I hear you loud n clear, Bear. I get it too -- my sis-in-law refers to me and my shooting friends as "extremists." I will try to be kind to antis and liberals since this forum prohibits vulgar language. Dealing with antis and libs is like potty training toddlers: you get them to where they can hold their water, then one day they stand in front of you and wet all over themselves.
Is that kind?

halifax
12-31-2010, 10:59 AM
Make a list of who has said when and your best estimate of when.

Make a formal submission of the harassment to management with some type of record.

If it continues do it again with a new list.

Harassment is harassment. Doesn't matter why.

Your employer is responsible for keeping your work environment free from comments that disparage you in a way that makes you uncomfortable.

Do NOT under any circumstances respond to their childish comments as they will almost certainly be used against you at some point in time.

If it continues after bringing it up with management twice, consider hiring an attorney.

You have a right to be free from harassment.

Really? I know certain well-defined forms of harassment, such as sexual, are actionable but "You have a right to be free from harassment" doesn't sound right in an at-will employment state.

Please point me to the law that says this. My boss can be pretty mean when I screw up and I'd like to sue him. :rolleyes:

A few fellow emplyees have made comments about my gun habit but nothing I can't just smile about and walk away from.

IGOTDIRT4U
12-31-2010, 11:02 AM
I get that but I also have a surprising number of gun owners I work with.

I was in the break room one day and I saw someone breaking into a car in the parking lot so I called the police and they were arrested.

The manager of the office came up to me and said she was surprised I didn't pull out my gun and chase them down. I told her I'd never violate company policy by carrying a gun, she just gave me that.. Uh huh.. look and walked away.

There's also a person (ultra liberal homosexual who I sit next to) who every now and then breaks out with a "Watch out.. don't get him angry he clings to guns and religion"I'd like to add that I never "outed" myself as a gun owner. I worked there for two years when someone asked if I could give them a ride home. On the ride he started talking about how much he loves guns so I mentioned I like to shoot and we should go sometime. That was my mistake. We went shooting and the VERY NEXT DAY people I didn't even know started coming up to me at work saying "So I hear you're a good shot."

The guy told EVERYONE I mean EVERYONE in the office about it.

It ended up working out thou, turns out there are a ton of gunowners in the office and we've been shooting quite a few times.

You should have asked him what does "angry" have to do with guns and religion. Watch him paint himself into a corner. And then point out some generalization about liberals and show how shallow it would make you look if you used his logic by saying it. Be sure to use non-homosexual references, though! they have more rights than you, ya know!

River Jack
12-31-2010, 11:06 AM
You ever float a deliverance quote to young'un?? Nothing but blank stares. :D

True enough. If they haven't seen the movie, then they won't get the joke. But it should make them feel uncomfortable enough or be weirded out enough to simply drop it.

There's always the..."who else is going to defend us against the coming zombie apocalypse?" response.

If the work place is informal enough you can also reply with making some underhanded equally ridiculous accusation about the offending party. But you gotta be careful and know who you're dealing with very well. Where I work, everyone gets made fun of all the time. Me for my guns and other things, them for whatever respective idiosyncrasies they have, and trust me, we all have them.

SwissFluCase
12-31-2010, 11:20 AM
I am pretty clear that those who don't trust me with a gun, either myself directly, as a member of a socio-political class, or as a citizen in general, are people that are not worthy of anyone's trust, and should be treated accordingly. Disarmament advocates either want to harm people, or they support people, policies, and organizations who want to harm people, and are equally evil.

Nobody want to be called evil, and I have no problem explaining that disarmament is evil. That hits them like a ton of bricks, and the conversation is usually over at that point. Don't justify your beliefs. Make them justify theirs.

I also don't talk about guns in a business setting (or anything else political or religious), unless the parties involved are also shooters (A surprising amount of business executives are).

Regards,


SwissFluCase

ZirconJohn
12-31-2010, 11:21 AM
Really? I know certain well-defined forms of harassment, such as sexual, are actionable but "You have a right to be free from harassment" doesn't sound right in an at-will employment state.

Please point me to the law that says this. My boss can be pretty mean when I screw up and I'd like to sue him. :rolleyes:

A few fellow emplyees have made comments about my gun habit but nothing I can't just smile about and walk away from.

Ya... not going to get a Court case on this, I agree.

Just need to stop the verbal harassment.

But then, you may want to be careful with whom you talk about guns at the
workplace, and you will also need to consider who is around in earshot
distance when you talk about firearms at work.

I have same situation... I have heard it form uninformed idiots at work... but
the fact is I know they are idiots. I just careful who and when I talk about
firearms at work.

One must be diligent in their own reputation of conversation. Corporate
workplace is a very weird thing... yup, a very strange environment indeed...!

Write Winger
12-31-2010, 11:21 AM
Whatever you do, don't use the, "you sure have a purdy mouth" line on the liberal homosexual...

BusBoy
12-31-2010, 11:21 AM
Where I work, everyone gets made fun of all the time. Me for my guns and other things, them for whatever respective idiosyncrasies they have, and trust me, we all have them.

This /\ /\ /\ +1000 were a lite bunch in our department... outside the lab or our department area I rarely speak about my shooting or gun ownership.

nick
12-31-2010, 11:28 AM
I get that at work quite a bit (considering that I introduced quite a few of them to shooting). It usually stops when the person in question goes shooting for the first time.

When I get that, I just tease them back. People say silly things all the time, getting worked up over it is just as silly.

Besides, the guy who everyone "expects" to go postal at work isn't even a gun owner :p He's the only non-shooter in my department, too, so he kinda stands out.

Matt C
12-31-2010, 11:30 AM
Whatever you do, don't use the, "you sure have a purdy mouth" line on the liberal homosexual...

This made me LOL and I had to explain to my coworkers what what funny, and now they know I'm online complaining about them hahah. All good though, everyone is laughing.

The Shadow
12-31-2010, 11:39 AM
Has anyone else experienced tremendously childish remarks by anti colleagues, friends, family, etc.?

I have had many underhanded remarks hurled at me quite frequently. A few people I know will drop these into conversations at the most ridiculous times. They are basically searching for ways to take a shot at me, even though I almost never talk about guns around them.

The worst are the comments suggesting I'll "go postal" at work at some point. I've had a few coworkers joke that I would bring a gun to work and start picking off everyone. It's incessant from a few people.

Others will joke when the topic of some other state comes up. E.g. if the midwest or south comes up somehow, they'll joke I should go there so I can carry my gun and shoot people.

Another favorite is the insinuation that if I carried while driving, I could turn every fender bender into a shootout.

I'm seriously tired of it, and I've already confronted a few people about their childishness. A few of them are remarkably smart people, but it's like half of their brain drops off the map when talking about firearms. They're like little babies on the issue.

Anyone else experience this?

Your observation that their comments are childish suggests that maybe they are immature. In that case, Sigmund Freud had a professional opinion which states "A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity."

robcoe
12-31-2010, 11:42 AM
I get it all the time from some members of my extended family, particulary from my uncle over the fact that I keep a gun loaded all the time. The last time he started in on me for keeping a gun loaded("you live in a good neighborhood, violent crimes dont happend around here" type arguments) I handed him a newspaper article about a severed head being found in a park a couple of miles away, havent heard anything about it since.

BobB35
12-31-2010, 11:59 AM
Everyone's work situation is different. My workplace is quite informal, and we're all pretty friendly with each other. I would never go down any formal complaint path, because it just doesn't bother me enough. I actually get along with most of the people at work quite well -- even the few antis. This comes from the few antis at work, as well as a few friends / family members. It's not meant to viciously attack me, and it may be funny the first time, but after hearing it repeatedly from the same people, and hearing it from several people, it's just not so funny for me anymore.

When I mention it to people, I don't get fiery and furious with them, I just try to show them the absurdity of their jokes. Their "jokes" are basically meant as such, with a secondary point of taking constant jabs at gun owners, and me in particular. These people know me well enough to know I'd never hurt someone else unless totally necessary, I'd never go postal, and I'm quite level headed. I've just gotten tired of the jokes, that's all. It's lame to reduce a serious conversation to childish jokes, or to drag some other topic over to guns to smear gun owners.

Not sure exactly why you posted then if you "get along" with all your coworkers.

As far as a response, mine would be something like...well I guess we will just have to register your keyboard because written words and ideas have killed far more people than firearms and you are looking a little suspicious typing away. Then I would probably follow up with "Do you have the number to the DHS Fusion center hotline? I think they would be interested it you recent comments about Bush"

All in good fun, figure out what ever their hobby is and incessantly mock it. Should be pretty easy...

dantodd
12-31-2010, 12:06 PM
As you can see from all the responses, the correct path forward varies depending upon the work environment. If you are in any sort of "corporate" structure, then do document the comments. It is much better if you document the unsupported comments now rather than having to explain them later if there is some sort of incident, or if a new person joins the company and doesn't know you overhears the comments and goes to HR because they don't feel safe. If you report it first the HR person will know they overheard an on going issue and not some change in your demeanor.

If it were a case, as River Jack described where everyone takes their fair of abuse all in the name of camaraderie you would not likely be posting this here.

If it is a situation where you feel that you CAN respond. (or you have already reported it to HR) I would personally likely take the approach something like: "Gee, is that really how you see me? Why would you EVER think I am likely to hurt anyone?" This puts them in the position of having to explain their comments without being accusatory. Perhaps they'll just say, "Gee. I was only joking, didn't know you had such thin skin." or they might say "Buy you own guns and kill bambi so surely you would resort to using a gun if I said something you don't like." or it might just simply stop the jabs. If they make the "thin skinned" response I'd be pretty tempted to buy them a silhouette target T-shirt.

383green
12-31-2010, 12:15 PM
It's no secret in my workplace that I'm into guns and all sorts of other weird stuff (e.g., today I brought a piece of WW2-era military crypto equipment in for show-n-tell, and it's not even the first time I've done that). Naturally, I've also encountered the occasional childish anti-gun comment, including jokes in poor taste about me "going postal". I used to get torqued by such things, but now, my inclination would generally be to just calmly say something along the lines of "that's really not funny", possibly adding something like "and I find it offensive that you suggest I might get violent here" depending on the circumstances. Getting visibly worked up about the comment would be counter-productive. Depending on whether they drop the hot-potato topic, I might invite them to the range as some folks have suggested; I'd play it by ear, depending on the individual situation.

It's been quite a while since I've received any of these childish and derogatory comments, and I hope that next time I get one, I'll have the presence of mind to remain calm and treat it as an opportunity to educate the commenter. I'd only consider reporting them commenter to HR if their comments were particularly persistent and/or seemed to have malicious intent behind them. In general, I think that the people making such childish comments are more likely to make them out of ignorance than malice.

Matt C
12-31-2010, 12:16 PM
As you can see from all the responses, the correct path forward varies depending upon the work environment. If you are in any sort of "corporate" structure, then do document the comments. It is much better if you document the unsupported comments now rather than having to explain them later if there is some sort of incident, or if a new person joins the company and doesn't know you overhears the comments and goes to HR because they don't feel safe. If you report it first the HR person will know they overheard an on going issue and not some change in your demeanor.


Yeah, that's true. Man I would hate to work in a place like that.

meaty-btz
12-31-2010, 12:24 PM
Actually, any harrasment is actionable. In this case his co-workers are potentially causing a workplace issue and even a legal one (criminal) due to slanderous talk. People and corporations have been dragged into civil court over Slander of this sort and lost out bigtime for failing to deal with it.

Or he could just invite his "friends" to a blanket party ;)

No matter what our good ol prof of psychology I have found that people who mouth off like this usually never had to experience the consequences of their actions or were shielded. I vote for the good ole days when you mouthed off, got decked and the cop you ran to for help laughed at your mouthy *** and told you that you got what you deserved for being a mouthy *****.

To put it in perspective I've been through something at work that makes what our OP here has gone through look like a day playing in the dasies with fine pastries.....

Uriah02
12-31-2010, 12:25 PM
It has never been serious. Usually the jokes coworkers pass at each other to keep things entertaining and light hearted. I get the DHS trifecta of being an active Christian, conservative, veteran so more often I get the "where/when are you going to start building your compound?" type jokes.

Scratch705
12-31-2010, 12:32 PM
at my former work, when co-workers brought up the "going postal" thing, i just responded by saying "maybe, every man has a breaking point if you keep nagging on about me going postal."

that usually shuts that line of "jokes" down pretty quick. but that is only if you really don't care about the job. cause if it filters up to management you would probably be on their watch list to be laid off.

Eddie1965
12-31-2010, 1:03 PM
Most of my co-workers just joke that if shtf, they are bringing their whole families over to my place.

Ford8N
12-31-2010, 1:16 PM
Has anyone else experienced tremendously childish remarks by anti colleagues, friends, family, etc.?

I have had many underhanded remarks hurled at me quite frequently. A few people I know will drop these into conversations at the most ridiculous times. They are basically searching for ways to take a shot at me, even though I almost never talk about guns around them.

The worst are the comments suggesting I'll "go postal" at work at some point. I've had a few coworkers joke that I would bring a gun to work and start picking off everyone. It's incessant from a few people.

Others will joke when the topic of some other state comes up. E.g. if the midwest or south comes up somehow, they'll joke I should go there so I can carry my gun and shoot people.

Another favorite is the insinuation that if I carried while driving, I could turn every fender bender into a shootout.

I'm seriously tired of it, and I've already confronted a few people about their childishness. A few of them are remarkably smart people, but it's like half of their brain drops off the map when talking about firearms. They're like little babies on the issue.

Anyone else experience this?

I have never had anything like that said to me. It's all about respect. Everyone at my job respects each other, we are all different. We kid around but we also know who has thin skin. The thin skins are always the trouble makers so they tend not to last very long anyway. It's kinda like a big family anyway. Some people are into hunting, some surfing, some race cars or moto. Maybe all they do is the family thing with their kids. Guns are considered another hobby, not some evil thing that possess a person. That would be silly. I wouldn't want to work at a place where my fellow workers thought that.

River Jack
12-31-2010, 1:41 PM
This made me LOL and I had to explain to my coworkers what what funny, and now they know I'm online complaining about them hahah. All good though, everyone is laughing.

You see, I told you it would get a good laugh. Eventhough you had to explain...

sevensix2x51
12-31-2010, 1:53 PM
OP- work is just like calguns. dont feed the trolls. if you ignore them, they wont see you react, and they will stop.

if you truly feel harassed or subject of prejudice, you do, in fact, have the right to be free from harassment in the california workplace, no matter why youre being harassed. a quick talk with a supervisor can change a lot of tunes, in an expedient fashion.

BKinzey
12-31-2010, 1:54 PM
Say "Really? The office pool picked you as most likely to go postal!" :D

I've found it doesn't matter what the subject is, it's fairly easy to find someone who has very little knowledge of the subject but very ready to spout an opinion on it:rolleyes:

Grumpyoldretiredcop
12-31-2010, 2:07 PM
The phrase, "creating a hostile work environment" can do wonders when communicated in the correct fashion to HR or a supervisor. It's not "nanny state", it's a right that we should assert whenever appropriate.

Pred@tor
12-31-2010, 2:07 PM
I just stared at them seriously and they choke up... lol They see in my eyes I didnt find it funny. Creeped them out lol...

SAR_boats
12-31-2010, 2:51 PM
Opinions are like arseholes: Everyone has one, most of them stink.

When some of my co-workers saw my gun case in my truck he said "I hope you didn't bring in a gun to kill me." (in a whiny, effeminate voice)

My reply was "Don't worry. IF I ever decide to kill you, you'll never see it coming."

Loved his deer in the headlights look after that.

taloft
12-31-2010, 4:50 PM
I just flip the script on them.

When they make a going postal comment just look at them with a shocked expression and reply, "Really!? you'd do that if you got angry enough?"

they'll usually back pedal in confusion and sputter of course not! Then I'd ask them what makes them think I would. Now they're the one on the hook to explain themselves. Usually they fall on their own swords with the ever lame but, you own guns. To which I point out the fallacy of causation they suffer from. Basically, I show them the fallacy of their thinking in a polite manner. I seldom have the same conversation a second time with the same person. Ignorance is curable.

If I don't like them I just stare at them until it becomes an awkward moment, then give them a death's head grin and reply, "Why don't you come over after work and we can find out together."

That one actually got laughs from fellow coworkers. Fortunately, most of my fellow workers are retired military.

John-Melb
12-31-2010, 5:19 PM
Try "Going Postal, Hmmm yes, where is your work station again?"

Must be said with a far away, slightly vacant look in your eyes

BoxesOfLiberty
12-31-2010, 5:38 PM
Deliverance quotes will either bust out the laughs or shut them up.

"You've got a real pretty mouth."

Works every time. Good for at least 10 seconds of stunned silence.

screaming_spool
12-31-2010, 5:46 PM
just pt with your finger,wink 1 eye and make little explosion sounds

redcliff
12-31-2010, 5:50 PM
Remind them that Ted Kenedy's car killed more persons than your guns have :)

radioburning
12-31-2010, 6:09 PM
"tolerance for diversity", as long as it's the right kind of diversity...

B Strong
12-31-2010, 6:09 PM
Has anyone else experienced tremendously childish remarks by anti colleagues, friends, family, etc.?

I have had many underhanded remarks hurled at me quite frequently. A few people I know will drop these into conversations at the most ridiculous times. They are basically searching for ways to take a shot at me, even though I almost never talk about guns around them.

The worst are the comments suggesting I'll "go postal" at work at some point. I've had a few coworkers joke that I would bring a gun to work and start picking off everyone. It's incessant from a few people.

Others will joke when the topic of some other state comes up. E.g. if the midwest or south comes up somehow, they'll joke I should go there so I can carry my gun and shoot people.

Another favorite is the insinuation that if I carried while driving, I could turn every fender bender into a shootout.

I'm seriously tired of it, and I've already confronted a few people about their childishness. A few of them are remarkably smart people, but it's like half of their brain drops off the map when talking about firearms. They're like little babies on the issue.

Anyone else experience this?

It's your responsibility to rise above responding in kind.

Any anti-gun fool that attempts to bait me, or just someone who takes it upon themselves to make foolish remarks won't get the satisfaction of knowing what I think of them.

Fyathyrio
12-31-2010, 7:30 PM
I find a good deadpan line something like "I guess you'll be careful around my car in the parking lot.", a short uncomfortable pause, then a non-committal laugh as I turn and leave that leaves them wondering if I was serious or not does wonders.

If it's somebody I know, they know I'm kidding, and if it's some random jerk, then who the hell is he to pass judgment on my choice of activities.

Ordnance1
12-31-2010, 10:06 PM
I get that once in a while at work too but they usually back off when I retort with a comment regarding their questionable sexual orientation...

Barkoff
12-31-2010, 10:15 PM
I just point out to them how many states are now shall issue. Then I ask them how it feels to be the last to figure out you have been indoctrinated, in fact you still don't get it, do you?

BKinzey
12-31-2010, 10:51 PM
... I retort with a comment regarding their questionable sexual orientation...

What a way to get HR involved:kest:

frankm
12-31-2010, 11:53 PM
Anti-gunners are so funny. They're like little children. They are so afraid. Why don't you ask them how come their life or family's lives ain't worth protectin'.

frankm
12-31-2010, 11:54 PM
I get that once in a while at work too but they usually back off when I retort with a comment regarding their questionable sexual orientation...

Nothing wrong asking them how the last gay pride parade was in the presence of others. :p

Or when someone is walking by, tell the guy, "I'm sorry, I'm straight" and walk away. LOL!

Dexster
01-01-2011, 12:25 AM
I wouldn't involve HR... Even though using HR shouldn't be a career limiting decision it often ends up going that way...

Funtimes
01-01-2011, 2:55 AM
Pull out a pocket notebook --- glare at them --- write it in it... and then put it back in your pocket.

i bet they stop :)

cbn620
01-01-2011, 3:12 AM
I don't hang out with any people who are very anti-gun and the people I have a mere professional relationship with know virtually nothing about my hobbies. I do have some friends who are not really pro-gun (though they recognize a RKBA), and they make jokes all the time about me being a crazy gun nut, to varying degrees. Sometimes when it is accurate or at least funny I play into it. It can be harmless. I've very rarely ever had someone take shots at me (pun) about my opinions on the 2nd amendment or my shooting hobby outside of the Internet.

GOEX FFF
01-01-2011, 3:31 AM
Invite them to the range.

+++1 on this.

IMO, Politely offer to take them (one?) on a weekend day to the range and expose them...
Don't argue, bicker, even dispute or make other kinds of jokingly back-handed-comments at work or turn your cheek ignoring them...Be the Bigger person.
These people obviously don't understand firearms and that's the main problem here.....they've NEVER been exposed and their lack of exposure contributes to their lack of knowledge, like most anti people. Their mind set about firearms is like a child. The best thing you (we) could do in situations like this with uneducated people is teach, expose and show them the fun along with responsibility comes target shooting as it really is.

Shooting with someone especially a "virgin shooter" while accomplishing challenging yourselves together, hitting a target is also a good bonding experience, even with acquaintances goes a LONG way. If they accept your offer, refrain from getting Human-like targets or talking about "Killing anything or "stopping power" to a first time shooter. Save even the Political and their 2A civil rights stuff for a later time too. First guide them into the realistic world that firearms are tools and alleviate the mindset of violence and "going postal".
You may be surprised on the following work day, how the conversation quiet possibly will have switched to a different tune from them.

Heck, even Justice Scalia took Kegan Skeet-shooting!!

Rob454
01-01-2011, 8:28 AM
My buddies at work make fun of me all the time. There are very few anti's and I rarely had anyone say anything liek postal or watch out don't make him mad. I usually just shrug and walk away but it doesnt bother me when they make fun of me. Of course I get the if something happens Im heading to Robs house. That's when I laugh

if you are in a corporate company then its in your best interest to keep track of who makes disparaging remarks about you. you can go as far as pulling out a note pad and writing it all down with a serious look. When they freak out and HR calls you in pull out the notepad and it will have every date anyone said anything disparaging about you. At this point you can tell the HR person to bring you complaint forms and pencil and a phone. The pencil to fill out the complaint forms and the phone to call a lawyer. Watch people s*8t bricks. To all the people who say be a man, you don't need a lawyer whats this world coming to, Well the way i see it I am beating them at their own game.
If you make any disparaging remarks towards them or they feel threatened by your response ( even if you meant it in a joking matter) you can bet your sweet azz they will go and whine to HR. So f them. They wanna play this I can pick on you but you cant pick on me why should I sit there and take it. If you wanna play this I can you cant game then lets get it on. i bet i can mind f**k you way before you can mind f*8k me. Remember im supposed to be the psycho.

Now if you are in a small company and you know people say it but its all in good fun just go along with it they are just playing. . if it really bothers you then either talk to them and say that they make you uncomfortable when they say what they say or possibly think you are gonna go postal. Also make them feel bad for what they are thinking by saying that you cant believe they think so low of you. people tend to backpedal when you throw a flaming bag of s*8t on their door step. Especially if they are the ones who lit the bag.
if they simply wont stop then go to the boss and let him know what is going on. losing your job over words is stupid but some people need to be put in their place.
There is no reason to go to work in a uncomfortable environment. it has nothing to do with thick or thin skin. you should be able to go to work without being persecuted/belittled by someone.


Something else i want to bring up. i read a post where people advise to shut up when LEO pull you over and demand to search for guns etc. Some are adamant about not being searched or letting anyone search them without warrants PC etc. So why would you stand up for your 2a rights so vehemently yet "let it slide, grow some thicker skin be a man" when it comes to someone mentally or verbally abusing you about the same 2A rights you are so righteously fighting the LEOs for? Either we let everyone poke at us or we put everyone in their place.

emcon5
01-01-2011, 9:05 AM
"The fact of the matter is I was not really "gifted" after puberty. Turns out the old myth is true, owning guns does in fact make you bigger. I started out like a munchkin, but now I am probably 2 or 3 guns away from John Holmes"

Bhobbs
01-01-2011, 10:37 AM
You should tell them the reason you own guns is to protect yourself from liberal antis with butter knives which is the leading cause of injury to gun owners. If they get to make up stats why can't we?

rrr70
01-01-2011, 10:52 AM
Tell them "Your wife has a vagina, does it make her a prostitute?".

ZombieTactics
01-01-2011, 11:22 AM
My standard comment is along the lines of "Well I mostly 'go postal' on old soda cans and paper targets. So don't dress up like one of those at the Halloween party and you'll be OK" This is done with a chuckle in my voice and a gleam in my eye. The point is that I approach it as though they are just teasing and I am doing some good natured teasing back.

It's very difficult for them to get all serious about it then without looking like a complete moron.

osokne
01-01-2011, 12:01 PM
Since these stories, scenarios and hypothetical situations happen to be (mostly) in the workplace... I have to wonder, at what point does it become a "legal issue", or does it even have the potential to go that far?

Especially here in the PRK, where everyone automatically defaults to the frivolous lawsuit, whenever gets their nose pushed ever-so-slightly out of joint?

In addition to the word, "Harassment"... "Slander"& "Libel" come to mind, along with the term "Hostile work environment".

They could be talking about the gun owner, behind their back, making up whatever stories from their own misconceptions and fears. Then there's the old "be careful what you say" issue. You can say things like: "I'm gonna kill that ba$t@rd, if he looks at me funny!" and probably get in a bunch of trouble for saying it. Are the anti's allowed to say "I'm worried he'll shoot me if I look at him funny!" and get away with it? Especially if given no cause, by the gun owner, to say such a thing?

Is it "Mensrea"? The legal term for someone being accused of committing a crime, when in fact, no crime was committed? That's basically what's going on here... Responsible, law-abiding gun owners are being accused of MAYBE committing crimes, somewhere in the FUTURE, crimes that they will never commit.

Quser.619
01-01-2011, 12:26 PM
Like others I've found an invitation to the range is the greatest cure. My brother in-law called me Rambo, until we took him out & let him fire a brink of 22lr. Now he can't to get one. Same goes for another cousin who couldn't believe I built my AR, in California no less & traveled with it. I kept calling it my "EBR" but you should've have seen his face light up when I let him shoulder it & show him how to aim it.

I generally take the kidding to mean that that person is somewhat afraid of guns, but also curious. So the range, for me, has always been the best solution.

Also, they seem to change their opinions pretty quick when they get the safety lecture before handling. They see the patience & focus I apply, the humility I have for the weapon, but also the control. In a way it's like I show them that firearms are not as mysterious or mythical as they have built up in their minds.

CalBear
01-01-2011, 12:35 PM
Regarding why I posted this. I mostly get along with these people. I'm not ending any of these relationships over some comments. That said relationships aren't perfect and sometimes you need to vent or talk with the person about these issues. I still hope to win over the rest of my anti colleagues. And no I won't go down the complaint route. One of them is a company owner (small company). I think harassment complaints are only necessary when things are really bad. This is mostly leg pulling, but I'm annoyed by it enough to vent about it here. I think ill just turn the jokes back at them regarding some hobby of theirs. I may also propose some range time.

Jake71
01-01-2011, 12:52 PM
I get friendly nudging from a couple buddies about "going postal" because they know I have guns. When I was fired/let go from a place we all worked at together, they jokingly told me to let them know if I was "coming back".

I don't take offense to it because they are my friends. Noone outside my circle of friends says anything like that.

I don't know what to tell you, unless you tell them to stop they will continue.

say "I undertand your narrow minded view of the world but I'd appreciate if you stopped making such statements in the future".

gunsmith
01-01-2011, 6:57 PM
the situation can turn serious. I got fired because they knew I was a gun owner, I told a co worker that lite rock music makes me want to go postal, they used that comment as a reason to fire me.

The good news is I don't have to listen to that crud. Metallica rules!

dfletcher
01-01-2011, 9:39 PM
There's probably something deeper at work than a dislike of guns. I had dinner with a friend at Morton's in SF last week, we each smoked a cigar outside (and well away from the entrance) at the end of it all. My friend is 6'2" and "the short one", a couple of folks walking by did the wrinkled nose or dirty look but said nothing. It bothers me not one bit. I think some folks simply don't like seeing other folks enjoying themselves and feel a sense of entitlement telling them so.

cineski
01-02-2011, 9:29 AM
Just memorize a few great but short/concise arguments. I've had so many anti-encounters that I've also learned when to walk away. It's kinda like "The Gambler" ;-). When you do decide to argue, do it politely and use several arguments in a row. One of my favorites is "There's some incredibly evil people running around our streets and I really value my life and the lives of those I love." This usually makes all anti's feel bad because it makes them wonder if they don't value their own life :). Another great one is "There was a girl in downtown LA recently that was killed by two people who broke into her apartment while she was on the phone with 911 who recoreded the entire killing......since in the time it takes you to even get through to 911 a perpetrator can kill you.

But my favorite argument of all is a retort to anti's saying "If you own a gun, it's more likely to be used against you." That's when I just put a big grin on my face and say "If someone's home gets broken into, and they have a gun in their hand which the bad guy takes and shoots them with.......well, that person kinda deserved it." Just love the reaction I get with that. Funny thing is, most anti's have shockingly agreed with this.

You have to realize why most anti's are anti. It usually stems from their own insecurity about themselves. If they have a weapon in their hands they'll be likely to kill hundreds of people....therefore everyone else is guilty about this. They also have a false idealism that the police state will instantly protect them from all threats. I never really understood this until one day while I was hanging out with an old college buddy who turned into a bleeding heart liberal. He saw the folding knife in my pocket and asked to see it. Just the look on his face was priceless as he fondled the "killing device." He (somewhat) jokingly got into a defensive stance and said if people on the subway piss him off he'll kill them all before immediately giving it back to me. Liberals have the mindset of a 13 year old school girl.

cineski
01-02-2011, 9:30 AM
If your smoke was blowing on them you were forcing them to smoke, too. Has nothing to do with seeing you enjoy yourself. You're simply forcing them to smoke when they don't want to. Most smokers don't get this. It's not like you're drinking scotch since you're not standing there ingesting the scotch and then spitting it down the throats of passersby. Smoke just has that unfortunate tendency to bother others.

There's probably something deeper at work than a dislike of guns. I had dinner with a friend at Morton's in SF last week, we each smoked a cigar outside (and well away from the entrance) at the end of it all. My friend is 6'2" and "the short one", a couple of folks walking by did the wrinkled nose or dirty look but said nothing. It bothers me not one bit. I think some folks simply don't like seeing other folks enjoying themselves and feel a sense of entitlement telling them so.

gunsmith
01-02-2011, 1:18 PM
an anti once tried the tired old "they'll take your gun away" argument, I told her if it was really that easy to do then why didn't the smart college students at Virginia tech figure that out?

pyromensch
01-02-2011, 1:29 PM
make a copy of this and post it on your cubicle, or workspace. they might get the message

Pat_H
01-02-2011, 1:45 PM
Has anyone else experienced tremendously childish remarks by anti colleagues, friends, family, etc.?

I have had many underhanded remarks hurled at me quite frequently. A few people I know will drop these into conversations at the most ridiculous times. They are basically searching for ways to take a shot at me, even though I almost never talk about guns around them.

The worst are the comments suggesting I'll "go postal" at work at some point. I've had a few coworkers joke that I would bring a gun to work and start picking off everyone. It's incessant from a few people.

Others will joke when the topic of some other state comes up. E.g. if the midwest or south comes up somehow, they'll joke I should go there so I can carry my gun and shoot people.

Another favorite is the insinuation that if I carried while driving, I could turn every fender bender into a shootout.

I'm seriously tired of it, and I've already confronted a few people about their childishness. A few of them are remarkably smart people, but it's like half of their brain drops off the map when talking about firearms. They're like little babies on the issue.

Anyone else experience this?I actually had that and worse happen when I worked and lived in Silicon Valley, someone accused me of attempting to intimidate others by my bringing Shotgun News to work.

I put that to rest once and for all by stating that if I heard that just one more time, by anyone not just management, I'd sue for their creating a hostile work environment for me. That I had the right to bring what I enjoyed reading at lunch and on breaks, just like everyone else did.

Never heard another disparaging word after that.

dfletcher
01-02-2011, 2:19 PM
If your smoke was blowing on them you were forcing them to smoke, too. Has nothing to do with seeing you enjoy yourself. You're simply forcing them to smoke when they don't want to. Most smokers don't get this. It's not like you're drinking scotch since you're not standing there ingesting the scotch and then spitting it down the throats of passersby. Smoke just has that unfortunate tendency to bother others.

I draw a distinction between smell and health.

People's perfume has a "tendency to bother" others too. Noise has a way of bothering people too. Transitory smell and noise outdoors are not important to include the smell of cigar smoke - smell has nothing to do with health. I hate the smell of fish, but I would never tell people sitting next to me to not eat fish because the smell bothers me.

I was outside, complying with the law - not indoors, no closed area. One woman who complained was walking with a fellow smoking a cigarette. If "not smoking" for a few seconds walking done the sidewalk was that important they could have walked the other way, but being annoyed, putting on a display and letting people know they were annoyed (for these folks) was more important than interacting constructively.

I've had one or two people complain about an UNLIT cigar.

If the result is important, as opposed to putting on a display or telling a person what to do, I should think talking adult to adult and not "parent to child" is a better approach. I think alot of folks, whether guns or smoking, simply want to tell others how to behave and don't like seeing others enjoy something they don't understand.

paintballergb
01-02-2011, 4:04 PM
Just do what I do if someone tries to harass me like that. I just pick what I think is their biggest insecurity and then make a harsh joke about that in front of people. I find that shuts people up rather quickly. I am not typically that mean off a person but if you back me into a corner, I'll send you home crying.

Pavel
01-02-2011, 10:21 PM
Tell them you live in California so all your guns have bullet-button's and 10 round mags, therefore making it impossible to harm anyone.

Overbear
01-03-2011, 8:07 AM
once, and only once I have put a stop to said comments, it went like this.

Coworker/group: This is CA no one needs guns here, why do you own them, are you looking to kill someone?

Me (tired of it): so you are saying because I am gay I might want to kill someone?

Them: (Crickets, uncomfortable looks, then change of subject FAST)

WIN :)

resident-shooter
01-03-2011, 8:13 AM
Oh yea.... "dude, u got guns? Are u going to break into a dormatory and shoot everyone?" I did not bother to even respond.

Havoc70
01-03-2011, 9:27 AM
I usually get the "why do you need to own guns?" question. One co-worker said that by having a gun in the house, I could actually make things worse.

So, I posed this question to him:

"Which would you prefer? Someone is breaking into your house, you call 911, knowing that the police are at best 20-30 minutes away. Meanwhile, you are being forced to watch at gunpoint while the thugs have their way with your wife. Or, someone breaks into your house, you utilize your own firearms to end the threat and then call 911."

They usually can't answer that one.

cmichini
01-03-2011, 9:50 AM
When getting a comment about going postal or shooting up the office or whatever garbage I look at them like they're out of their mind and ask them 'What's the matter with you? Why are you talking like some kind of crazed maniac thinking about using guns to harm people? You may need some professional help for that anger, and you should NOT own or be near firearms with such violent, anti-social tendencies."

IMO it turns the tide as the gun owner is the member of the discussion abhorrent to violence and the snide anti being the one advocating it.

In fact, it may be advisable to report the incident to HR and report their violence-prone discussion and indicate that you think they may be a threat to the safety of the workplace.

Plus I make it a point to never indicate that I'm interested in using guns for any sort of violent act, as I truly am not interested in violence with guns. I don't mention self defense or any other situation in which a firearm may be used against a person or other living thing. It's not that I'm not prepared to act in self defense, but I am truthfully not looking to EVER having to brandish against a person. I keep violence and firearms as two mutually exclusive DISCUSSION matters.
YMMV

PsychGuy274
01-03-2011, 10:02 AM
If they ask why you 'need' a gun then ask them why they 'need' a fire extinguisher in their house. And then make some smart @** remark about how fire extinguishers aren't as fun to shoot. :D

FortCourageArmory
01-03-2011, 10:48 AM
I don't usually hear these types of coments in my workplace...but that's mostly because it's a gun store. ;) However, I worked in corporate America for 20+ years and those advocating a contact with your HR department are right on the money. You want to document the harassment (and that is the correct name for it BTW) and present it to your HR rep. CA workplace law is such that any percieved harassment that is reported and not acted upon by the company is actionable....that means you can sue the pants off the company. You have a right not to be harassed in your workplace for a hobby regardless of what it is. Talk to your HR rep ASAP and at least get it on paper. If someone new comes in and overhears one of your co-workers saying you are a "gun nut" and they file a complaint because they feel unsafe, you will be in a better position having your story already on file.

Sometimes corporate life sucks. This is one of those times. But you risk more by not acting than acting.

mike_schwartz@mail.com
01-03-2011, 10:51 AM
Play their game, but be better at it.

First, when they say something about “going postal” respond with, “it breaks my heart to hear someone dying at the hands of a truly disturbed person who felt that had no way out of their situation other than violence. It is sad.”

So now they feel bad for making light of murder.

Then the next time they make a remark, laugh with them and ask “hey, when are you and I going to go to the range and have some fun? My treat.”

So because you already set them up to show that you are not one to joke about murder and a lack of firearm safety, they trust you. And the one HUGE advantage our side has is that everyone likes shooting guns. I have never heard someone who USED to be pro-gun. I only have heard of people who USED to be anti-gun or neutral on the subject.

After one safe, fun, educational day at the range they will be bragging to all the rest of their friends about how they went and shot a gun.

Whatever you do, don’t get mad. Don’t get testy. Don’t complain. Don’t whine. Remember that they say these things because they don’t know. Not because they do.

Instead, try winning.

Jack L
01-03-2011, 11:30 AM
I have never had a brilliant person say anything but have had plenty of ignorant people comment anti.

CMonfort
01-03-2011, 12:04 PM
[QUOTE=SpringfieldEMP;5532435]Shoot em!

QUOTE]

Damn - beat me to it. This is NOT legal advice.

bluenoise
01-03-2011, 2:15 PM
A neighbor, who is an avid golfer, once asked me why I "need weapons." I asked him why he needs clubs. In response to what he felt was a silly question, he replied, "I need them because I enjoy golf." I told him I enjoy the shooting sports, so why was my question any sillier than his? After all, we both use these tools to put a small projectile into a hole at some distance and the quest for accuracy is what keeps us coming back to try again.

He hasn't taken me up on my offer to go to the range, but he's not really a rabid anti, either. It's just we haven't worked out a mutually agreeable time to go.

Glock22Fan
01-03-2011, 3:10 PM
Golfers are great fun when they ask "Why do you need more than one firearm?" as you can reply "why do you need more than one club? After all, all they do is smack a ball towards a hole in the ground."

Also, why do carpenters need more than one saw or more than one chisel?

Why do mechanics need more than one wrench?

Painters need a variety of paintbrushes,

Why does a stamp collector need more than one stamp?

Would Eric Clapton be prepared to perform all year with only one guitar?

Etc. etc. There can be few occupations or hobbies where serious practitioners only possess one tool.

Wherryj
01-03-2011, 3:50 PM
Yes, but it's all in good fun. Only my best of freinds know about the extent of my collection. Are you sure they are serious?

As far as family goes, long ago my ex-mother in law thought for sure someone was going to shoot at us since I had a NRA sticker on the car. There was no convincing her that an anti-gun person would not have a gun. Another reason that marriage was a mistake.

I disagree. See that many posts on this forum that detail anti-gun types who have shot someone.

Anit-gunners may be no less likely to own a gun, they are just far more likely to feel guilty about it. It stems from their own base impulses. Anti's assume that if they can't control their own impulses then no one else can.

Kingcarcas
01-03-2011, 3:51 PM
Hehe good stuff, this is why i don't really share too much about myself.

Chris M
01-03-2011, 4:10 PM
All 6 other people in my department (I.T.) know i own guns and go hunting. No one has really confronted me.

The woman in my department has a son that's a police officer. She understands the importance for him to carry a gun - especially after he got attacked in a parking lot a few weeks ago while off-duty, and wasn't armed...but she still doesn't get the whole citizen/self-protection.
One of the guys I work with seems to be very anti-gun, but never says anything to me about it.
Another guy just makes inappropriate comments, such as, "Keep it away from Chris - he might shoot it." (no matter what is is we're talking about - pets, kids, inanimate objects, etc). Or, "I hope Chris never gets fired. He might come back here with his guns."

Most people just aren't phased by it, and are actually a bit curious. I was able to introduce one of my co-workers to shooting Trap a few months back. He had never shot a gun before, but he absolutely loved it. I throw the invites out every now and then.

I did get into a discussion about "Assault Weapons" with a very anti-2a co-worker that was at a different location, but he was kind of a lost cause, and no longer works here.

One of my other past co-workers (now retired, and living near Phoenix) absolutely loves guns now. He didn't talk about them much, and never went shooting while I worked with him, but I hear from him occasionally, and last time we talked he was telling me that he's a member of a local shooting range, and goes quite often. He rubs in the fact that he can get a bunch of guns that aren't allowed in CA.

Sutcliffe
01-03-2011, 4:18 PM
Depending on how much of a pain in the back side you want to be........
Warranted or not I bet you could get the harrassment to stop pretty quick by complaining to your manager. Most, larger, companies are terrified of this kind of 'problem' and you could certainly go that route.

Glock22Fan
01-03-2011, 4:26 PM
Depending on how much of a pain in the back side you want to be........
Warranted or not I bet you could get the harrassment to stop pretty quick by complaining to your manager. Most, larger, companies are terrified of this kind of 'problem' and you could certainly go that route.

Yea, tell HR that the voices in your head are telling you to deal with the problem, if HR and the management can't/won't. That should get you out of that hostile environment in a hurry!

:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

Wherryj
01-03-2011, 4:37 PM
Yea, tell HR that the voices in your head are telling you to deal with the problem, if HR and the management can't/won't. That should get you out of that hostile environment in a hurry!

:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

My wife is the HR manager at her company. She is pro-gun, but telling her that you have voices in your head is likely to get you a referral to the employee assistance program.

Best not mention the voices...:rolleyes:

Glock22Fan
01-03-2011, 4:43 PM
My wife is the HR manager at her company. She is pro-gun, but telling her that you have voices in your head is likely to get you a referral to the employee assistance program.

Best not mention the voices...:rolleyes:


In case you didn't notice the sarcasm smileys, I wasn't being serious.

MasterYong
01-03-2011, 4:45 PM
Offer to take them to the range.

I've converted quite a few to the shooting sports in just about the last 3 years, even my folks who were staunch anti's for the majority of my life (until I started shooting).

People are afraid of what they don't understand. Most folks (myself included) never touched a gun growing up. Many (clearly not including myself) may still have not ever touched a gun, even now that they're adults. When I bought my first gun, I was a bit concerned that the first time I shot it the gun would blow up or hurt me or something. It was an irrational fear, one that I had most likely because I had never shot a gun before. By the end of the first day at the range I was ready to buy more. :)

Try to teach. If it doesn't work, eff 'em. They're not worth it if they've never tried shooting a gun and wont even try it just once to prove themselves right.

sandsnow
01-03-2011, 5:18 PM
Yes, but it's all in good fun. Only my best of freinds know about the extent of my collection. Are you sure they are serious?

As far as family goes, long ago my ex-mother in law thought for sure someone was going to shoot at us since I had a NRA sticker on the car. There was no convincing her that an anti-gun person would not have a gun. Another reason that marriage was a mistake.

I disagree. See that many posts on this forum that detail anti-gun types who have shot someone.

Anit-gunners may be no less likely to own a gun, they are just far more likely to feel guilty about it. It stems from their own base impulses. Anti's assume that if they can't control their own impulses then no one else can.

Wow, talk about severe looney bin material, that is anti's with guns.

damon1272
01-03-2011, 6:15 PM
This is the best response :yes:

Obvious that voiceofreason knows something about workplace
structure and human resources.

My workplace is corporate structure and it has taken a ling time for me to
catch on to their way of human relations in the workplace.

A simple and polite request face-to-face and one-on-one to please refrain
from comments that make you uncomfortable, and infer that official
report to management if harassment continues can prevent full course.
Leave the ball in their court... be nice, but be firm.

If your workmate is a friend, they may see your side and understand. They
may just be joking around and yet not know the extent of what they are
saying can truly affect a person. You need to politely let them know the
reality of what they think is a joke... is NOT a funny matter.

Then if the comments continue... submit report.

This is the best course of action to survive in the workplace. I would add that in the complaint that you add that you feel that this is creating a hostile work enviroment. Document every comment and who said them. Otherwise you can be painted and percieved by upper management as some gun kook rather than putting management on the defense. BELIEVE ME this is the smartest thing you can do to protect your reputation and job. Bring this up to the supervisor. This does not have to go as far as punishment if your management handles things correctly. If they fail to handle the situtation and things persist then they are setting themselves up for a large settlement for a hostile enviroment and failure to prevent harrasment.

97F1504RAD
01-03-2011, 6:19 PM
Here's an idea for ya. Keep a box of diapers at your desk and every time they spout off, toss them a diaper and tell them when they stop acting like a child you will stop giving them their diapers.

However zirconjohns advise is probabaly best.

IrishPirate
01-03-2011, 6:33 PM
Just recite this piece from Fight Club (by the way, the scene in the book is better and has more guns in it!!!)
Well, I gotta tell you, I'd be very, very careful who you talk to about that. Because the person who wrote that is dangerous. And this button-down, Oxford-cloth psycho might just snap and then stalk from office to office with an Armalite AR10 carbine gas-powered semiautomatic weapon, pumping round after round into colleagues and co-workers. This might be someone you've known for years. Someone very, very close to you.

bussda
01-03-2011, 8:18 PM
On this thread http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?p=5550565#post5550565 it leads to this link http://www.buckeyefirearms.org/Raging-Against-Self-Defense which lets you prove the person making the childish remarks is the problem. :)

OC-Indian
01-03-2011, 8:24 PM
I had the exact opposite experience. When people in my office found out I had a modest collection they suddenly became very polite