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View Full Version : I'm getting a T1 - INTO MY APARTMENT!


oaklander
12-28-2010, 2:14 AM
OK, as some of you know - I moved to Sonora (CA) to get married recently. My boss was nice enough to let me telecommute.

:)

The only problem is that I don't live in an area where you can get any decent internet. There's NO cable, NO DSL, and both "long distance" wireless internet and satellite are not reliable because of the trees between where we live and the nearest antenna (or satellites).

For the last few months, I've been using an "air card" - but it's not reliable, and the upstream bandwidth isn't sufficient for a lot of what I need to do for work. . .

Anyways, on a long-shot - I asked my boss if he would pay for 1/2 of my T1 - and he AGREED!

So now I just signed a contract for a "real" T1. Hopefully, it should be installed in 17 days (per the SLA). I can't wait - and it's kind of strange too. . .

It's not that fast (at 1.54), but I never thought that I would be connected to the 'net via a "real" T1. I'll miss the 20mbps that I was getting with my cable internet in Oakland, but I will like the 99.999 percent uptime in the SLA.

NSR500
12-28-2010, 2:25 AM
Nice!

At least you won't have to worry about the consumer level service and the possibility of throttling.

oaklander
12-28-2010, 2:29 AM
Tell me about it!!!!

The cable was nice, until everyone on the block started streaming videos at the same time. And satellite is OK, unless you use all your daily bandwidth - which I think for Hughes.net might be as low as 400mb.

The other thing that is nice is the latency guarantee in the SLA - 75ms - and I expect it to be a LOT lower than that - also they promise only a .1 percent monthly packet loss. . .

:D

Nice!

At least you won't have to worry about the consumer level service and the possibility of throttling.

sepiid
12-28-2010, 2:30 AM
i had a t1 for 5 years. loved it. most reliable connection i ever had. and as a family guy it was fine.

but as a nerd and professional geek it was just ok. i loved the static IP and the 99.999 sla, i also loved the ability to run servers. but after being spoiled on fiber at one location i began to hat the 1.544 and yearned for a 50mb+ fiber line.

oh the dreams

anyway a t1 is perfectly sufficient for running multiple concurrent rdp and vpn connections. but grabbing those large files, you will begin to understand the 146KBs downstream limit! it is not as fast but does the job

den888
12-28-2010, 8:30 AM
Cool!

bigmike82
12-28-2010, 8:37 AM
Why not get three and bond them?
:)

I too am jealous.

Kodemonkey
12-28-2010, 8:40 AM
Funny how 30-40 year old technology is the most stable. Is ISDN still around? One thing to look out for after they install it is buzzing noise on your POTS line (if you still use one). On locations that only had 25 pair I used to have to do some juggling to keep the noise away from the POTS lines. But most residential only have two pair so you just ate up everything with a T1 (one for TX and one for RX). Speed isn't as spectacular as others have said, but it will be rock solid reliable. Congrats.

den888
12-28-2010, 10:06 AM
My AT&T U Verse Broadband service (3 mbps downstream bandwidth) is pretty stable also. I am pretty impressed.

thrasherfox
12-28-2010, 10:31 AM
I didnt read every post word for word, so sorry if this was covered already.

T1's for some reason are expensive.

Have you thought about going with a 4G wireless broadband device?

Here is a link for you

http://shop.sprint.com/en/solutions/mobile_broadband/mobile_broadband_4G.shtml

Sprint offers 4G mobile broadband.

Verizon will soon (but probably not fully realized until mid 2011)

If you look at the speeds of Sprints 4G, I think it would be faster than your T1 (if you can get 4G in your area)

I know Verizon has good coverage and I think their 4G network is online and they are starting with just 4G mobile broad band devices. they will not actually start selling 4G phones until mid 2011.

this article is a few months old, but says Comcast us getting into the 4G market

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-10275324-94.html

Bottom line is you might want to look for a 4G solution, if you can find a 4G solution for your area it might be better than a T1

Good luck

GrizzlyGuy
12-28-2010, 10:55 AM
Congrats! I was in a similar situation so we had a T1 run up to the house back in 2004. The uptime has been phenomenal, you won't be disappointed.

We did the Hughes Net satellite internet for a few years before that, but the lag time was killing me while trying to operate remote servers over the net. Move mouse, wait for the delay, finally see the mouse move on the screen. That lag and the constant need to go outside and brush snow off the dish sealed the deal on the need for a T1. Moving to that was the best decision ever.

hnoppenberger
12-28-2010, 11:38 AM
just curious, but whats that gonna cost? install and the monthly?

DirtNapKing
12-28-2010, 11:53 AM
just curious, but whats that gonna cost? install and the monthly?Hold onto your shorts, it's not cheap! :D

GrizzlyGuy
12-28-2010, 3:36 PM
just curious, but whats that gonna cost? install and the monthly?

Roughly speaking: In a month you could choose to shoot around 1500 rounds of .45 ACP or... you could pay your monthly T1 bill. Of course if you reload, then you could shoot a few more rounds. Professional shooters get free ammo as an employment benefit and professional geeks get free bandwidth. The government doesn't pay for any of it, so it's all good. ;)

oaklander
12-28-2010, 3:39 PM
Basically, the lowest you can get in this area works out like this:

1 year contract = about $532 to $535 per month, accounting for install amortized across 12 months.

2 year contact = $470 to $474 per month, accounting for install amortized across 24 months.

3 year contract = $450 per month, no install.

I talked to several providers, either you pay a lot for install and get a cheaper monthly, or you pay more monthly and less for install. The basic amount that you pay is the same within $5 among the three lowest priced providers.

EDIT: interestingly, http://cpr.bellsouth.com/guidebook/ca/0006-0007.pdf (page 28) appears to indicate that the above pricing is pretty much what ATT would charge, if you got the T1 directly from them (assuming they don't tack on other charges).

All of this T1 stuff is way strange, since it can be used in so many ways, and has been around as a protocol/hardware since the late 1950's. Phone stuff is just strange to me.

just curious, but whats that gonna cost? install and the monthly?

Kodemonkey
12-28-2010, 8:47 PM
Wow T1s used to cost me $2700 for IP trimmed traffic back in 93. Still, at $400-500 a month one needs to ask if moving to a different apartment would be the wise thing to do. I mean you could get an upgraded apartment across town or even down the street with a cable modem and still be money ahead. My cable modem consistently puts up 2mb and 10-15mb down. Latency is around 60ms.

Dutch3
12-29-2010, 5:25 AM
Funny how 30-40 year old technology is the most stable. Is ISDN still around?

I had an ISDN circuit out here in the boonies for a few years. The only other choice was dialup at about 19.2kbps.

The ISDN cost about $140/mo including the dual-channel ISP fees. It was much better than dialup (I also "telecommute" and babysit servers from home, etc.) and fairly reliable. The downside was the 20+ miles of wet cable between me and the CO, and the fact that most current ATT techs are not familiar with ISDN. On a couple of occasions, I had to contact a supervisor down in Pasadena that was able to light a fire under the local crew to get things working.

Thankfully, a lightning strike a few years ago destroyed the local pairgain equipment (thank you, God!) and it was replaced with a DSL-capable RT.

At work, we have gigabit connections to our ISP, but still have a T-1 at each site for failover backup.

zenmastar
12-29-2010, 3:47 PM
:D I'm getting a T1 - INTO MY APARTMENT!

Not impressive in this decade or the last one at all. You should look into WiMAX (not cellular version) internet providers first. There are some for Sonora area.

T1 in this decade is the equivalent of 56Kbs of the last decade.

zenmastar
12-29-2010, 3:47 PM
double tap, internet service here is too fast!

oaklander
12-29-2010, 10:49 PM
We have a tree problem (and the ones that need cutting are not on our property). So no "line of sight" anything.

We are staying here because we are getting a really good deal on the apartment, and with my boss paying about half, I don't pay the full amount.

We will probably stay here about a year or so, then transfer the T1 to where we move for the remainder of the 2 year contract. Right now we are both broke, since the wedding was fairly expensive (I wanted to give my wife a nice wedding), and we both have some back bills to take care of.

What I will likely do, depending on if the bandwith supports it, is set up a second monitor with a virtual terminal connected to one of our servers, and use that to access and edit files on our file server - then use my local computer (via VPN) for email and the "cloud" software that I use for most of my work.

Not impressive in this decade or the last one at all. You should look into WiMAX (not cellular version) internet providers first. There are some for Sonora area.

T1 in this decade is the equivalent of 56Kbs of the last decade.

Nessal
12-30-2010, 11:29 PM
Not impressive in this decade or the last one at all. You should look into WiMAX (not cellular version) internet providers first. There are some for Sonora area.

T1 in this decade is the equivalent of 56Kbs of the last decade.


Then 99.9999% of the population must be prehistoric.

hcbr
12-31-2010, 6:41 PM
man this is nostalgia for me, T1 was great at it's time, and hey, for work purposes, if you don't need anything critical or huge down the pipe, it's just fine to do regular work and browsing! I'm sorry to hear your area has no provision for any options, which would drive me NUTS!

Anyways, enjoy the t1 and use up that sucker!

SikDMAX
12-31-2010, 6:44 PM
Sounds like T1 isnt all as hot as it used to be?

Cokebottle
12-31-2010, 7:48 PM
It's not that fast (at 1.54), but I never thought that I would be connected to the 'net via a "real" T1. I'll miss the 20mbps that I was getting with my cable internet in Oakland, but I will like the 99.999 percent uptime in the SLA.
Amazing.

It wasn't that long ago (was 1995 that long ago?) that a single T1 was sufficient for an ISP to support 300 subscribers.

sepiid
01-03-2011, 12:26 PM
at times i would give up my 60$ a month comcast for my old 500$ a month t1 just cause comcast connection sucks so much.

constantly having to reboot there "new" docsys 3.x modem and tv jittering and phone service that is iffy

i know in the marin county there is a company called webperception.com a local isp that provides great service! (i used them for 5 years) they might be able to point you in the direction of someone similar in sonora county

command_liner
01-03-2011, 5:02 PM
ISDN still has some magic, but it is slow.

The reason ISDN is good is because it is considered residential telephone service
when you order it at a residence. As a result, the PUC gets involved when you have
outages. Nobody knows how it works, or even how to order it, but you can get it.

When it comes to being pushy, there is nothing quite like ISDN. If you have PacBell,
just whip out the consent decree that they are _still_ operating under, and start
reading the provisions. I especially like the penalty: PacBell has to pay you $5 per
day that your ISDN service does not work! Try that with the cable company. I am
one of the handful people that actually collected on that.

sevensix2x51
01-03-2011, 5:09 PM
i think i might get an oc3 at the house, so i could actually win on call of duty. sure, its a little cost prohibitive, but in the end, i think its worth it. this cable internet just doesnt cut it, even with my gamer lounge router. i havent seen better than 2megabits per second when i download my public domain songs.

i remember when t1 was the hottest thing out... i think i was on a 19200baud modem.
just the idea of having it at your house makes me feel a little giddy inside, my inner repressed youth computer nerd is coming out... awesome.

sepiid
01-04-2011, 9:49 AM
a dedicated oc3 would be 45Mb/s symmetrical
and would hit about 20k /m +install +trenching +fiber run +everything else involved in digging up your street and local permits and ...

but the 20k/m kinda throws me off. but if i was a bazillionare...

evidens83
01-04-2011, 10:19 AM
I'm jealous.

wash
01-04-2011, 2:55 PM
My employer foolishly leased a building about 3 years ago which had no means of internet connection beside T1 line (and 2/3G wireless). We had to do T1 at about $400 a month after we used an air card for a few days.

We just moved in to another building and now can get a faster $60 a month cable modem setup on a comercial account with guaranteed uptime and whatever else they do different from residential customers.

So far I haven't noticed a difference but I haven't downloaded any large files yet.

On the other hand, I doubt I'll ever have a connection as sweet as what I had at UCLA, 10baseT straight in to the backbone when most people were still on 14.4 kbps dial up.

Deucer
01-04-2011, 3:46 PM
My employer foolishly leased a building about 3 years ago which had no means of internet connection beside T1 line (and 2/3G wireless). We had to do T1 at about $400 a month after we used an air card for a few days.

We just moved in to another building and now can get a faster $60 a month cable modem setup on a comercial account with guaranteed uptime and whatever else they do different from residential customers.

So far I haven't noticed a difference but I haven't downloaded any large files yet.

On the other hand, I doubt I'll ever have a connection as sweet as what I had at UCLA, 10baseT straight in to the backbone when most people were still on 14.4 kbps dial up.

Wow, how many other people here went to UCLA? Go Bruins.

I miss my T3 connection...