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maxicon
12-22-2010, 3:20 PM
I've got some troubled Garands here, and no shooter. Any suggestions on what to do with these would be helpful.

First one is a reweld. It's in pretty good shape aside from that, as far as I can tell. The guy I got it from shot it a few times and it didn't cycle well, so he looked closer, and figured out the problem. He basically got ripped off in an online sale.

The other one is one of those tarted-up high price commemorative models that was badly stored while in the display case, so it rusted pretty badly, and the finish is cracking off of the stock. The wood actually looks pretty good under the fake glossy tigerstripe finish.

Anybody have any idea what receivers are used when they build commemorative Garands? I'd assume they're refinished military ones. This one had a glossy finish and a custom serial number.

I figure I've got a few options.

- Buy a Garand from CMP to get a good shooter, and sell these off for whatever they're worth, with full disclosure of their problems.

- Have the receiver from the commemorative Garand stripped, refinished, and rebarrelled, and use the best of both guns to build one decent one. After 'smith charges, I'm not sure I'd be better off than just buying a CMP.

If I sell the reweld, I'm worried that someone unscrupulous will turn a profit by re-selling it as a good gun. Should I mark the receiver somehow?

Any thoughts on this are appreciated.

The sad pair...
http://maxicon.com/guns/bb/garands_sad-1a.jpg

The reweld receiver
http://maxicon.com/guns/bb/garand_reweld_receiver-1a.jpg

And the rusted one
http://maxicon.com/guns/bb/garand_comm_receiver-1a.jpg

cmaher55
12-22-2010, 3:23 PM
Sell them both off and get a CMP Garand like you said.... Just disclose to the buyer that it is a reweld and let it go at a lower price to get rid of it. That's what I would do. Regards

user name
12-22-2010, 3:25 PM
you can cut up the reweld and sell the parts!

Professor Frink
12-22-2010, 3:45 PM
Why not part-out the reweld and sell the parts off, then keep the reciever as a paperweight, a doorstop... or throw it in the ocean.

You never know, you might find some WRA, International Harvester, or H&R parts on that one. Folks are always looking for decent M1 parts and looking for the parts to make their M1 origional.

Flyin Brian
12-22-2010, 3:59 PM
I would buy a good receiver on Gunbroker for $180 to $200 and have someone install your barrel onto it. There's a member up in Santa Cruz that works on Garands.

Maybe you could trade the commemorative rifle to a Garand smith for a receiver and the labor plus a few upgrades?

TRICKSTER
12-22-2010, 4:47 PM
Part them out. If the barrels and other parts are in decent shape, you can make more than enough to buy a CMP Service Grade.
By the way, I believe that the Commemorative Rifles used commercial Springfield receivers, not USGI.

Sailormilan2
12-22-2010, 4:53 PM
Buy a stripped receiver from the CMP($195 + 9.95S&H), then transfer your parts from the Reweld and install them onto the stripped reciever. You can save a bit of money that way.
The wood on the Reweld is some decent looking wood, and you will end up with a nice looking Garand for less money.
There is a forum member in the Santa Cruz area who can help you put it together. If you lived closer to me, I would do it for you at no charge.

maxicon
12-22-2010, 5:14 PM
Thanks - lots of good suggestions here.

Turns out there's a guy on the CMP forum who makes floor lamps out of bad Garand parts and auctions them off for vet benefits. He says the hardest part to find is bad receivers, and he hates to use good ones for obvious reasons.

He suggested he might be able to work out where I can get one good Garand out of the two, so I'm going to see what he comes up with. This would be a pretty ideal solution.

http://andyz28.com/supportm1forvets.html

GuyW
12-22-2010, 5:14 PM
Clean up the commemorative yourself and make it a shooter...
.

bjl333
12-22-2010, 5:43 PM
I would buy a good receiver on Gunbroker for $180 to $200 and have someone install your barrel onto it.

Clean up the commemorative yourself and make it a shooter...
.

^ These two ^ Looks like you could still get two shooter grade guns out of this deal!!

Noonanda
12-22-2010, 6:38 PM
That commemorative Rifle aint worth any more than a regular garand in my eyes, especially now. I would take the commemorative, clean off the rust on it and put it in the reweld stockset, then sell all the rest of the parts. you might as well shoot it now as the rust has destroyed whatever collector value it had (which from what I have read, aint much more than a regular rifle). Alot of people drop some serious cash on those "commemorative" rifles and pistols they put out only to find out they are like mitchells mausers, they look nice but no one will pay what you paid for it.

smle-man
12-22-2010, 8:58 PM
Actually a reweld receiver if done correctly is as servicable as an original receiver. The trick is knowing who did it which I'm guessing you don't. Lots of rewelds have had thousands of rounds put through them by unknowing owners for decades without problems.

AJAX22
12-22-2010, 9:02 PM
I have a buddy who would like to play with his new heat treating setup.. that reweld could be a good project for him.

Dr.Mauser
12-22-2010, 9:33 PM
How did that Garand get so damn rusty? It makes me sad :(

WilliamAnderson
12-22-2010, 9:43 PM
When I saw those two, I had the same feeling that I get when I go to the pound :-(

gunboat
12-22-2010, 9:50 PM
I agree with smle-man - the issues with your weapon may not be related to welding -
Heat treat or re-heattreat is not an issue, center section, the welded area, does not need heat treat.
The big issue with the welded recievers was warpage that could not be corrected.
You had to go thru a lot of half recievers to find the long front ends and long rear sections to make a good weld-up. If they were cut too close to the threads or the rear housing they were not salvagable.

El Gato
12-22-2010, 10:06 PM
Clean up the commemorative yourself and make it a shooter...
.

+1

so the finish is toast... and what..shooting it is gonna make it worse...?

commemoratives are often not that good of investments anyway...shoot the crap outa it....that's my vote...

maxicon
12-22-2010, 10:09 PM
The original owner of the re-weld said it didn't run very well, which was what made him check it out closer. I'm not eager to put any rounds through it, but the rest of the parts look pretty good to my unpracticed eye. I'm sure some run just fine, but it's not a chance I'm willing to take.

The commemorative is pretty rusted - I had to pound it to get the slide open - but I haven't put much effort into it yet. I'm concerned about the origins of the receiver. Most commemoratives are never fired, so they may have used a junk receiver to build it. Some of the parts are gloss blue (yuck!), and most of the external parts (including the barrel) will have some serious pitting when cleaned up. The bore's got some junk in it too, and I'm just not sure it's worth the time.

Anyway, I may get a decent receiver, build up one, and donate the rest of the parts to the lamp guy. Probably the most cost-effective, but even that's approaching the cost of a CMP gun.

Sailormilan2
12-22-2010, 10:15 PM
If you are already a member in the CMP's system, it would be cheaper to buy the receiver from them. Going through Gunbroker means the receiver would have to go through a dealer, with the registration, and 10 jail time.
One thing to check for with the "reweld", field strip it, and look closely at the taper in the barrel just in front of the chamber. Make sure there isn't a small seam there. Many rewelds had a barrel put together out of a stubb made from a worn out/shot out Garand barrel, pressed/silver soldered to a reprofiled 1903 Springfield barrel.

Anchors
12-22-2010, 10:59 PM
Edit. Decided to make a new thread because I have way more off topic questions.

Noonanda
12-23-2010, 6:48 AM
If you are already a member in the CMP's system, it would be cheaper to buy the receiver from them. Going through Gunbroker means the receiver would have to go through a dealer, with the registration, and 10 jail time.
One thing to check for with the "reweld", field strip it, and look closely at the taper in the barrel just in front of the chamber. Make sure there isn't a small seam there. Many rewelds had a barrel put together out of a stubb made from a worn out/shot out Garand barrel, pressed/silver soldered to a reprofiled 1903 Springfield barrel.

IIRC I read somewhere that they used blue sky reimported recievers and newly made ones from when SAI did a production run of Garands. They wouldnt risk the liability using a crap reciever in a commercial venture like that. If the barrel isnt toast in it, you have alll the parts you need of the other rifle to un-Bling it.

justMike
12-23-2010, 12:49 PM
You really need to go through that commemorative and see what the facts are. Seems to me you are supposing a lot about it, that junk in the bore may be the remnant of preservative. Do yourself a favor and find out for sure its condition, even with some pits I've heard they can shoot just fine. JMO:yes:

6mmintl
12-26-2010, 5:07 PM
Kendog4570 can refinish the metal and tell you if barrels are good/worth keeping, stocks can be refinished, your only out the welded receiver and that gun could be a great cast bullet shooter practice gun.