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CALI SHOT DOC
12-06-2010, 1:39 PM
I was at Guns Fishing and Other Stuff in Vacaville looking at their browning safes and was wondering how people like them? How are they compared to Costco's Canon safes since Canon Safes are a third the price.

I really like the MOLLE system on the door Browning has so you can modify it anyway you want and store magazines and pistols there as well. Looking at the 24 gun safe.

Any advice,

Browning is a little more expensive but is it worth it over a cheaper safe like Canon (or another safe?)

bsg
12-06-2010, 6:04 PM
besides the feedback you might get here... i suggest you look on internet regarding discussions of the newer Browning safes.

also check on previous discussions here on the forum with your search button.

good luck.

Hot Brass
12-07-2010, 7:35 PM
I have no doubt that Browning makes a good safe. I sold mine, it was too small after years of service and later I found out the steel in the body was VERY thin.

Look around, you will a very good safe and more safe for what the Browning will cost you.

NytWolf
12-07-2010, 8:05 PM
Not sure what you mean by "VERY thin". Most safes use 12-gauge (0.104") steel for their bodies, as do the Browning safes. The premium Browning safes have 3/16" (0.1875") steel bodies; but then again, so are other safe makers' premium safes. With the Browning, you just pay more for the same features.

My only beef with Browning safes is their use of a glossy finish, which makes it high maintenance to keep it clean and expensive. Well, that and the fact that they put their hinges on the outside. To me, that's ugly and it's also a weakness although they do use bolts on the hinge side.

I prefer a matte finish, which costs less to make, and internal hinges. If you are concerned about body thickness, when you pay between $500 to $1000, you're most likely going to get a 12-gauge safe. When you go beyond that, you'll get a 3/16" (7-gauge) safe.

Saym14
12-07-2010, 10:42 PM
how much is it? I got the Costco Cannon for $750 to my door. Cannon has a great warranty too,

esskay
12-12-2010, 2:41 AM
Not sure what you mean by "VERY thin". Most safes use 12-gauge (0.104") steel for their bodies, as do the Browning safes. The premium Browning safes have 3/16" (0.1875") steel bodies; but then again, so are other safe makers' premium safes. With the Browning, you just pay more for the same features.

My only beef with Browning safes is their use of a glossy finish, which makes it high maintenance to keep it clean and expensive. Well, that and the fact that they put their hinges on the outside. To me, that's ugly and it's also a weakness although they do use bolts on the hinge side.

I prefer a matte finish, which costs less to make, and internal hinges. If you are concerned about body thickness, when you pay between $500 to $1000, you're most likely going to get a 12-gauge safe. When you go beyond that, you'll get a 3/16" (7-gauge) safe.

Absolutely agree on the importance of THICK steel.

However, while internal hinges may be prettier, they are actually less functional on a security safe. Just think about it, what type of hinges do you see on serious commercial safes or bank vaults? Internal hinges also prevent the door from opening all the way, and decrease usable space inside the safe. Here is a good summary of the issue:

http://www.6mmbr.com/gunsafes.html#hinges
Hinges--External vs. Internal
Recommendation: External hinges (provided safe is UL-rated 'RSC' or better.)

We prefer gun safes with external hinges. These allow the door to open wider, a full 180 degrees--something you will appreciate every time you open the safe. Additionally, external hinges allow the safe door to be removed for easier transport and servicing. Contrary to some marketing claims, internal hinges do not necessarily make the safe more "secure". Concealed internal hinges give a safe a sleeker, more modern appearance. But if a safe door has adequate locking bolts, the door will stay in place even if the hinges are cut completely off. And with either internal or external hinge design, it is the locking mechanism that is the real security concern.

Brown Safe Mfg., a highly respected manufacturer of commercial-grade safes (as well as residential safes), explains: "When shopping for a gun safe be aware of features that are only seen on 'gun safes' such as internal hinges, fire liners, etc., as they are usually marketing features more than safety features. It is often helpful to look at commercial safes to get an idea of how a safe, which is built for extremely high burglary risk, is constructed. For example, external hinges are a standard feature on commercial safes because the average burglar will waste time trying to cut or pry them. In any quality safe the hinges simply swing the door and shouldn't be part of the security of the safe. Internal hinges usually cause the burglar to immediately attack the lock and other vital areas on the safe."

Even better, make sure your safe is not visible... and get the ugliest most functional and most secure safe you can afford! :D

1-M-42
12-12-2010, 5:43 PM
I'm not affiliated in any way, just been doing tons of research prior to an upcoming purchase. Check out Sturdy Safe in Fresno, CA. 7 gauge steel, firewalls, you name it. They come in one color, gray. No fancy pin stripes, no polished brass, just one sturdy, studley, safe. Great prices as well.

Brown Safe
12-13-2010, 10:28 AM
Saw this pop up on a Google alert, thought I would join and post.

Here is a link to some very useful information that can help you make an educated safe purchase: http://www.brownsafe.com/categories/faq/faq.htm

Any safe should have a solid steel construction which includes the following: solid steel door, solid steel body, solid steel anti-pry jamb and solid steel locking bolts. Unfortunately many safes on the market today, although looking highly fortified and secure, have a very thin piece of sheet metal for the interior and exterior of the body and provide little to no burglary protection.

Here is a perfect example of one of these units:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nBhOjWHbD6M&feature=player_embedded

If you have any questions or need additional clarification, please feel free to call or e-mail anytime.

Thanks,

Matt C. Goldstein
Brown Safe Manufacturing, Inc.
"Built To A Higher Standard"
www.BrownSafe.com
matt@brownsafe.com
Office: 760-233-2293
Cell: 760-807-3752

bsg
12-13-2010, 3:19 PM
My only beef with Browning safes is their use of a glossy finish, which makes it high maintenance to keep it clean and expensive. Well, that and the fact that they put their hinges on the outside. To me, that's ugly and it's also a weakness although they do use bolts on the hinge side.




i prefer glossy finish and outside hinges.
to each his own.... :)

kermitz
12-13-2010, 3:37 PM
I was at Guns Fishing and Other Stuff in Vacaville looking at their browning safes and was wondering how people like them? How are they compared to Costco's Canon safes since Canon Safes are a third the price.

I really like the MOLLE system on the door Browning has so you can modify it anyway you want and store magazines and pistols there as well. Looking at the 24 gun safe.

Any advice,

Browning is a little more expensive but is it worth it over a cheaper safe like Canon (or another safe?)

Thier prices are way high. What price range and size are you looking for?

bsg
12-13-2010, 3:51 PM
i have an older (1970s) Browning ProSteel and it has served me well.

billped
12-13-2010, 4:20 PM
I recently purchased one of the less expensive Browning safes, a Theftgard, and am pleased. Perhaps I would have been more pleased with Winchester or Cannon, but I got what I got and I got no complaints.


Bill

Hot Brass
12-13-2010, 5:49 PM
NytWolf, I don`t know your age, to me it is simple, I like to keep what is mine. Ever been ripped off? Ever have any guns stolen from you? Ever had your car/truck broken into? I have experienced all of the above. Try to replace what is in your safe, it would not happen for me. I would be at a total loss.

I have been buying guns for over 3 decades, I have a bit invested in my purchases. Along with scales, powder measures, coins, papers, pass me downs, I hope you get the message. Just because a safe is offered in 12-gauge (0.104") steel for their bodies, as do the Browning safes, does not mean your valuables are very safe.

Thin is thin, my friend. The thicker the steel, the harder it is to be seperated from your property. I too had a Browning Pro Steel safe. The only thing Pro about the safe was the price. Gun safes were made with thicker steel until the price of steel went way way up. A safe with 10ga steel for a body that costs $900 today, was a $450 safe a few years ago. A safe with 1/4" steel body would cost you $900. I know because I bought one. I had the $ 1500 Browning Pro Steel that weighed 550#, sold it and bought a safe that has 1/4" body for $900, it weighes 1200# EMPTY.

I could push the walls of that Browning Pro Steel in and out. Just because sheet rock is placed next to the 10ga thin body does not make up for a lack of steel. Steel is security. The thicker the better.

Ever take a hammer or an axe to an old car? I have as a kid.


Does your house have rice paper walls?

Hot Brass
12-13-2010, 5:56 PM
Saw this pop up on a Google alert, thought I would join and post.

Here is a link to some very useful information that can help you make an educated safe purchase: http://www.brownsafe.com/categories/faq/faq.htm

Any safe should have a solid steel construction which includes the following: solid steel door, solid steel body, solid steel anti-pry jamb and solid steel locking bolts. Unfortunately many safes on the market today, although looking highly fortified and secure, have a very thin piece of sheet metal for the interior and exterior of the body and provide little to no burglary protection.

Here is a perfect example of one of these units:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nBhOjWHbD6M&feature=player_embedded

If you have any questions or need additional clarification, please feel free to call or e-mail anytime.

Thanks,

Matt C. Goldstein
Brown Safe Manufacturing, Inc.
"Built To A Higher Standard"
www.BrownSafe.com
matt@brownsafe.com
Office: 760-233-2293
Cell: 760-807-3752

I will be contacting you in the spring, as I need a larger safe. I like what I see.

bsg
12-13-2010, 6:39 PM
NytWolf, I don`t know your age, to me it is simple, I like to keep what is mine. Ever been ripped off? Ever have any guns stolen from you? Ever had your car/truck broken into? I have experienced all of the above. Try to replace what is in your safe, it would not happen for me. I would be at a total loss.

I have been buying guns for over 3 decades, I have a bit invested in my purchases. Along with scales, powder measures, coins, papers, pass me downs, I hope you get the message. Just because a safe is offered in 12-gauge (0.104") steel for their bodies, as do the Browning safes, does not mean your valuables are very safe.

Thin is thin, my friend. The thicker the steel, the harder it is to be seperated from your property. I too had a Browning Pro Steel safe. The only thing Pro about the safe was the price. Gun safes were made with thicker steel until the price of steel went way way up. A safe with 10ga steel for a body that costs $900 today, was a $450 safe a few years ago. A safe with 1/4" steel body would cost you $900. I know because I bought one. I had the $ 1500 Browning Pro Steel that weighed 550#, sold it and bought a safe that has 1/4" body for $900, it weighes 1200# EMPTY.

I could push the walls of that Browning Pro Steel in and out. Just because sheet rock is placed next to the 10ga thin body does not make up for a lack of steel. Steel is security. The thicker the better.

Ever take a hammer or an axe to an old car? I have as a kid.


Does your house have rice paper walls?


i like the older safes; brute strength, although i know the newer safes have better fire protection. i have read mixed reviews about the newer Browning safes but can't qualify their validity because i don't have one, nor have i done any research on them.
when i close the door on my old safe... it sounds like a heavy jail cell door closing.

Grakken
12-14-2010, 12:15 PM
My story. I own a Browning Medallion 28F (10 ga body). Bought it about 3.5 years ago. The Lock (S & G electronic) failed, not the electronic portion either, part of the mechanical portion of it. I cant explain it well enough but lets just say the lock was spinning in place and the deadbolt (lock) was not retracting (Please note this is different than the bolts that open close sealing the door to the body). The Smith that S & G sent to my house was a salty gentlemen. Real nice though, been in the business forever. I can tell he'd been doing this work forever. Both Browning/prosteel and s&G support were helpful and exhausted all known trick to remediate without resorting to drilling.

Long story short(er), he had to drill my safe. I resisted this option as long as I could but if I wanted in the safe, this was the last resort.. Drilling through my safe door wasn't that hard. With the proper bit, he was through the door, the hardplate AND the lock in i'd say 5-10 minutes (Tops). It still took him about 6 hours total to open my door AFTER the drilling. He had never had to drill a browning safe before. he had told me that he had gotten into cannons/liberty safes and a few other much more quickly (for what thats worth-) I like the technology browning puts into their door linkage. Even with the lock shaft drilled through we couldn't get the door open easily with the way the bolt (lock) sits. I wont divulge it here but as it was explained to me, most others do it differently.

Browning/pro-steel was NOT going to replace my door, nor was S&G. Luckily the hole isn't visible and it was filled in (more like super jammed in) with a ball bearing and some epoxy-like material.

No doubt that if a determined thief with technical know-how wants in YOUR gun safe, he's getting in with the proper tools. However, sitting in their watching this vet pull his hair out trying to open the door was interesting. This guy had all the tools too. Fiber optics, hardened bits, drills etc... of course it took him a long(er) time because i wanted as limited damage to the rest of my safe as possible.

In the end, I think if a thief with technical know-how wants into my safe that badly, just bring a couple of big friends and brute force your way in through the side. Will be much faster than going in through the door and doing it H.E.A.T finesse style.

Now, not sure how hard it is to hack 10 gauge steel, never tried it but it cant be fun (im sure its doable though)...and will produce a lot of noise. More steel, the heavier and more expensive the safe will be.

I looked into Sturdy's because they use heavier gauge (like 7 or 8) but fire protection was extra...and i didnt want to mess with having to hire another company to move it into my house. I like the look of Browning safes, nice high gloss finishes (one reason why costs a lil more). My kid also likes the way it looks and she is constantly putting her grubby fingerprints on it (she is 3) but she always gets a pass.:D

My only regret is not having the money to buy a bigger browning. I think the technology that goes into the door/security is higher/better than the tech that goes into a lot of other doors. You may have a different opinon but that is mine.

P.S- Since this was a lock failure, S&G paid for all repairs. It cost me zero dollars out of pocket...Just my time.

bsg
12-14-2010, 1:18 PM
i prefer manual combination locks and have one on my safe.

Brown Safe
12-16-2010, 2:21 PM
Hot Brass: Sounds good, please contact me anytime with questions.

Thanks,

Matt