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View Full Version : any jet-skiers out there?


shooterx10
07-06-2006, 12:14 PM
I have tried several jet skis before, a Sea-Doo and a few Kawasakis (a 900 and a 1100). I might look into getting one (or two), but what's the cost of one plus a trailer. In Northern Cal, which large bodies of water they allow them? I don't want to run them in the Bay because I'll have to flush out the salt water after every run to prevent corrosion. Can they be run in the Sacto delta? Also, where can I rent storage space for them?

Any help or even pics of your jet-ski will be greatly appreciated.

bootcamp
07-06-2006, 1:56 PM
Get them used. Usually half price or less. Get the owner to test them in the water. Lots of places still allow them especially in the valley, lakes and reservoirs. Call the places you want to visit and ask what their rules are for jetskis.

I would never buy a new jetski. Too much depreciation and too much for a weekend user. It's gonna sit at least 300 days out of the 365 day calendar year unless you live on the lake.

ke6guj
07-06-2006, 1:57 PM
I don't want to run them in the Bay because I'll have to flush out the salt water after every run to prevent corrosion.

Any help or even pics of your jet-ski will be greatly appreciated.

I haven't ridden for years, and my riding was in SoCal. However, salt-water usage is not a big deal. Yes, you do have to flush it out afterwords, but it isn't a big deal.

What I would do when I was going ocean riding, is to first coat down the metal components and electronics with a spray lubricant. Then, after you are done, you just wash it down real good inside and out. And spray everything with the lube again. As for flushing out the engine, I used "salt-away" hooked up to the hose to flush out the engine. We used to go to Catalina all the time, or go wave-jumping off of Camp Pendelton. As long as you do the maintanence it isn't a big deal.

One other way to flush out the engine is to go to a fresh-water lake after the ocean-riding and go play for another half-hour or so. The engine should be pretty much cleared out of any salt. You still would need to wash down the rest of the boat to get rid of any salt.

edit: +1 on bootcamp's advice. There are $$$ benefits to going used. And, the first year or so, you may go every weekend, then to some people it becomes a pain. Renting is a good idea, if you won't be going all the time.

Inkman
07-06-2006, 3:19 PM
I'm good for renting one once (twice at most) a year at Tahoe. After an hour of hard riding i am one beat up puppy. Can't imagine owning one cuz i know it wouldn't get used that much.

On a side note, last year about an hour into it at Tahoe, i got tossed. Don't ask me how, but let me tell you, that 10 or 15 yard swim was the longest of my life, even with a Mae West on and climbing back on the Seadoo was no easy chore. Best shades i ever owned are now at the bottom of that lake. Guess i'm a litterbug now? :cool:

Al

bootcamp
07-06-2006, 3:26 PM
Damn, isn't Lake Tahoe still ice cold during the summer?

wonder9
07-08-2006, 2:12 AM
Cleaning up a pwc after running it in salt water isn't that bad, I've been running mine for the last 5 years only in salt water, and there is no salt corrosion anywhere on it. It takes me about 1.5 - 2 hours to clean it and my equipment at the end of a day riding it. Another thing you might want to check is if any fresh water riding areas in your location is planning on phasing out two stroke jet skis, if so, you'll either have to buy a four stroke or plan on going out on the ocean anyway.

You can pick up a good used pwc with a trailer and spare equipment for under $4k. Getting insurance is about $150 a year for liability only. Another $50 if you want a Vessel Assist plan in case you break down on the water. Registration runs me about $30 for two years, another $15 for a 5 year PITI tag for the trailer. I have a Yamaha XL760 which is a 3-seater. Very dependable, a good stable platform on rough water. At W.O.T. I'll burn 13 gallons of gas in about 1.5 hours, cruising along at 30 - 35 mph lets me go for about 4 hours.

A good source to check for used skis is www.boattraderonline.com. There is a link to NADA which is like a "blue book" guide on boats. Another good website is www.americajetskiing.com There will be links on where to ride in your area, and if there are any clubs close by. ( you can pick up a lot of good information calling up a club and talking to some of the members, they may even take you out on different models to give you a feel for them, and turn you on to any good deals they might know of. )The pwcs can be stored at any yard that takes Rv's, they don't take up much more room than a regular parking lot space.

Inkman
07-08-2006, 8:57 AM
Damn, isn't Lake Tahoe still ice cold during the summer?

You acclimate real fast to the cold water. It's really not that bad.

Al

Blue
07-08-2006, 1:10 PM
I'd look into getting a used Kawasaki. My buddy had a newer Sea Doo and a Kawasaki and the SD was nothing but problems. The Kawasaki started every time and ran forever. The SD was always in the shop.

ke6guj
07-08-2006, 10:30 PM
You acclimate real fast to the cold water. It's really not that bad.

Al

Yup, once the junk turns into a hairy walnut, its all good. Just takes a good long hot shower to return to normal:D :D

Rob454
07-28-2006, 1:49 PM
My jet skis were ridden about 95% of the time in salt water and I dare you to find a speck of rust or corrosion on them.http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y152/Rob454/IMG_0203.jpg

http://server1.sbtontheweb.com/forum/showthread.php?t=13975

Go to this website. i wrote a article on what to look for when buyng a used jet ski, pre ride and post ride things to do
Rob