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View Full Version : Any one here tried an SSD yet?


norcal77
11-26-2010, 11:44 PM
So I needed a new hard drive and was looking at my options and came across this SSD type drive that they have out now. It was $100 for a 40GB drive as opposed to the 2TB I could have gotten instead. I don't typically keep lots of data and only use my PC for surfing and stuff so I figured I'd give it a shot..

It is a pretty cool device...so far what I have noticed...

-Windows boots in less than 10 seconds, from turn on until the desktop is ready
-It's extremely quiet (no moving parts), it's kind of strange watching that drive light go crazy on the PC and not hearing a single sound

All in all, I like it. If you plan on replacing your boot drive one day I'd highly recommend it, boot times are insanely fast as opposed to the older style drives.

I bought the 40GB Intel one but I hear Kingston makes a good drive also..

stphnman20
11-27-2010, 12:04 AM
SSD = Solid State Drive

It's pretty much the same memory as the one the the Ipods have. Getting one for my Macbook for Xmas. It cost an arm and leg but I think it's well worth it.

Merc1138
11-27-2010, 1:30 AM
Yes windows boots fast(then again, I rarely turn my computers off anyway, most of the time they're just in sleep mode, so I'm still in windows within 10 seconds of pressing a button on the keyboard.

Yes, they're fast drives and great for laptops because of the lack of moving parts.

However, SSDs aren't something I'd buy for a desktop computer due to cost. Still not under $1.50 per GB(I don't plan on buying for my main desktop till it's more like $1/GB). The storage capacity still sucks unless you're willing to pay astronomical amounts.

For a laptop they're great, for a desktop, still needs a year or two.

PS, those hybrid seagate drives are garbage unless all you like to do is run benchmarks all day.

den888
11-27-2010, 7:52 AM
I have heard that they have a limited read/write cycle, which may contribute to a higher failure rate than HD's. But, the technology is relatively new compared with HD's, so the data may be insufficient to show anything significant.

I have one in a Dell netbook and it has performed well so far (since Feb 2009).

DiscoBayJoe
11-27-2010, 8:06 AM
I went SSD a year ago and would never go back. There are a couple of OS tweaks you can make that will really make it fly.

Gundam
11-27-2010, 8:41 AM
Easily the best performance value for computers. People spend hundreds of dollars to get a few hundred mhz difference, a few more gb of ram, or on aftermarket cooling so they can OC their chips, yet none will provide a dramatic difference like going from a conventional platter HDD to an SSD. The difference is night and day. My crappy netbook with its piss poor cpu will boot up windows and open programs in half the time of my my i3 based desktop running a 7200rpm HDD.

Nose Nuggets
11-27-2010, 8:49 AM
There is a pretty wide range of performance on the SSD's right now. Intel seems to have the best ones (although i cant remember the model) while some SSD's have performance below that of a conventional platter and head drive.

We started ordering laptops with SSD when they started coming out and they have been consistently better. My boss' laptop and a few we got for one of our larger clients have been really good. Its pretty much any seek operation is drastically faster (for obvious reasons). so your scheduled AV scans run faster, defrags, searches, booting, etc.

In most computer systems these days the largest restriction to performance for common tasks is the speed of the drive. the fact that they even sell 5400 RPM 2.5" drives is a damn travesty.

For desktops and servers i would recommend a SSD for the OS and do conventional platter/head drives for storage. in my home desktop i have a WD Raptor drive and a few 1TB's. 40-60 gigs is just to damn small for my home computer so the Raptor was a really good alternative. almost as fast, but 300 gigs.

Mute
11-27-2010, 9:07 AM
I've been using one for a while now. I will never go back to conventional hard drives as my primary. I only use platter drives now for storage.

TonyM
11-27-2010, 11:13 AM
I went SSD a year ago and would never go back. There are a couple of OS tweaks you can make that will really make it fly.

+1

I run two mid-speed 128GB SSDs in RAID0 for my boot partition on Win7 and it screams.

Boots are fast and Windows reports it's pretty good too.

http://www.picturesbytony.com/i7_score.png

sfwdiy
11-27-2010, 4:48 PM
I'll probably be throwing an SSD in my Macbook Pro shortly. I'm also thinking about pulling the optical drive and throwing another hard drive in there instead. SSD for OS/Apps, HDD for data storage.

--B

JDay
11-27-2010, 9:47 PM
Easily the best performance value for computers. People spend hundreds of dollars to get a few hundred mhz difference, a few more gb of ram, or on aftermarket cooling so they can OC their chips, yet none will provide a dramatic difference like going from a conventional platter HDD to an SSD. The difference is night and day. My crappy netbook with its piss poor cpu will boot up windows and open programs in half the time of my my i3 based desktop running a 7200rpm HDD.

An i3 isn't exactly a fast CPU, in fact it is a low end CPU.

JDay
11-27-2010, 9:49 PM
Its pretty much any seek operation is drastically faster (for obvious reasons). so your scheduled AV scans run faster, defrags, searches, booting, etc.

You should never defrag a SSD, for one thing it is not needed and for another it will decrease the drives life.

SikDMAX
11-27-2010, 10:00 PM
Im on the hunt for a crazy Cyber Monday deal on a nice SSD around 100GB or so. I just bought a 2TB HD for $59.99 shipped for all my music and data, but this will be, as mentioned by others, for the OS and programs.


I went SSD a year ago and would never go back. There are a couple of OS tweaks you can make that will really make it fly.

What mods are these? Id like to do them.

norcal77
11-28-2010, 5:15 PM
I went SSD a year ago and would never go back. There are a couple of OS tweaks you can make that will really make it fly.

Please share these OS tweaks, if they are the ones I'm thinking of you need Windows 7 and I'm still on XP. I'm probably going to upgrade soon but any tips would be appreciated..

norcal77
11-28-2010, 5:21 PM
I have heard that they have a limited read/write cycle, which may contribute to a higher failure rate than HD's.

I read the same thing also but instead of relying on tests I decided to try it myself, I honestly don't notice any kind of limitations...

I did read earlier models of the solid state drives that used the Jmicron controller had major "stuttering" issues but supposedly that has been tuned out and it should be good to go..

norcal77
11-28-2010, 5:22 PM
You should never defrag a SSD, for one thing it is not needed and for another it will decrease the drives life.

Thanks for the tip, my Norton Security suite has Disk optimization set to run all time, I'll be sure to turn that off.

JDay
11-28-2010, 7:26 PM
I read the same thing also but instead of relying on tests I decided to try it myself, I honestly don't notice any kind of limitations...

The eeprom that is written to will wear out after so many write cycles. This is a known fact with SSDs and the reason why they ship with extra sectors on them (sectors that are going bad get copied to one of the extras then marked bad). I would highly recommend placing the swap file on a platter based drive, or disabling it all together if you have enough ram.

norcal77
11-28-2010, 7:40 PM
The eeprom that is written to will wear out after so many write cycles. This is a known fact with SSDs and the reason why they ship with extra sectors on them (sectors that are going bad get copied to one of the extras then marked bad). I would highly recommend placing the swap file on a platter based drive, or disabling it all together if you have enough ram.

Should 3GB of physical RAM be enough to disable the pagefile?

Mute
11-28-2010, 7:45 PM
Should 3GB of physical RAM be enough to disable the pagefile?

I wouldn't turn it off with less than 8GB, but that's just me. If you have a platter drive for storage, use it for your pagefile. That's what I've done with my system and it works just fine.

JDay
11-28-2010, 9:28 PM
I wouldn't turn it off with less than 8GB, but that's just me. If you have a platter drive for storage, use it for your pagefile. That's what I've done with my system and it works just fine.

It shouldn't be a problem with 4GB.

Gundam
12-03-2010, 7:23 PM
An i3 isn't exactly a fast CPU, in fact it is a low end CPU.

For booting up windows, there will be little difference between an I3 and an I7. Don't let the dirt cheap price fool you. It's a very cable cpu. But compared to a celeron equipped netbook, that's a different story. There IS a noticeable difference between the two for booting windows and opening programs. With an SSD the celeron absolutely smokes the I3.

nick
12-03-2010, 7:52 PM
I've wanted to go SSD for a while now, but three things still prevent me from doing so:

1. Lack of drives with FDE.
2. Uncertainty about the max number of write cycles (time will tell that one).
3. Price (although that one may become a non-issue if the other two are dealt with).

The older laptops at work that we put SSD drives in now run as fast, or often faster than their newer counterparts with conventional platter drives.

Falstaff
12-09-2010, 5:31 PM
Still not as fast as my WD Raptors in RAID 0...

My partner's an Electrical Engineer, he says flash memory has a life span of 1,000 reads/writes per bit and then they start "wearing out" are SSD's flash based?

Dunno' if that's still true.

TonyM
12-09-2010, 5:40 PM
Still not as fast as my WD Raptors in RAID 0...

My partner's an Electrical Engineer, he says flash memory has a life span of 1,000 reads/writes per bit and then they start "wearing out" are SSD's flash based?

Dunno' if that's still true.

They are generally guaranteed for a minimum of 100,000 writes per page or block, but wear leveling algorithms in the controllers make sure that you're never pounding the same pages/blocks all the time. This increases the lifespan significantly.

It's really not an issue.

My Raptors sit in my drawer, I do not miss the sound of them spinning or accessing.

TonyM
12-09-2010, 5:49 PM
The eeprom that is written to will wear out after so many write cycles. This is a known fact with SSDs and the reason why they ship with extra sectors on them (sectors that are going bad get copied to one of the extras then marked bad). I would highly recommend placing the swap file on a platter based drive, or disabling it all together if you have enough ram.

The concept you are referring to came from Hard drives first, it's not just on NAND Flash. This is done so that IF a block (minimum size that can be marked bad) is determined to have failed a spare can be swapped in and the volume size will not change. It applies to hard drives as well, but on the sector level with hard drives.

I agree about the pagefile/swapfile. Disable it if you have the memory in Windows, or put it on a real HDD if you must, just because.