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View Full Version : Just Inherited Remington 1917 *UPDATED WITH PICS*


offrdmania
11-23-2010, 6:47 PM
So I just found out that when my Grandfather died in 1990 that he left me his Remington US 1917 Rifle. Its a pretty low serial number (126332). I just found this out because at the time I was only 13 and my dad didnt think I was old enough to be shooting 30-06. So long story short it was packed away at my aunts and forgotten about until yesterday when she found it and told me. Im heading down to the parents tomorrow for the holiday and I will then be united with my new rifle. If there is anything you can tell me about it I would appreciate it. I will post pictures when I get home on Friday.

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c305/offrdmania/1917013.jpg
http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c305/offrdmania/1917003.jpg
http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c305/offrdmania/1917009.jpg
http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c305/offrdmania/1917011.jpg
http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c305/offrdmania/1917004.jpg
http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c305/offrdmania/1917012.jpg

mosinnagantm9130
11-23-2010, 7:10 PM
M1917's are cock-on-close, just like other Enfields.

They are also heavy, almost as much as a Garand.

Have fun with the new rifle!!:D

swifty
11-23-2010, 7:19 PM
Here is some info; M1917 Enfield (http://www.highspeedlane.net/m1917/index.html)

AngryPossum
11-23-2010, 7:30 PM
:Ivan:....just kidding. Always wanted one. Can't wait to see pics. I believe more U.S soldiers carried the M1917 then the Springfield 1903 during WW1....don't quote me though.

offrdmania
11-23-2010, 8:14 PM
Talking to my mom its sounds as if its been sporterized. Its ok though, it was my grandfathers and ill never get rid of it. I would like to get it back to its original military configuration though

gunboat
11-23-2010, 10:13 PM
Don't sweat it being sporterized -- Likely it will cost a ton to try to make it "original" - depending on how sporterized it is. They are great shooters, enjoy it as granpa did. Remingtons have no issues.
my ha-penny

rojocorsa
11-23-2010, 11:00 PM
M1917's are cock-on-close, just like other Enfields.

They are also heavy, almost as much as a Garand.

Have fun with the new rifle!!:D

Never having seen one up close, how similar is the action to a real Lee-Enfield? I mean, besides cock on close...

mosinnagantm9130
11-23-2010, 11:07 PM
Never having seen one up close, how similar is the action to a real Lee-Enfield? I mean, besides cock on close...

Other than the cock on close, the only thing similar to an Enfield is the safety. The bolt is a mauser-ish bolt. The floorplate and magazine design is also extremely similar to the mauser.

freonr22
11-24-2010, 12:07 AM
tagged for pics!

offrdmania
11-24-2010, 5:38 AM
She sent me a rough pic on the phone and it looks as if everything is there except for the bayo lug and the stock was cut down. So im guessing I would need to find a bayo lug and an original full length stock with hardware. It still retains the front sight and it looks as if the barrel is full length.

smle-man
11-24-2010, 6:58 AM
Easy to restore!

offrdmania
11-24-2010, 7:55 AM
Can anyone point me in the direction of a full length stock? There is one on the broker but it is beat to hell. I would like to find one in decent condition. Doesnt have to be perfect but preferably without missing chunks of wood from it. lol

swifty
11-24-2010, 8:10 AM
See if the rear sight ears are still there, without them complete restoration is not doable.

Cowboy T
11-25-2010, 10:44 AM
If there is anything you can tell me about it I would appreciate it. I will post pictures when I get home on Friday.

Those rifles suck for accuracy and are unsafe. You should not even think about shooting it. As a fellow CalGuns member, I will graciously offer to help you out and get rid of that dangerous thing for you, free of charge.

:D

If I knew you better (or at all), I'd hate your guts. Congratulations! You're going to love that rifle. And yes, you could've easily shot .30-06 back then, if there were handloading equipment handy. Downloaded .30-06 rounds have taken lots of small game.

Saigon1965
11-25-2010, 11:48 AM
For the stock - Try Sarco - Numrich or best yet Gunbroker -

offrdmania
11-25-2010, 2:09 PM
Well, I have the rifle in front of me as I type this. The ears are still in tact and from just looking it over it seems as if everything is here other than a full length stock and bayo lug. Its unfortunate that this stock was cut down. The finish on this stock is beautiful. I will be home tomorrow and I will take detailed pictures. The barrel is stamped 1-18 with a large R along with an R on the front sight and two E's on the bolt, one on the bolt handle and the other on the back side of the bolt. Eddystone? There are cartouches all over the barrel which im guessing are arsenal marks. Have a Happy Thanksgiving and ill be back tomorrow

Anubis Laughed
11-26-2010, 12:48 PM
Congrats, you'll really enjoy owning and shooting an M1917 rifle. I used to own one myself, before I got hooked on Lee-Enfields and Martini-Henrys :)
They're fantastic shooters, and excellent battle rifles.

Yes, the "E" stamp indicates those parts were made at the Eddystone Arsenal (Really just a second manufactuing plant owned, set up, and operated by Remington.)

Due to the Springfield & Rock Island Armories never really being able to ramp upM1903 production to meet the war demand, so something like 2 out of every 3 American Doughboys in WW1 were actually armed with M1917's and not the M1903. Most famous was Sgt. York, who used one when he won his medal of honor (and not a 1903, as shown in the film).

After the war, most were placed into storage as strategic reserve. When the US enetred WW2, many of them were arsenal overhauled, at which time parts from different makers were mixed (Remington, Eddystone, & Winchester). At the time of course, no one worried or cared about which parts were used on which rifle. only that the rifle met specs and was ready for use in combat.

I can recommend Charles Stratton's book in the 'For Collectors Only' series, "The Pattern 1914 & US Model 1917 Rifles", as a great and inexpensive way to learn about your rifle, and decide what parts you need to rebuild, before you begin restoration. He breaks the rifle down part by part, and you can know what to look for before you buy.

:D

offrdmania
11-26-2010, 7:07 PM
Updated with pics

Dubious_Beans
11-26-2010, 7:44 PM
Nice!

I've got one too. Yep, it was grandpa's hunting rifle. :)

Sporterized, but...

http://www.weirdstuffwemake.com/blackhole/images/model_1917_459.jpg

Full Clip
11-26-2010, 7:53 PM
I got my grandfather's as well, also sportered.
Nice club we have going!
I'll have to post pics.

smle-man
11-26-2010, 11:11 PM
Nice!

I've got one too. Yep, it was grandpa's hunting rifle. :)

Sporterized, but...

http://www.weirdstuffwemake.com/blackhole/images/model_1917_459.jpg

Interesting, your rifle has the front band from a Springfield M1922 .22 rifle or an NRA sporter on it as well as an 03 front sight and 03A3 rear sight.

GuyW
11-27-2010, 12:21 AM
I think NRA and/or DCM sold target rifles like this one for High Power competition that were armory-modified, not bubba-sporterized (I have an 03-A3).....but I can't point you toward any source to verify it. IMHO, those rifles are some type of "original" configuration.
.

offrdmania
11-27-2010, 4:40 AM
I got lucky with mine that none of the metal was modified. A new stock and bayo lug and im good to go in getting it back to its former Military glory

jms
11-27-2010, 7:36 AM
I got lucky with mine that none of the metal was modified. A new stock and bayo lug and im good to go in getting it back to its former Military glory
With that, it's easy to restore and worth it more being Remington. As for parts, as stated above.

offrdmania
11-27-2010, 8:02 AM
Does anyone know if there were factory scopes or scope mounts for these rifles in WW1?

jms
11-27-2010, 8:26 AM
Does anyone know if there were factory scopes or scope mounts for these rifles in WW1?
Oh no, you don't want to go there

offrdmania
11-27-2010, 8:31 AM
Why not, if there is then id like to find a period scope as well. BTW, you said dont go there but then look at your signature line. lol

jms
11-27-2010, 9:43 AM
Why not, if there is then id like to find a period scope as well. BTW, you said dont go there but then look at your signature line. lolThe sig picture is original as issued. As for M17 it will never be as issued if you provide scope with it. You'll be putting a couple of hundred for at least a $500 gun to make it around $200 gun if your lucky.

offrdmania
11-27-2010, 10:40 AM
Maybe you didnt understand my request JMS. Period means from then, Im not looking for a current scope mount or scope. Im looking for one that was issued with the rifle or was from the period (circa 1917).

Milsurp Collector
11-27-2010, 11:35 AM
Does anyone know if there were factory scopes or scope mounts for these rifles in WW1?

Maybe you didnt understand my request JMS. Period means from then, Im not looking for a current scope mount or scope. Im looking for one that was issued with the rifle or was from the period (circa 1917).

There was an experimental M1917 sniper with a prismatic telescope, but it never went beyond a couple of prototypes. The M1903 was used for sniper work in World War I.

TRAP55
11-27-2010, 11:38 AM
The rear sight ears have been milled off, you can't hurt any value putting a scope on it.
After the war, Remington had a pile of actions left over. They became the Remington Model 30, might search for that mount.
http://www.imfdb.org/images/thumb/2/2f/RemingtonModel30.jpg/400px-RemingtonModel30.jpg

offrdmania
11-27-2010, 11:59 AM
My rifle still has the ears

TRAP55
11-27-2010, 3:31 PM
My rifle still has the ears
My bad, I was looking at the pics of the one Dubious_Beans posted.:o

blu97
11-27-2010, 6:58 PM
Go to springfield sporters, for a little extra they will sell you all the remington parts you need.

OHOD
11-27-2010, 8:46 PM
M1917's are cock-on-close, just like other Enfields.

They are also heavy, almost as much as a Garand.

Have fun with the new rifle!!:D

Okay, I'm not even going to describe what I saw when I Googled "cock on close".

I was looking for the term to determine if there was some sort of cocking significance when chambering a round.

I was sadly, sadly mistaken.

So.
I have to ask "What does cock-on-close" mean with regards to the Enfield 1917?

Seriously. Please explain.

offrdmania
11-28-2010, 5:50 AM
When you close the bolt, the firing pin automatically cocks. Close the bolt, pull the trigger

jamesob
11-28-2010, 8:17 AM
its not all remington, it has some eddystone parts on her. as for stocks boyds make new semi inlet one for 99.00

Milsurp Collector
11-28-2010, 9:14 AM
I was looking for the term to determine if there was some sort of cocking significance when chambering a round.

So.
I have to ask "What does cock-on-close" mean with regards to the Enfield 1917?



Bolt-action rifles either cock the firing pin when the bolt is opened (Mauser and clones like the M1903, Mosin Nagant) or when the bolt is closed (Lee Enfield, M1917, Arisaka).

Dubious_Beans
11-28-2010, 9:58 AM
Bolt-action rifles either cock the firing pin when the bolt is opened (Mauser and clones like the M1903, Mosin Nagant) or when the bolt is closed (Lee Enfield, M1917, Arisaka).

Is there an advantage to one method vs the other?

TRAP55
11-28-2010, 10:04 AM
With cock on opening, you have the leverage of the bolt handle to cock the firing pin spring.
There's a cock on opening conversion for just about all of em, but I've never seen one that worked worth a spit.

liketoshoot
11-28-2010, 10:15 AM
Okay, I'm not even going to describe what I saw when I Googled "cock on close".
I was looking for the term to determine if there was some sort of cocking significance when chambering a round.

I was sadly, sadly mistaken.

So.
I have to ask "What does cock-on-close" mean with regards to the Enfield 1917?

Seriously. Please explain.

Thank you for the best laugh I've had this weekend!!

OHOD
11-28-2010, 11:02 AM
Thank you for the best laugh I've had this weekend!!

Glad you had a good laugh, I did as well.

Thanks to those that explained "cock-on-close". I have a Mosin, so now I know what the term means.
For some reason I thought "close" was referring to being near something.

(this should get another laugh)

offrdmania
11-28-2010, 11:12 AM
its not all remington, it has some eddystone parts on her. as for stocks boyds make new semi inlet one for 99.00

I looked at Boyds and they are only 90% finished, you have to finish sanding them, shaping them and finish them. Im going to look for an original take-off stock.

Milsurp Collector
11-28-2010, 1:07 PM
Is there an advantage to one method vs the other?

With cock-on-closing bolts the only force resisting the opening of the bolt is the friction of the fired brass. Since the operator is not cocking the firing pin when opening the bolt it can mean faster and easier opening and extraction. If you have ever experienced "Mosin sticky bolt syndrome" you can appreciate that it would be easier to get the bolt open if you weren't also working against the resistance of the firing pin spring.

The British believed cock-on-closing led to faster overall bolt cycling and firing:

HV5pSUlBz18&rel=0

The 1895 Mauser was cock-on-closing and the bolts influenced by it (Arisaka and P14/M1917) are also cock-on-closing.

When Paul Mauser designed the 1898 model bolt he switched to cock-on-opening. Since the bolt was cocked by opening it lead to faster and easier chambering and closing of the bolt. The Mauser 1898 design was widely used and copied, modern bolt-action rifles included, so it is what most people are used to using.

haf9QURxO4E&rel=0

mosinnagantm9130
11-28-2010, 6:37 PM
Okay, I'm not even going to describe what I saw when I Googled "cock on close".

I was looking for the term to determine if there was some sort of cocking significance when chambering a round.

I was sadly, sadly mistaken.


:rofl: ^^I was tempted to sig that.