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Veggie
11-07-2010, 5:17 PM
Anyone got this? I was looking at it and very interested.

Satex
11-07-2010, 7:04 PM
As far as I understand Sony is about to come out with a few models supporting it, and Logitech has a box coming out. Haven't heard reviews of it yet.

JDay
11-07-2010, 8:33 PM
The Logitech box has been out for a while now.

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Companion-Google-Keyboard-Controller/dp/B0040QE98O

uzigalil
11-07-2010, 8:40 PM
Sony and logitechs google tv products have been out for weeks, I dont like sonys integration and there remote is ridiculous also the google tv software is overly complicated I also think there overpriced, logitech is better but again Ill pass, its a work in progress much like the android phone, the first android phone the g1 sucked but they have come a long way in a short 2 years.

So in summary I think the roku box is the best bet but if you need or want I tunes integration then apple tv is great also, and well see but boxee is coming soon also.

Veggie
11-07-2010, 9:42 PM
I think I will wait a year to see them really get it clean and then try it.

jmlivingston
11-24-2010, 6:27 AM
What about the Boxee Box? It's not a Google TV product, but it competes in that same market I believe.

tacticalcity
11-24-2010, 9:51 AM
I find the products designed to do what you are trying to do to be very limited in functionality.

Instead, I have a PC running Windows 7 hooked upto every TV in the home. One of them has a massive hard drive with just under 4000 movies and tv show episodes. The built in Media Center software makes accessing that content a pleasure. Plus I have access to the web so Hulu, Netflix, and similar websites are just as easy to access as they are a computer using a normal monitor. Media Center has TIVO functionality built right in. I have a wireless keyboard and mouse hooked up to each of them in addition to windows remote for browsing the web. So in addition to watching videos I can browse the net, update facebook, check my email, play the latest video games (Call of Duty anyone) in every room right on my TV. You name it, I can do it. Hassle free.

People are always amazed by how I have my home network setup. People come over just to play with it. I would have a hard time getting by without it. I am completely addicted to having access to a massive resource of entertainment available to me. It is easy as pie, and very fun!

If I even remotely liked a movie, I have it. If I enjoy a TV show, I have every episode. If I have a favorite audio book, its there. Favorite song, there. If enjoy a video game, it is there too. In every room of the house, organized in an easy to navigate way exactly the same on each system. So I never have trouble finding what I want. All the media is really stored on just one computer and streamed through my home network. But Media Center on each system organizes it for me so that it is as if that file is on the computer I am using. Video games I have to install on each machine, because they are a lot more complicated than video and audio files. But I take the time to organize them exactly the same on each machine so I can find them without issue.

WHAT YOU NEED TO HOOK A COMPUTER UP TO YOUR TV AND TAKE FULL ADVANTAGE OF IT...

- A computer capable of running either vista home premium (or higher) or windows 7 home premium (or higher). I have found most P4 systems a little too sluggish for this, but most Duo systems and higher have always worked great. One of my systems I found on ebay for $88 and it works great. It is not the one I use as the server or play most of my games on, but it runs media center perfectly and streams my media without issue.
- A video card with at least 64mb on board memory and DVI output (better than SVideo or RCA options big time), some cards even have HDMI out which works great as well but DVI works just as well.
- A TV with either HDMI or DVI Inputs (any HDTV flat screen will have HDMI inputs)
- A DVI to HDMI cable, very easy to find.
- An audio cable with the PC style audio jack on one end and RCA outs on the other, unless your card supports HDMI audio out.
- A video capture card, internal cards work much better than USB 2.0 external options in my experience.
- A really large hard drive to store all your movies, games, etc. on one machine, the others will simply share/stream most of that content.
- An internet connection.
- A windows remote
- A wireless keyboard and mouse

IF YOU WANT TO DO ONE COMPUTER PER TV YOU NEED...

Large video files work better if you have a wired network, but will work on a wireless as well with only a few hickups here and there.

- Router
- Lots of really long Cat-5 cable

GP3
11-24-2010, 10:00 AM
I find the products designed to do what you are trying to do to be very limited in functionality.

Instead, I have a PC running Windows 7 hooked upto every TV in the home. One of them has a massive hard drive with just under 4000 movies and tv show episodes. The built in Media Center software makes accessing that content a pleasure. Plus I have access to the web so Hulu, Netflix, and similar websites are just as easy to access as they are a computer using a normal monitor. Media Center has TIVO functionality built right in. I have a wireless keyboard and mouse hooked up to each of them in addition to windows remote for browsing the web. So in addition to watching videos I can browse the net, update facebook, check my email, play the latest video games (Call of Duty anyone) in every room right on my TV. You name it, I can do it. Hassle free.

People are always amazed by how I have my home network setup. People come over just to play with it. I would have a hard time getting by without it. I am completely addicted to having access to a massive resource of entertainment available to me.

If I even remotely liked a movie, I have it. If I enjoy a TV show, I have every episode. If I have a favorite audio book, its there. If enjoy a video game, it is there too. In every room of the house, organized in an easy to navigate way exactly the same on each system. So I never have trouble finding what I want.

Some people can only comprehend 'plug and play'. Gtv, Atv, Boxee, etc. is for the people that don't have the tech knowledge you have.

Hitman
11-24-2010, 10:03 AM
I just bought a Samsung 7000 series 55". It uses DLNA networking so as soon as I got it hooked up to my wireless network. I just shared my movies folder on my main computer and I am streaming movies to my TV.

Also has widgets and many cool internet apps.

Rhythm of Life
11-24-2010, 10:07 AM
Some people can only comprehend 'plug and play'. Gtv, Atv, Boxee, etc. is for the people that don't have the tech knowledge you have.

A couple hours researching and you can do that yourself, its not hard to do.

tacticalcity
11-24-2010, 10:24 AM
Some people can only comprehend 'plug and play'. Gtv, Atv, Boxee, etc. is for the people that don't have the tech knowledge you have.

Honestly, it is more lack of awareness that is possible.

Buy a computer today and odds are it is already equiped to do this.

Hooking up 2 cables and double clicking on the media center icon is no more complicated than the options you mentioned. That is as plug and play as it gets. Media Center is super simple. The easiest to setup, use and navigate that I have ever seen. Easier to setup and use than TIVO.

It is simply a question of marketing. Windows is not doing enough to educate people that this is possible.

My list above is more for people who want to do it on the cheap with something laying around, or something that is a steel of a deal on ebay. Not every old computer laying around the home is pre-equiped to do this. But 95% of the ones in the stores are.

If you bought a computer or laptop in the last 3 years...odds are it will do it...and figuring it out will be just as easy as Boxee.

FastFinger
11-24-2010, 12:22 PM
Instead, I have a PC running Windows 7 hooked upto every TV in the home.

Sounds like the way to go - if you know what you're doing (I sometimes do - sometimes not).

Do you leave every system run 24/7? How do you deal with the system noise - fans etc? What do you do for file back up?

gunn
11-24-2010, 1:07 PM
Sounds like the way to go - if you know what you're doing (I sometimes do - sometimes not).

Do you leave every system run 24/7? How do you deal with the system noise - fans etc? What do you do for file back up?

* I don't leave my home theater PC (HTPC) on all the time; it's on whenever I need it.

* Videos are primarily streamed from my 24/7 on server. RAID on the server solves my backup problem. Games are installed locally.

* There's a whole cottage industry around minimizing noise in a fairly high performance system. For my case:
- I looked for a "home theater" looking chassis that could accomodate 120mm fans (selected for low noise) + installed a few fan controllers (essentially variable resistors).
- Airflow is straight through the case front-to-back and is nearly inaudible a few feet away from the case. It flows across the HDD, through the big heatsink tower, and out the back.
- The HDD is suspended in webbing (doesn't vibrate the case) w/ heatsinks attached to it.
- All fans are attached with rubber grommets so when they vibrate, they don't do squat to the case. Here's an excellent example of this cottage industry: http://www.svc.com/ and http://www.silentpcreview.com/
- Some people elect to buy a fanless video card. When I built the HTPC some 4 years ago, the video card with the best bang for your buck that could to HDMI out and 1920x1080 cleanly still needed a fan. I could probably stand to upgrade the card now as this is the loudest component in the system but considering I don't game on this platform, there are far better places for me to spend my cash.
- SW is a relatively easy thing now. Even 2-3 years ago, you'd need to configure all kinds of codecs + post processing with FFDshow and Avisynth to get the best video possible (upconverting SD/HD video to 1080p w/ lots of post processing). With a hoppin' enough multi-core CPU, you can do quite a bit with just VLC and all its post processing checkboxes now.

TonyM
11-24-2010, 4:05 PM
* I don't leave my home theater PC (HTPC) on all the time; it's on whenever I need it.

* Videos are primarily streamed from my 24/7 on server. RAID on the server solves my backup problem. Games are installed locally.


+1

Sleep mode on the HTPCs works from the remote controls and I have two RAID 5 arrays for media that consist of six 1.5TB drives and eight 2TB drives connected to an always on Linux box in my office.

Satex
11-28-2010, 11:40 AM
The built in Media Center software makes accessing that content a pleasure.

- A windows remote


Is the software a part of Windows 7?
What's a Windows remote?

REDHORSE
11-28-2010, 11:47 AM
If your TV doesn't have wifi, but you have a PS3 plugged into it. I just stream HiDef movies/TV shows to the PS3 via Windows media or Vuze via my laptop with Win7 over my wireless network.

DaveFJ80
11-28-2010, 12:16 PM
I have both the Roku HD box and the WD Media Live box. Both pretty much offer the same packages like Netflix, Youtube, Amazon, and some other internet programing..... none of which really appeals to me since I canceled my Netflix account and I have a new PS3 again (I need to sell both since they're not doing me any good sitting in a box).

I've found running a laptop or CPU box on the side and using the PC port on the TV gives me a larger range or things I can watch online.