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View Full Version : U.S. Krag - NRA type carbine


v/dBrink
11-05-2010, 2:44 PM
I bought this carbine because I knew the former owner personally and because the bore is immaculate, which isn't always an easy thing to find on a U.S. Krag.

It appears to conform to the NRA-Bencia Arsenal configuration except possibly for the handguard. The stock is a correct 1899 carbine stock with no butt swivel and correct band keeper. The front sight, while commonly used for this purpose, has the tell-tale dressed pin on the base and the atypical shortened blade. And then there's the C-marked carbine rear sight.

While you can't be 100% sure you can narrow down the possibilities with some discerning inspection. This carbine seems to fit the pattern.

Receiver marked Model 1898 s/n 225698

http://images54.fotki.com/v514/photos/2/28344/157842/krags1b-vi.jpg

Typical Model 1903 front sight with the pin dressed to width and a short blade. The purpose of the hole is unknown. (speculation: in a long rack of similar carbines at a club or range this one would stand out due to the hole in the sight base).

http://images9.fotki.com/v54/photos/2/28344/157842/kr05-vi.jpg

http://images9.fotki.com/v251/photos/2/28344/157842/kr04-vi.jpg

http://images112.fotki.com/v590/photos/2/28344/157842/kr03-vi.jpg

http://images57.fotki.com/v66/photos/2/28344/157842/kr08-vi.jpg

Krags aren't one of my real strong areas of knowledge. I do have Brophy's book on the Krag and I'm the forum moderator at gunboards for the Krag forum, but I volunteered for that job to learn more about Krags, American, Norwegian & Danish.

I handload for .30-40. I've shot Lyman cast bullet 311299 and 311284 out of this rifle and it likes 311284 best (.309"). The rear sight has to be set at 400 yds to zero at 50 yds as the load is about 1,400 fps. It's a very nice handling rifle.

To see one of the earliest Krag rifles built in 1870 serial number 38. It may be an unfinished Trials rifle or patent model. I haven't yet written the Norwegian museum about it.
http://dutchman.rebooty.com/krag.html

Anubis Laughed
11-06-2010, 9:55 PM
Really nice piece!

I owned an 1898 Krag rifle made in 1901 a few years back, I loved the action on it. Smooth as silk, and the workmanship of the machining on the receiver reminded me of a Swiss watch!

gunboat
11-07-2010, 12:29 AM
My "Benicia" is similar -- 350xxx range (number not secret, it has been molested), rifle rear sight, 03 front sight without dovetail --
I have had it since 1957, cost a whopping $40 cash money. It was thought to be a genuine carbine at the time -- Has been a good shooter both with 311291 and 311316.

Divernhunter
11-07-2010, 4:23 AM
I have 2 krags. One is an original and the other is much like yours. May I suggest you not post the whole serial number on any public forum etc for your own protection about any firearm. Just put an XXX for the last 2-3 numbers. I enjoy shooting them and shot my first deer with an all original Krag in the late 1960's. They do have a slick action and I really like the side box mag on them.

v/dBrink
11-13-2010, 2:48 AM
May I suggest you not post the whole serial number on any public forum etc for your own protection about any firearm. Just put an XXX for the last 2-3 numbers.

I've been in the U.S. gun "community" for 44 years and online since 1993. X'ing out serial numbers is one of the more pathological practices that's carried over from some older time.

You say "for my protection". Huh? Please, explain that, in detail, exactly what you mean.

Explain any possible scenario where listing a serial number resulted in something... anything.. happening. Somebody could claim my Krag is theirs? Yes, they could claim they're Elvis' son, too. Claiming something and proving something are two different things. I welcome anyone to try.

This admonition is groundless. I'll discuss this any way you'd like.

mtsul
11-13-2010, 3:02 AM
I've been in the U.S. gun "community" for 44 years and online since 1993. X'ing out serial numbers is one of the more pathological practices that's carried over from some older time.

You say "for my protection". Huh? Please, explain that, in detail, exactly what you mean.

Explain any possible scenario where listing a serial number resulted in something... anything.. happening. Somebody could claim my Krag is theirs? Yes, they could claim they're Elvis' son, too. Claiming something and proving something are two different things. I welcome anyone to try.

This admonition is groundless. I'll discuss this any way you'd like.


+1:D

Rogerbutthead
11-13-2010, 3:46 AM
I have seen posts on other forums, especially German WWII rifle forums, where after the serial number of their rifle became public, someone who had a similar rifle with the same serial number - but perhaps a different manufacturer or alpha series, stolen - brought in the police to "reclaim" their stolen property.

This leads to time lost trying to explain to the authorities how multitudes of rifles out there could have the same serial number and not be the same rifle.

Much easier to just cover up a few digits and not having this possible problem.

CDFingers
11-13-2010, 4:40 AM
You gotta love us Americans: that's what I call optimism, iron sights graduated to 2300 yards.

That's a very nice rifle to have.

CDFingers

smle-man
11-13-2010, 8:49 PM
Sights like that were the rule and not the exception back then. The most distant setting wasn't for accurate shooting at 2,000 yds plus, it was for volley fire with the unit on line to create a beaten zone against troops, guns, or trenches before the time of machine guns on general issue. The rounds would disperse over a large area and since a number of troops were firing in volley the quantity of projectiles falling at that distance could be deadly and deny the area to troops attempting to form or manuever against the firers. At least that was the tactics of the day.