PDA

View Full Version : Taking newbies to the range - legal issues


IVC
10-31-2010, 5:29 PM
deleted

KylaGWolf
10-31-2010, 6:42 PM
Well some things to think about is one could they have a felony conviction. If not then all should be good. Then you might want to go over with them some basic gun safety before you actually take them shooting. That way they have some idea of what is safe. Oh might want to also see if they would be willing to go get the handgun safety card.

J-cat
10-31-2010, 6:47 PM
Tell them to get a COE.

CCWFacts
10-31-2010, 7:09 PM
One particular issue for RAW / large-cap owners is they can't be lent. The owner must stay in the immediate presence at all times. Just one more way they are trying to make it impossible for Californians to have personal experience with these things so they can ban them. Their efforts against us are a multi-generational effort.

Also RAWs can't be lent to minors at all, another way to make sure that a parent will never be able to let his minor child experience using an AR-15.

OmutaX
10-31-2010, 7:10 PM
You should check out LA Gun Club on 6th St in East/Downtown LA. Seems like there's a gangsta party there every night I've ever been there. I'm sure you're allowed to shoot and rent guns at a range even if you're a prior convict although you're not allowed to possess and own one.

russ69
10-31-2010, 7:53 PM
Also RAWs can't be lent to minors at all, another way to make sure that a parent will never be able to let his minor child experience using an AR-15.

Except for a bullet button, your kid can "experience" an AR all he wants. I don't think I would lend a RAW to anyone, especially a minor child, even if it was legal. Just saying.

Thanx, Russ

OleCuss
10-31-2010, 7:55 PM
You should check out LA Gun Club on 6th St in East/Downtown LA. Seems like there's a gangsta party there every night I've ever been there. I'm sure you're allowed to shoot and rent guns at a range even if you're a prior convict although you're not allowed to possess and own one.

No! Do not let a prohibited person hold, touch, or fire one of your weapons! If they are prohibited it means they are completely prohibited and they should not be anywhere near a non-secured firearm let alone firing one.

Edit: It occurs to me that you may have been employing sarcasm or something similar.

mdimeo
10-31-2010, 8:41 PM
Could anyone who has taken newbies to the range provide some input on what to ask them, how to ask them and generally what the considerations should be to stay on the up-and-up? Thanks.

I usually handle this by reminding them to bring ID, and then offhandedly saying "oh, and no felony convictions, right?" Which gives them a chance to laugh it off, or make a non-embarrassing excuse if they need to.

As far as bringing newbies, don't bring more than about two newbies per experienced shooter, make them memorize the Four Rules ahead of time, and make sure they know in advance what you mean if you shout "muzzle" at them.

Also I make it a policy not to hand guns back and forth from hand to hand; lay them down on the bench and have them do the same.

Peter.Steele
10-31-2010, 10:23 PM
.500 Magnum (S&W 500, 4" in Hogue wood for extra kick).


Obviously you've got some strong feelings for these gun-n00b friends if you're willing to spend the money on ammunition just to let them shoot that beast.

Thing is, I'm not sure if those feelings are on the 'love' or 'hate' end of the spectrum.

osokne
10-31-2010, 10:53 PM
As far as bringing newbies, don't bring more than about two newbies per experienced shooter, make them memorize the Four Rules ahead of time, and make sure they know in advance what you mean if you shout "muzzle" at them.

Also I make it a policy not to hand guns back and forth from hand to hand; lay them down on the bench and have them do the same.

^This... Been there. Recently had my wife (still kinda noob) with her new 10/22 and a friends youngest kid (24 yrs) a little long gun experience, nothing w/ handguns. Reviewed rules & safety. Range requires safety orientation. Had several handguns with us, gave each the full operational tour, had them show me in return, etc. It was almost at my limit. The RO stopped by & asked me if I was their instructor. Told him "nope" and that I was spouse to one & friend to the other. I asked if there were any problems and he said "Not at all, keep up the good work". He stopped by and helped from time to time, which finally freed me up to shoot!

IrishPirate
10-31-2010, 11:03 PM
the only question you need to ask is: Are my gun rights worth risking just to avoid someone else's embarassment?

blakdawg
11-01-2010, 12:03 AM
You could take them to a range that rents guns, and have them pay to rent the guns from the range - the range will have a well-defined process for identifying prohibited persons, and it won't seem like you're asking them judgmental/personal questions, since it's the range that's asking on a preprinted checklist.

Also, if they've always wanted to shoot a .357 or a .45 or whatever has stuck in their brain from watching TV/movies, they can do that, even if you don't have one.

2009_gunner
11-01-2010, 12:21 AM
Ask if they vote. Felons can't vote?

chewy352
11-01-2010, 12:30 AM
You could take them to a range that rents guns, and have them pay to rent the guns from the range - the range will have a well-defined process for identifying prohibited persons, and it won't seem like you're asking them judgmental/personal questions, since it's the range that's asking on a preprinted checklist.

Also, if they've always wanted to shoot a .357 or a .45 or whatever has stuck in their brain from watching TV/movies, they can do that, even if you don't have one.

All the ranges I have been to require every shooter to fill out a questionnaire that would identify a prohibited person . . . if they tell the truth that is.

iareConfusE
11-01-2010, 12:32 AM
Whenever I take newbies with me to the range, I always brief them at my home a day before the range trip. I will brief them on the universal firearms safety rules, as well as range safety rules. Additionally I will go through the operation of every firearm that they will be shooting. I teach them the functions of every button and lever, and then ask them to show me a few actions, such as dropping and unloading the mag, or inserting a mag and chambering a round. I find myself always having to remind them to keep their finger off the trigger. Eventually they catch on and memorize this themselves.

This is an effort to prepare them to become safe shooters the day of the range trip, and to avoid having to explain all of this at the range where it would be difficult for them to hear with gun shots all around. I find they learn a lot better and retain this memory in a stress-free environment. For newbies, a shooting range will most likely be a stressful place to be and they probably won't retain what you're telling them.

wash
11-01-2010, 10:44 AM
Ask them if they are prohibited.

I don't see any problem with it, it's just you being responsible and responsibility is the key to firearm safety.

If they aren't prohibited, get them together before they get to the range and show them safe gun handling practices without live ammo. After they can demonstrate proper safety, take them to the range.

At the range, start them with 1 round in the gun until they have proven their gun handling.

Kharn
11-01-2010, 10:45 AM
"Do you know you are a prohibited person or have any reason to believe you may be a prohibited peraon under state or federal law?"

doubledgarage
11-01-2010, 11:49 AM
You should check out LA Gun Club on 6th St in East/Downtown LA. Seems like there's a gangsta party there every night I've ever been there. I'm sure you're allowed to shoot and rent guns at a range even if you're a prior convict although you're not allowed to possess and own one.

So true!! LOL

I'm at LA Gun Club a lot. :D