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View Full Version : Can you hurt a Glock from dry firing?


Jerry X
10-15-2010, 7:24 PM
Can you hurt a Glock from dry firing?

CALI-gula
10-15-2010, 7:25 PM
No. Absolutely not. You can dry-fire them thousands of times and no issues will present themselves.

.

Corbin Dallas
10-15-2010, 7:35 PM
Can you hurt a Glock from dry firing?

YES, don't EVER EVER EVER dry fire a pistol!!!

You'll destroy the firing pin and ruin the slide....


:43:










































Nah, it's fine...

RollingCode3
10-15-2010, 7:57 PM
:xeno: We just had this same discussion two days ago about glock and dry firing.

RollingCode3
10-15-2010, 7:59 PM
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=352068

iareConfusE
10-15-2010, 8:00 PM
It'll turn your Glock into a grenade that explodes in your hand. Don't do it.

Shenaniguns
10-15-2010, 8:07 PM
Actually it can cause damage to the back of the breech face from excessive dry firing i.e. 50k+ dry fires for the 3rd gen, the 4th Generation has a new MIM striker and Glock officially does not recommend dry firing anymore which is a recent statement.

FUBAR
10-15-2010, 8:08 PM
Dry fire it all day and get used to the reset point.

rabagley
10-15-2010, 8:14 PM
Actually it can cause damage to the back of the breech face from excessive dry firing i.e. 50k+ dry fires for the 3rd gen, the 4th Generation has a new MIM striker and Glock officially does not recommend dry firing anymore which is a recent statement.

MIM? Okay, I officially am not upset that we can't get 4th gen glocks in CA. MIM == low cost garbage (IMO).

RollingCode3
10-15-2010, 8:19 PM
MIM? Okay, I officially am not upset that we can't get 4th gen glocks in CA. MIM == low cost garbage (IMO).

wow. Do you even own one? :rolleyes: Most handgun these days have MIM parts in it.

Grayblue
10-15-2010, 8:19 PM
It's like doing hard maneuvers with cars. It does not go any good to the car, but it won't cause an immediate damage.

Shenaniguns
10-15-2010, 8:29 PM
wow. Do you even own one? :rolleyes: Most handgun these days have MIM parts in it.


True, but:

A. there's good and bad MIM, I prefer none if possible for critical parts.
B. Their original strikers did not have a problem breaking with dry firing and now they do. IMO this looks like a cost cutting move and not an improvement.

Sturnovik
10-15-2010, 8:41 PM
MIM? Okay, I officially am not upset that we can't get 4th gen glocks in CA. MIM == low cost garbage (IMO).


I still dont get how MIM indicates bad quality? Whats the alternative method? I'm new to this so I reckon there's better ones?

I just got a 3rd gen glock 17, if the reports of broken strikers due to dry firing are true with the 4th gen then I'm glad the 3rds are good to go.

RollingCode3
10-15-2010, 8:52 PM
I still dont get how MIM indicates bad quality? Whats the alternative method? I'm new to this so I reckon there's better ones?

I just got a 3rd gen glock 17, if the reports of broken strikers due to dry firing are true with the 4th gen then I'm glad the 3rds are good to go.

Dont listen to those internet experts. They are every where. :TFH: A lot of firearm companies are using MIM parts these days (Sig, Kimber, etc..) . The Glock Gen 4 has been in the market for a while now and I haven't heard one single report or issue relate to Glock using MIM parts. GLock parts are cheap and extremely easy to replace. And yes, I own a Glock Gen 4.

Sturnovik
10-15-2010, 8:59 PM
Dont listen to those internet experts. They are every where. :TFH: A lot of firearm companies are using MIM parts these days (Sig, Kimber, etc..) . The Glock Gen 4 has been in the market for a while now and I haven't heard one single report or issue relate to Glock using MIM parts. GLock parts are cheap and extremely easy to replace. And yes, I own a Glock Gen 4.


In your opinion does the gen 4 stack up better to the gen 3?


Yea I figured with as many manufactures' as there are using MIM, I was about to say that would be a big gamble if the stuff was trash.

RollingCode3
10-15-2010, 9:05 PM
In your opinion does the gen 4 stack up better to the gen 3?


Yea I figured with as many manufactures' as there are using MIM, I was about to say that would be a big gamble if the stuff was trash.

I have no problem with mine ( about 350 rounds through it so far). It fits my hand A LOT BETTER than the GEN 3. :D

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v105/cadetcode3/guns/IMG_0880.jpg

CenterX
10-15-2010, 9:09 PM
MIM? Made in Montreal?

Shenaniguns
10-15-2010, 9:13 PM
Dont listen to those internet experts. They are every where. :TFH: A lot of firearm companies are using MIM parts these days (Sig, Kimber, etc..) . The Glock Gen 4 has been in the market for a while now and I haven't heard one single report or issue relate to Glock using MIM parts. GLock parts are cheap and extremely easy to replace. And yes, I own a Glock Gen 4.



So because you haven't done enough research to find problem, you want to get insulting? :rolleyes: My information is from legit sources in the industry, so why don't you call Glock, inc yourself to find out. And using Sig and Kimber as your model for 'quality' MIM parts do not help your case at all since they are both having more problems now with their cost cutting and MIM parts then before :43:

Sturnovik
10-15-2010, 9:13 PM
Haha, I've never shot it, but a fellow I met at the range let me hold a Glock 22 gen 4 up. I don't know the new rtf stuff just feels really abrasive to me but they look good, I think the slide serrations that they now put on are alot better. Much easier for me to rack the slide in the heat.


Considering you have to dry fire your pistol to field strip it, I'm sure its fine:cool:

Shenaniguns
10-15-2010, 9:15 PM
In your opinion does the gen 4 stack up better to the gen 3?


Yea I figured with as many manufactures' as there are using MIM, I was about to say that would be a big gamble if the stuff was trash.


It's for cost savings, not to benefit you.

stphnman20
10-15-2010, 9:17 PM
No it won't hurt it. But I recommend you using snap caps.

slick_711
10-15-2010, 9:20 PM
lol @ this thread

Sturnovik
10-15-2010, 9:22 PM
It's for cost savings, not to benefit you.

What exactly makes it inferior to other methods. I'm sure its more than reliable enough. Cost benefiting would be the reason and your absolutely right. But then again do we have any reason to believe that MIM is that inferior to whatever other methods are available?

Just because something is cheaper doesn't mean its crap. I would be more inclined to say just don't dry fire a lot, I think its a bad habit myself, but the gun was designed to dry fire to take apart so I'm sure its fine for the most part. I just wouldn't over do it.

Shenaniguns
10-15-2010, 9:30 PM
What exactly makes it inferior to other methods. I'm sure its more than reliable enough. Cost benefiting would be the reason and your absolutely right. But then again do we have any reason to believe that MIM is that inferior to whatever other methods are available?

Just because something is cheaper doesn't mean its crap. I would be more inclined to say just don't dry fire a lot, I think its a bad habit myself, but the gun was designed to dry fire to take apart so I'm sure its fine for the most part. I just wouldn't over do it.


MIM tends to leave voids in the metal and is usually not as dense as cast, forged or bar stock. Find a Master 1911 smith who will purposely use MIM critical parts in their masterpieces :D

Sturnovik
10-15-2010, 9:33 PM
MIM tends to leave voids in the metal and is usually not as dense as cast, forged or bar stock. Find a Master 1911 smith who will purposely use MIM critical parts in their masterpieces :D

Haha, I will give you that one. Then again I don't care for 1911's at all.

In any case, I'm sure we can recommend that he dry fire it only to take apart and occasionally for practice. It wont break, just don't over do it. And like my dad always taught, keep ammo locked away or in another room at least. Dry firing can just lead to bad habits, always check the chamber.

Shenaniguns
10-15-2010, 9:34 PM
Here's an interesting video btw unrelated to the strikers:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkHEdNx0Mk4

mixwell
10-15-2010, 9:38 PM
MIM? Made in Montreal?

I maybe wrong but I think MIM is something along the lines of metal injected molding ? I thought at first it meant Made In Mexico lol.. Some people think it is just a cheap cop out for the smaller parts but I've yet to hear anything bad and in reality MIM is probably just a new, cheaper, faster technology for making parts which is what technology is all about right ?

mixwell
10-15-2010, 9:45 PM
Just to add that if you dry fire a glock it = taking a leak on the bible so be warned !!! You don't want to piss off the dude with the beard upstairs. :D

rabagley
10-15-2010, 9:51 PM
MIM stands for "Metal Injection Molding" and is described in detail here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metal_injection_molding

In 1911's just about all of the high volume makers have moved to MIM parts and they have a well-established reputation for being much weaker and more prone to breakage than old Colt/Springfield parts or aftermarket parts. The process is a sintered metal powder, which is not even slightly similar to powdered metal forging. My understanding is that you can't get the controlled grain orientation or variations in hardening that you can get from forged/cast parts.

For noncritical low stress parts, sure, MIM can do a fine job. But I've had to replace two MIM sears that wore out with only hundreds of rounds through the firearm. I don't trust MIM for 1911 high stress parts, and I definitely wouldn't trust a Glock striker made from MIM. That would be immediately replaced with an aftermarket item in my gun.

Shenaniguns
10-15-2010, 9:54 PM
Haha, I will give you that one. Then again I don't care for 1911's at all.

In any case, I'm sure we can recommend that he dry fire it only to take apart and occasionally for practice. It wont break, just don't over do it. And like my dad always taught, keep ammo locked away or in another room at least. Dry firing can just lead to bad habits, always check the chamber.


It doesn't matter, there are Gunsmiths that work on M&P's for example that do not like MIM parts either and use a wire EDM process out of quality materials that will easily outlive the rest of the gun and stay consistently shaped/polished through it's lifetime.

dmacintyre
10-15-2010, 9:55 PM
Correct me if I am wrong but with modern firearms isn't it the case that rimfire should never be dry fired but everything else (within reason) is OK to practise this way?

Shenaniguns
10-15-2010, 10:00 PM
I forgot to add this link earlier regarding dry firing, DannyR is pretty close with Glock Smyrna.
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1269647

Sturnovik
10-15-2010, 10:04 PM
It doesn't matter, there are Gunsmiths that work on M&P's for example that do not like MIM parts either and use a wire EDM process out of quality materials that will easily outlive the rest of the gun and stay consistently shaped/polished through it's lifetime.


I'm sure there are components that are made of denser materials that could and do last longer. But I would find it hard to believe that a company like Glock would roll out a new version/generation without testing it, especially with something that important like the striker. I think alot of these QC are really blow out of proportion with other companies using MIM parts.

Shenaniguns
10-15-2010, 10:57 PM
I'm sure there are components that are made of denser materials that could and do last longer. But I would find it hard to believe that a company like Glock would roll out a new version/generation without testing it, especially with something that important like the striker. I think alot of these QC are really blow out of proportion with other companies using MIM parts.

Sig did it and now break things like hammers and slide stops.

chim-chim7
10-15-2010, 11:09 PM
Buy a dry fire trigger assembly. No racking the slide needed. Just pull as fast as you want. Awesome training tool.

Droc101
10-15-2010, 11:30 PM
Everytime you pull the trigger a unicorn and a kitten die, doj says so
lol