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SKSPOWER650
05-23-2006, 11:27 PM
Does Anyone Know Where I Can Do Some Good Pig Hunting At, I Have Went To A Few Hunting Spots With No Luck!!!
If Anyone Has Info For Me Let Me Know.thanks

glen avon
05-24-2006, 8:15 AM
go to jesse's hunting pages. there is no better place for pig hunting info. I have been to the seminars, read the books, blah blah blah.

jesse's has anything you will ever want to know (that is worth knowing).

chris
05-26-2006, 2:45 AM
depends what you want to do. pig hunting can be very expensive. the costs include the usual suspects. you may want to go to a guide or a private ranch that you can hunt them.

big jon
05-26-2006, 7:57 AM
i got this from my brother i havent had much time to go thru it but it looks purty good
http://www.jesseshunting.com/forums/index.php?showforum=16

tankerman
05-26-2006, 8:46 PM
It is what you make of it, if you want to spend around $500 give or take a little, you can get hog everytime out, with a guide service. Trespass fee/semi guided is slightly cheaper. Public land is cheapest. Be warned, if you really want hunting expirience you will likely be out of luck with a guide service unless you let them know that you actually want to spot and stalk and not just shoot from a truck or road. Many times these animals are killed at the food source without much challenge. If you truely enjoy the outdoors, try public land hunting. Do your research, put in your time scouting and walk some serious miles in some very dense brush and very steep hills. You may get one or not, public land can be productive but don't expect any secret tips on where to go, those are guarded secrets. Good areas are hard to come by on public land. Get out and have a look around.
A little piece of advice: when hunting public land,brush is generally very dense, if you do happen to come up on a hog, a scoped rifle is basically worthless at such short distances. Unless you plan on beating the hog on the head with it. Quick handling levergun or large caliber revolver or slug gun are the way to go. I found that out the hard way with a 300+ boar at under 10 yards in neck high brush, he was not happy to see me. My model 70 with a 3x9 leupold might have looked good, but was totally worthless in that situation. Way to scared to take my eye off that beast to even attempt to find it in the scope at that range.

Python2
05-27-2006, 7:16 AM
It is what you make of it, if you want to spend around $500 give or take a little, you can get hog everytime out, with a guide service. Trespass fee/semi guided is slightly cheaper. Public land is cheapest. Be warned, if you really want hunting expirience you will likely be ouy of luck with a guide service unless you let them know that you actually want to spot and stalk and not just shoot from a truck or road. Many times these animals are killed at the food source without much challenge. If you truely enjoy the outdoors, try public land hunting. Do your research, put in your time scouting and walk some serious miles in some very dense brush and very steep hills. You may get one or not, public land can be productive but don't expect any secret tips on where to go, those are guarded secrets. Good areas are hard to come by on public land. Get out and have a look around.
A little piece of advice: when hunting public land brush is generally very dense, if you do happen to come up on a hog, a scoped rifle is basically worthless at such short distances. Unless you plan on beating the hog on the head with it. Quick handling levergun or large caliber revolver or slug gun are the way to go. I found that out the hard way with a 300+ boar at under 10 yards in neck high brush, he was not happy to see me. My model 70 with a 3x9 leupold might have looked good, but was totally worthless in that situation. Way to scared to take my eye off that beast to even attempt to find it in the scope at that range.

Agree with you 100%. I paid $350 guaranteed pig on private/guided hunt in King City with dogs. It was not fun, I even hesitated to shoot the poor pig at 5 yards if not for the thought that the guide would charge me anyway even if I did'nt shoot. Felt like the pig was just let out of the corral.
I had more challenging and enjoyable hunt in public land succesfull or not.

SKSPOWER650
05-27-2006, 10:52 PM
Does Any One Know Of Private Land That I Can Pay A Fee To Hunt On?
I Have Been To Several Blm Spots With No Luck And My Time Is Running Out On My Pig Tag!!!!i Dont Think I Want To Go To A Game Ranch At This Time. Let Me Know If You Know Of Anyone Who Could Help Me Out.thanks:)

glen avon
05-28-2006, 12:32 PM
no. guides have all the huntable private land under option and contract.

just do a guided hunt and tell them you want fair chase.

50 Freak
05-29-2006, 2:23 AM
I'm thinking of going to do a public land hunt one day. I think it's more "sporting" that you probably will go home that day without a kill.

I've build my FAL with the idea I will use it for pig hunting. 7.5 pound 308 with a red dot instead of a scope.

What do you think of this setup? I've never hunted before and would love some input.

glen avon
05-29-2006, 7:04 AM
I think you will be shocked at how thin the alleged pigs are on public land. and I think you will be further shocked at how much work you have to do to even get to where they are thin.

sucess on public land is not in the "sporting" range of statistics - it's in the "cleaned Powerball all by myself" range.

it's that bad.

if you want fair chase with a real, yet uncertain (less than 50:50) chance to get an honest-to-goodness wild pig, then a Tejon Ranch Pig-o-rama is one of the few choices available to the general public.

tankerman
06-01-2006, 3:29 PM
Yes, as I said in my previous post, public land hunting is very difficult. Shocked is not the word I would use. Put your time in, you will find what your looking for if you know what to look for, and when. Spending time alone in the hills is very much a reward.
If you want an inexpensive pay to hunt opportunity, try Camp Roberts. It can be productive. Look in the reeds along the river. The hogs make small tunnels through them, you have to either jump them as the return to them in the morning or go in after them which can be scary. Suggest slug gun for the latter adventure ,also try the fence lines that border farms(specially if they are growing alfalfa or barley) early in the morning. Look for trails as hogs are creatures of habit and will return to the same places until something changes i.e. food or water runs out, or, the are disturbed by people. Look to water sources in the evening they will drink first every evening, if they come out before dark you have a chance then. Fresh tracks are the key. Also remember that the breeze will shift in the early morning and late evening. Don't get scented. When weather gets very hot Hogs can be caught trying to get water during the midday. Aviod going in the thick brush during the daytime if you plan on hunting the same areas in the evening or the following morning, as they probably will move on without you ever seeing them if you make to much commotion. Tracks can easily be spotted by walking or driving dirt roads and fire breaks. Good luck

jemaddux
06-01-2006, 3:58 PM
I normally hunt up in the King City area but heres a place that I know some people went to and had a great time http://www.huntcedarcanyon.com/ .

Its a bit of work the area is really hilly and a lot of brush. The pigs range from 100lbs and up pretty much. A lot of wild ones there that are pretty big now over the seasons. Good Luck

chris
06-02-2006, 2:55 AM
hey james my friend works there and the owner is my taxidermest. when i'm not deployed i do go there to help on the ranch and play around. i was about to post the link for the ranch but you beat me to it. hopefully you had a good time. i will be going there to shoot a pig when i get home. most likely the winter. if any of you go there listen to Paul he knows the pigs there and alos if you want a nice lookin one winter time is the time to get one. also it gets really cold there so be prepared for it. again i can only stress that you listen to Paul and Bill.

Draven
06-02-2006, 3:00 AM
Anyone gone pig hunting at Hunter Liggett?

jemaddux
06-02-2006, 6:49 AM
Anyone gone pig hunting at Hunter Liggett?


I never did have any luck at Hunter Liggett and I haven't known personally anyone that has.

chris
06-02-2006, 8:05 AM
i have hunted there before and never had any luck. pretty much wrote that place off.

bruss01
06-02-2006, 9:06 AM
Hey guys...

Gotta admit, I'm a complete and utter greenhorn when it comes to hunting, but would like to learn. Many hunters were taught by a father, grandfather, uncle - sadly, that didn't happen in my case. Many have friends who hunt from which they can learn - unfortunately, I'm not in that situation either.

I've had the hunter's education course but really I consider that a "license to learn" rather than a diploma. Planning to take it again this year just as a refresher. But the real challenge will be finding someone to "show me the ropes" in an actual field sense. Is this something you can get on a guided hunt? I see no challenge nor skill in simply marching up to the salt block or feed corn and blasting away at the animals congregated there. That's NOT hunting, at least not the kind I want to do. I want to learn the actual skills of hunting, including what to do after the shooting is all done. How best to go about this?

(Sacramento area, if that makes any difference)

jemaddux
06-02-2006, 9:49 AM
Hey guys...

Gotta admit, I'm a complete and utter greenhorn when it comes to hunting, but would like to learn. Many hunters were taught by a father, grandfather, uncle - sadly, that didn't happen in my case. Many have friends who hunt from which they can learn - unfortunately, I'm not in that situation either.

I've had the hunter's education course but really I consider that a "license to learn" rather than a diploma. Planning to take it again this year just as a refresher. But the real challenge will be finding someone to "show me the ropes" in an actual field sense. Is this something you can get on a guided hunt? I see no challenge nor skill in simply marching up to the salt block or feed corn and blasting away at the animals congregated there. That's NOT hunting, at least not the kind I want to do. I want to learn the actual skills of hunting, including what to do after the shooting is all done. How best to go about this?

(Sacramento area, if that makes any difference)

Best thing to do is just start reading, asking questions and making contacts. Be honest and let people know you are really interested in learning.

http://www.jesseshunting.com/forums/index.php?act=idx

Heres a start for you:D

wolfsong
06-11-2006, 1:30 PM
Just like JEMADDUX says - read, read, read. Basic tracking skills, animal habits and habitats, weather, hunter pressure, game care after the kill, hunting etiquette, first aid, survival skills in an emergency, all these things can be studied through reading. Over and over. Then get out in the field and put it to use. Learn something new each and every time you go out. I hunt primarily by myself, so I've spent a lot of time studying during the off season. The kill shot is over in a nano second. The real work is getting to the opportunity for a shot, and then field dressing and caring for the kill, not to mention getting it back to your rig/camp. And don't just spend timein the woods during hunting season, get out there all year round. Learn the land, learn animal habits and tendencies, locate year round water and feed sources, bedding areas, and major game trails. Always have a back-up plan, and remember, a straight path back to camp is not always the safest or best route to take, especially when you are removing your kill. Read and study and practice, practice, practice! I've now taught myself to butcher my game, make jerky, tan hides, and utilize as much as possible from just about any game animal I take. As most hunters take their game to be processed Professionally, and a lot don't really care for the taste of wild game, I get a lot of meat and hides from hunters that don't know what to do after the kill, or plain just don't want anything more than a few pictures and the horns. The more you learn, the more money you'll save, and the more enjoyment you'll get out of the hunt. I spend the slower winter monthes tanning hides, making stuff out of them, making jerky and sausage, and planning next season's hunt. Of course, I do spend a few weekends pig and coyote hunting, too. If you ask the right questions with the right attitude, there are plenty of seasoned hunters out here that will gladly share their know;edge and experiance with you. Just be willing to work at it. Good luck and straight shooting. Peace and God bless, Wolfsong.

SKSPOWER650
11-23-2006, 7:35 PM
Just Got One Guys Thanks For The Info

chris
11-23-2006, 9:09 PM
great where did you end up going too?

SKSPOWER650
11-23-2006, 10:45 PM
Up In The Buttes On A Friends Ranch